Jump to content
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...
Sign in to follow this  
Edward Smith

Dynamic Strength Training!

Recommended Posts

Edward Smith

Hey Everyone,

I have some questions about dynamic strength and the dynamic strength forum, hopefully you can help.

1. Coach Sommer, what sort of stuff would be defined (in your books) as post worthy in the dynamic strength forum?

2. Where should dynamic/power work be placed in a workout before or after strength work?

3. And finally does conversion of strength to power need to be movement specific? I will use pistols as an example, say you have built up your pistol quite nicely (sufficient at free-hand and can do weighted) should you do jumping pistols (for height or length) or would sprints help with converting it to power?

Thanks anyone willing to help,

Ed

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Edward Smith

I just thought I'd give this post a hit since no-ones given any answers (I'm not complaining), so I figured people might have another look-over the post.

Ed

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Nic Scheelings

Hey Ed,

Since you haven't had any replies i'll give you my opinion and see if that generates some debate. I think it would depend on the nature of the dynamic excercise, for example i will always do things like snatch or cleans (I can't think of an appropriate gymnastics example, maybe rings routines?) at the start of my workout as they are extremely demanding on my whole body. However things like explosive pushup variations or even rope climbs I am much more comfortable fitting in the middle of my workout.

I also notice that coach sommer uses L-sit walks at the end of his athlete's conditioning so it would appear dynamic excercises can fit anywhere as long as they can be performed appropriately.

With your last question i would say both jumping pistols and sprints would be a great way to convert that strength into power. Even kicking a bag would help (and its heaps of fun!)

Cheers hope this helps

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Coach Sommer

Basic vs Dynamic Strength

For the beginning to intermediate level athlete it is far more productive to concentrate on acquiring basic strength. This is not to imply that dynamics strength work will not be done, it will, but it will remain a secondary focus. After this foundation of basic strength is achieved, then the acquisition of dynamic strength will progress far more rapidly and with far more spectacular results.

This is why the majority of the training information I have provided to date has been regarding basic strength development. The old adage certainly applies to Gymnastic Strength Training™ as well; we must learn to walk before we can run.

Yours in Fitness,

Coach Sommer

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Valentin

Hello

I am not Coach Sommer, but to me Dynamic Strength, is anything to do with power training, or specific strength over a ROM. For example a V-sit is a static hold in itself and should not be deemed worthy of posting here, BUT! L-sit lift to V-sit is a dynamic movement that requires strength and control over a ROM. Example iron cross pullouts are dynamic, iron cross holds are not. Generally without some form of static/basic strength (usually quantified be general non specific exercises) you won't be able to move onto dynamic work.

In a workout POWER training should be done separately from strength training when/if possible. If not possible, then it should be done first, but this must be done at least in periodical process. Let me explain this. Power training is best achieved when the resistance or intensity is at 60% of your MAX for a specific movement, with repetitions between 6-8, with the focus on doing the movement with maximal velocity (its important that the speed of movement is the dictating factors as to when to stop, but generally 6-8 with 60% of MAX intensity is the magic number). If you can do more then 8-reps than you need increase the load. This is one of the problems with calisthenics that measuring the intensity and regulating is not as easy or always possible as with free weights or machines.

Strength to power has to most definitely be movement specific for greatest transfer of training effect, however the closer and the more specific the exercises the better. In the example you provide you would you need an end goal, because it depends it really depends what you need the power for. For a vertical jump, then the single leg squat with jump for height is best, if you want to improve your sprint than weighted sprints, and single pistols for distance are more beneficial but you would work the pistols with jump or vertical also, because in running there are huge vertical ground reaction forces as well. So the selection in exercises is dependent on the goal in mind. For gymnastics general plyometric exercises is the key, and not just power.

Hope that help

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Edward Smith

Thanks Valentin,

Could you please elaborate on how you can do power training separately from strength training? would it involve having two different sessions?

Thanks,

Ed

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Valentin

The best way is to periodise your power and strength training. Depending on your sport, competitions, amount of times you want to peak etc.. your periodisation plan will be based around.

But in general (very general) You would start a year with a a block of about 8-12 weeks of hypertrophy training (which is to increase the potential for relative and absolute strength), following this period of hypertrophy you would spend about 3-4 months of pure strength, and then which will usually be as you are getting closer to final goal you start working on the power for a period of about 3month. It doesn't mean that you can train other aspects, its just means that as you move from one phase/mesocycle to another your priorities change, but you try to maintain your level achieved in other aspects. With hypertrophy, in gymnastics you would actually stop it all together by 1/4 through your Strength mesocycle, because you don't want to stack on unnecessary muscle mass.

Anyways that the best way to go about the convesion process is through periodisation. Periodisation training however is a science in its own right.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Please sign in to comment

You will be able to leave a comment after signing in



Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×

Important Information

Please review our Privacy Policy at Privacy Policy before using the forums.