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Trevor Catterall

Wall or Free standing handstands to start?

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Trevor Catterall

Hello all,

as a total novice should I skip the wall and try to do free balancing handstands? My goal is to achieve a single handstand pushup. The thing I find most difficult is kicking to handstand and the balance element.

Aside from being in handstand which of the other fundamental isometric moves in BTGB will support me most in attaining this goal?

Thanks for all feedback.

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Blairbob

Both.

Work the wall for correct body shape and strength. Start taking one off the wall when you can.

In the meantime work kicking one leg to short of vertical in a HS from a lunge or prone position. Then kick one leg and switch them in the air landing on the opposite leg that you started on. Eventually, catch up 2nd leg to first.

http://drillsandskills.com/article/19

Just remember to figure out how to do a forward roll out of a headstand if you are going to work the wall HS (stomach to wall).

When you can hold the stomach to wall HS, add in kicking to HS against the wall.

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Animalonfire
In the meantime work kicking one leg to short of vertical in a HS from a lunge or prone position. Then kick one leg and switch them in the air landing on the opposite leg that you started on. Eventually, catch up 2nd leg to first.

Thanks, that's an awesome drill (problems sticking once I'm up, so I add a pause at the top and tap my feet together-feels great). Looking through the article for any more now.

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Blairbob

It works well for the 4&5yo boys. :D

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yuri marmerstein

If you can already kick up, walking on your hands can be quite beneficial.

But as stated before, make sure you know how to bail out of comfortably.

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jl5555
If you can already kick up, walking on your hands can be quite beneficial....

Yuri, can you give an idea of why doing some walking on hands can also be beneficial? Is there an added strength or balance component?

I'm just curious because I've wondered at the differences. At the gym when your average gym rat says they can do a handstand it usually means they can walk on their hands for a few feet. It always appears to me that they do this with legs dangling over and very arched back which wouldn't translate very well to a static handstand.

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yuri marmerstein
If you can already kick up, walking on your hands can be quite beneficial....

Yuri, can you give an idea of why doing some walking on hands can also be beneficial? Is there an added strength or balance component?

I'm just curious because I've wondered at the differences. At the gym when your average gym rat says they can do a handstand it usually means they can walk on their hands for a few feet. It always appears to me that they do this with legs dangling over and very arched back which wouldn't translate very well to a static handstand.

It does translate. First of all, it is good for shoulder strength lifting up one arm at a time. There is a coordination issue as well. Walking is easier than standing because you don't have to adjust your balance but at the same time it is a natural progression to learning to balance.

Most people walk on their hands the way they do because noone has ever critiqued them and that is how they got the job done.

When first learning handstands(especially freestanding ones) it is better to spend as long as you can on your hands. That means fighting to stay up, and walking to do that is fine. Plus it is fun.

Give it a try. Walk in all directions, hop, shuffle, etc. Be creative with it.

Of course if you only work on walking you won't learn to stand, but it is great to begin with and as conditioning.

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Blairbob

Holding a handstand in one places requires minute corrections in the wrists or fingers and palm. Walking around on the hands is akin to big corrections instead of small ones.

Think gross motor control vs fine motor control.

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