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David  Hurwitz

Street Workout & Skipping Progressions

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David  Hurwitz

I came back to the forum after a few years away and I’m catching up on all the posts where Coach Sommer weighed in.  Nothing has changed.

Someone mentions all the strength elements he possesses and then asks what progression to skip to, or what exercises will help learn really demanding strength hold.  A handful of members immediately weigh in and patiently explain that preparation has likely been omitted, that the poster is not nearly as strong as he thinks, and why the GB progressions are laid out the way they are: to build strength and mobility in a progressive manner that builds on the previous sequence.

After lots of great feedback from the members, the poster explains why he is nevertheless ready and disagrees with all the advice that he solicited in the first place.

Finally, Coach comments, affirms all the sound advice given, and reiterates it succinctly.

As a final rebuttal, the poster cites “street workout” athletes who claim to have achieved high levels of strength without any recommended progressions.  Several things are possible:

1.       The gentleman in the park grew up in competitive gymnastics but didn’t make it publicly known.

2.       He held the position for 1 second, or rather passed through it, not 3-5 at a minimum.

3.       He tore his brachialis or ruptured his biceps tendon the very next day.  Maybe he will next year.

Or

4.       Maybe none of the above is true.  Maybe he’s one of the .01% born with superhuman strength that can achieve such an advanced hold without typical preparation.  But if that’s the case then he’s the exception, not the rule.  Treating the exception as the rule is faulty logic and dangerously irresponsible.  What are the odds that you’re more similar to him and not to the rest of the world’s athletic population?

If I had a dominant high school basketball career, I wouldn’t cite LeBron James’s success when arguing that I should skip college. 

These posters make it hard on themselves.  If you want maltese progressions and drills, include videos of your cross, rings planche, lock arm press, etc.  That’s the only way anyone will believe you’re as strong as you say.  If you don’t like the advice you’re getting, then find a coach who’s taught the strength elements differently.  (Though I was at a boys’ coaching clinic 5 years ago, and coaches with Jr. National Team boys were recommending Coach Sommer’s program.)

I’m sure this exact point has been made a hundred times elsewhere on the forum, but I got worked up enough that I had to make my thoughts known.

Thank you to Coach Sommer, to the forum moderators, and to the everyday athlete like me who takes it slow and steady, even when Straddle Ups take forever to master!

 

 

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Alessandro Mainente
6 hours ago, David Hurwitz said:

I came back to the forum after a few years away and I’m catching up on all the posts where Coach Sommer weighed in.  Nothing has changed.

Someone mentions all the strength elements he possesses and then asks what progression to skip to, or what exercises will help learn really demanding strength hold.  A handful of members immediately weigh in and patiently explain that preparation has likely been omitted, that the poster is not nearly as strong as he thinks, and why the GB progressions are laid out the way they are: to build strength and mobility in a progressive manner that builds on the previous sequence.

After lots of great feedback from the members, the poster explains why he is nevertheless ready and disagrees with all the advice that he solicited in the first place.

Finally, Coach comments, affirms all the sound advice given, and reiterates it succinctly.

As a final rebuttal, the poster cites “street workout” athletes who claim to have achieved high levels of strength without any recommended progressions.  Several things are possible:

1.       The gentleman in the park grew up in competitive gymnastics but didn’t make it publicly known.

2.       He held the position for 1 second, or rather passed through it, not 3-5 at a minimum.

3.       He tore his brachialis or ruptured his biceps tendon the very next day.  Maybe he will next year.

Or

4.       Maybe none of the above is true.  Maybe he’s one of the .01% born with superhuman strength that can achieve such an advanced hold without typical preparation.  But if that’s the case then he’s the exception, not the rule.  Treating the exception as the rule is faulty logic and dangerously irresponsible.  What are the odds that you’re more similar to him and not to the rest of the world’s athletic population?

If I had a dominant high school basketball career, I wouldn’t cite LeBron James’s success when arguing that I should skip college. 

These posters make it hard on themselves.  If you want maltese progressions and drills, include videos of your cross, rings planche, lock arm press, etc.  That’s the only way anyone will believe you’re as strong as you say.  If you don’t like the advice you’re getting, then find a coach who’s taught the strength elements differently.  (Though I was at a boys’ coaching clinic 5 years ago, and coaches with Jr. National Team boys were recommending Coach Sommer’s program.)

I’m sure this exact point has been made a hundred times elsewhere on the forum, but I got worked up enough that I had to make my thoughts known.

Thank you to Coach Sommer, to the forum moderators, and to the everyday athlete like me who takes it slow and steady, even when Straddle Ups take forever to master!

 

 

I decided to spend some words here in regard of coach Sommer. I had my first seminar 10 years ago.

He changed my vision, he changed my way of training and consideration about strength, progression, adaptation etc, he saved my job.  

10 years after i'm one of the top coaches in Italy for calisthenics and bodyweight fitness, you can see my results with my clients in my instagram profile.

i have coached gymnastics with some interregional satisfaction.

i held lessons to many congresses in italy, written articles for specialized magazines, i held lessons at the university.

And i have zero clients with injuries...my strongest one has Maltese, another 30'' crosses, another one has 10 one-arm pull-up, another one 15'' manna.

I have learned a solid way to think about training ME and OTHER PEOPLE.

No compromises, quality over quantity, and patience.

REsults will come. Enjoy the process.

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