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Alexander Castiglione

Torso and Body Proportions - Impact on GST?

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Alexander Castiglione

Hey GB, 

I was having this discussion with a buddy of mine, and wanted to see what the forum had to say. When it comes to certain GST standards, would certain ratios make some work easy while others are hard. 

For instance, I have short (relative) femurs - so my squat for the longest time was almost as much as my deadlift until I corrected that. Pistols for me a pretty easy when you relate it to GST - as was getting to over my bodyweight on a weighted lunger. 

I also have short (relative) arms - so bent arm work is progressing way faster that straight arm work. I can do legless rope climbs with relative ease. 

For my core work, I can hold hollow very well, as well and straddle sits and L sits. I frequently do L Sit Hangs for over 45 seconds in false grip. 

Now is when it gets interesting - I have a tough time with handstands, and am working several progressions, but I feel like I'm having a real tough time finding the sweet spot. My torso is relatively long, and I'm wondering if that would be a reason why press to handstands and solid freestandings are giving me such a hard time? Also, my straight arm strength needs work. 

Anybody have any notions on how torso length and limb size relate to different GST movements? 

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Frank Santasiero

Alexander,

I will give you my take on it. There is no doubt that certain body proportions make some exercises or skills easier or harder. That being said the specifics of your post above lead me to believe that you are very strong, maybe from prior resistance training. You probably have little straight arm strength because nobody ever works on that (especially in the end range of motion). Handstands are just hard and just because you are strong doesn't mean you can quickly learn to do a handstand. Personally I can't give you a pass because you are having trouble with handstands. I am having trouble as well and have average body proportions. Let's just keep working and accept the fact that these things take time for adults to learn.

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Everett Carroll

Your proportions absolutely have an effect on how hard it is to perform movements. None of these skills are impossible for us to learn but will certainly take more time and effort than someone with an ideal gymnastic physique.

Like Frank said, SAS movements (handstands included) are simply tough and most haven't put much time into training them prior to their GST career.

You might enjoy this TED Talk: 

 

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John Kiggundu
14 hours ago, Alexander Castiglione said:

Hey GB, 

I was having this discussion with a buddy of mine, and wanted to see what the forum had to say. When it comes to certain GST standards, would certain ratios make some work easy while others are hard. 

For instance, I have short (relative) femurs - so my squat for the longest time was almost as much as my deadlift until I corrected that. Pistols for me a pretty easy when you relate it to GST - as was getting to over my bodyweight on a weighted lunger. 

I also have short (relative) arms - so bent arm work is progressing way faster that straight arm work. I can do legless rope climbs with relative ease. 

For my core work, I can hold hollow very well, as well and straddle sits and L sits. I frequently do L Sit Hangs for over 45 seconds in false grip. 

Now is when it gets interesting - I have a tough time with handstands, and am working several progressions, but I feel like I'm having a real tough time finding the sweet spot. My torso is relatively long, and I'm wondering if that would be a reason why press to handstands and solid freestandings are giving me such a hard time? Also, my straight arm strength needs work. 

Anybody have any notions on how torso length and limb size relate to different GST movements? 

@Alexander Castiglione as @Everett Carroll has said, it is definitely true that certain body proportions lend themselves to doing certain GST movements easier/with difficulty compared to those with ideal body proportions. 

I have relatively long femurs, tight ankles, and a relatively short torso, which makes doing single leg squats pretty damn challenging for me. I had to master the  SLS progressions with a counterbalancing weight, but less a month ago I attempted a trick which seems promising for my future SLS. I basically squatted with my back against a wall and tried to bring my heels as close to the wall as possible while in this squatted position. I know it activated my ankles, but I don't know what else it did because long story short, after squatting like that I was able to do one SLS without any counterbalancing weights whatsoever. It was the first time I had accomplished that ever.

I think we just need to acknowledge that it might be more difficult/easier to do certain movements, and try to give it our best regardless of these constraints/advantages.

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Leo Trinidad

I agree with Everett, Frank and John. The thing is not to worry about body proportions and think that you just need to get stronger anyway because we are all aiming at the same direction and that is to achieve superhuman strength. ;)

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GoldenEagle

Regarding the topic... Despite physical limitations of our body. Coach Sommer has stated on a number of occasions that our connective tissue development is key to getting stronger.

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