Jump to content
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...
Sign in to follow this  
Kim Jongseong

One arm dips, is it necessary?

Recommended Posts

Kim Jongseong

Hello. someone asked me which is harder one arm chin-ups vs one arm dips. then i thought why would i wanna do one arm dips? because I don't see any biomechanical benefits from doing it. One arm chin-ups can be used for elbow preperation but one arm dips? I think there is a reason why one arm dips is not in dip variations in BTGB. Is there any specific purpose to do it? Have you tried an one arm dip? thank you

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Rik de Kort

Because they're a cool move.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
yuri marmerstein

One arm dip sounds really awkward and seems like it would put the shoulder in a very vulnerable position.

Some of the russian turnik guys do variations it on a single bar. I couldn't imagine it without the very extreme shoulder mobility that these guys have

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Coach Sommer

Completely unnecessary. Once dips are mastered, move on to HSPU.

Yours in Fitness,

Coach Sommer

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Nic Branson

They would be their own thing. Certainly not for any progression we're using here.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Aaron Griffin
Completely unnecessary. Once dips are mastered, move on to HSPU.

Out of curiosity, if someone did want to learn this skill (I do not), how would you train up to it?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Nic Branson

Coach may opt to speak on this, but IMO that's well beyond anything here and without ALOT of preparation as Yuri mentioned earlier a very quick road to injury. I think it is better left alone. One of those skills that if you're in a position to develop then you would know where to look and who to ask. The risk of confusing anyone or somebody trying and getting hurt is not worth it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
FritsMB Mansvelt Beck

In rock climbing there is a move, called "a one arm mantle". It starts with a one arm pull up on a small ledge or sloping hold followed by a one arm press up (like a one arm muscle up) to bring one foot next to the supporting hand; the press up part is the "mantle". Not many climbers or boulderers can do it. Depending on how steep the wall is, the feet can help using friction on the wall or the move has to be done just by starting a one arm muscle up. Here is how Par Ament (who started his climbing as a gymnast) describes it on John Gill's website:

http://www128.pair.com/r3d4k7/Climbing& ... cs2.1.html

I one day did a one-arm mantel on a one-inch wide board against the wall in the gymnastics room at C.U.  My fellow gymnasts were impressed, and no one could repeat the problem. I did it over and over again, to their dismay. This developed from an easier exercise, beginning in a hang with my right arm, with the heel of my hand on the top of the board, above my head. I then pulled up using that hand in combination with the fingers of my left hand, using my bare feet to smear against the wall a bit, and then doing a one-arm mantel. I later did it without using my left hand at all! I started in a finger-tip hang from the small ledge, pulled up with one arm, and hopped the heel of my hand onto the ledge, then pressed up, locking my elbow out at the top and bringing my foot to the ledge.

All I can suggest is to start looking for that one inch ledge in your local gym.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Falcon
Completely unnecessary. Once dips are mastered, move on to HSPU.

Yours in Fitness,

Coach Sommer

Is it necessary to work through all of the dip progressions in the book and then starting with HSPU? For those who for example cannot perform HeSPU/HSPU in the WODs even after scaling down? (bad form, balance issues when doing freestanding)

My dips are already "strong" (can do korean undegrip, bulgarian PB), but I'm having serious problems with learning freestanding HeSPU, I can lower down but I don't have the strength to press back up. I'm not doing wall HeSPUs as they feel different from freestanding ones, and because of the arching that can and will occur if I lack strength.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Nic Branson

You need to progress through the wall versions to gain strength. You do know you can do them face to wall. It does make the balance easier. Alternately if you have a place to put your feet you can pike at the hips and press from there.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Joshua Naterman

I found that my freestanding HeSPU developed the best when I focused on the slowest possible negative, pausing every inch or so briefly to learn control at each point. I would then hover with my head just off the ground for as long as I could.

It didn't take more than a few weeks for me to be able to press up slowly with fairly good form. I already had 3 sets of 5-7 reps stomach to wall at that point.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Karri Kytömaa

One arm dips aren't too hard to do, but they do put your shoulders under extreme stress, one that if unprepared it might make some real damage. I have one friend who totally wrecked his shoulder with these. (Okay, maybe lots of other stuff too but I'm sure it contributed)

I*d really suggest to first get stable one arm handstand against wall before working on one arm dips. And absolutely work on them slowly extending the range like you would do with HSPUs. And obviously coach is right that it's not so useful movement but if you happen to need it, thats my 2cs.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Brian Li
One arm dips aren't too hard to do, but they do put your shoulders under extreme stress, one that if unprepared it might make some real damage. I have one friend who totally wrecked his shoulder with these. (Okay, maybe lots of other stuff too but I'm sure it contributed)

I*d really suggest to first get stable one arm handstand against wall before working on one arm dips. And absolutely work on them slowly extending the range like you would do with HSPUs. And obviously coach is right that it's not so useful movement but if you happen to need it, thats my 2cs.

One arm dips not too hard? Have you tried the ones on a bar with full ROM and body facing lengthwise with the bar or facing the bar directly without the chest ever leaning on the bar? I haven't tried it either, but I can imagine that you may need close to a 2x BW dip or even more and good shoulder mobility to be able to do one. There's no doubt that one is very strong on dips if they could do one of these one arm dips. I've seen some freerunners do OAD on walls, but with walls it's easier and takes less strength because most of their bodies are in contact with the wall.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Karri Kytömaa

Yeah, I'm indeed one of those said freerunners. Obviously it's extremely hard if you have to keep your whole body totally out of contact with the bar. Can't really even estimate the difficulty of that but I'm sure for full ROM it's pretty insane.

However the main point was that it's hardly a move you need to master.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Brian Li

One arm wall dips are pretty impressive too when done without too much twisting or piking, but with a bar it is much harder. I wasn't trying to bash freerunners just so you know. I think it may be impossible to stay clear of the bar the whole time, but I've seen some athletes do OAD with their body facing the bar and they leaned directly on the bar with their chest or stomach before pushing up and I think it is possible to do it without leaning on the bar at all and just press up all the way although you may inevitably touch the bar at some point but not lean like what those guys do (either way it's still hard). I also haven't seen the OAD where you face lengthwise with the bar on video or in person before, but I suppose it would be harder to cheat with that variation and may be harder than the other one.

I agree with you that this move is not necessary for gymnastics or Gymnastic Strength Training™, but it is sure a cool and difficult move and could be another alternative for people who want to get stronger at dipping, but are unable to use weighted dips. How about for freerunning, would it be useful there since this really is more of a freerunning exercise?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Karri Kytömaa

In freerunning it certainly has its uses. Obviously you aren't gonna go around doing strict OADs anywhere while freerunning, but there are places where you do wallrun to a spot where you can only place one hand. Essentially you are doing one arm muscle up driven with momentum from the wallrun. Training OADs contributes there heavily.

Places where you actually need it are rare but it's cool thing to train for and essentially it makes sure your wall run technique is great.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Please sign in to comment

You will be able to leave a comment after signing in



Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×

Important Information

Please review our Privacy Policy at Privacy Policy before using the forums.