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Wesley Manson

Recovery and Supercompensation

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Wesley Manson

Hey everyone. I was looking at this image I found (below) and wanted your opinions on how you can accurately tell when supercompensation is. Is feeling soar a good indicator that you are still recovering, or could that still be a state of super compensation where it is time to train that muscle group again and you will perform better than last workout. Sometimes I feel when I train planche for example, that I need at least 2 or 3 days to recover and it is time to train it again. This what most of you guys feel? 

Just want your thoughts on the image below and to answer these few questions.

 

2000px-Supercompensation.svg_.png

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Alessandro Mainente

The image reflects processes which can be evaluated only with precise blood and body analysis from people to people, so basically it is impossible to predict when. with a good programming we can adjust this "when" with some days of rest. the programming depending on the type of the athlete (beginner, intermediate or advanced) reflects the ability of a physique to recover properly. the ability to complete a task, do better then before etc it is a good sign of recover.

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Cole Dano

Keep in mind that the graph is theoretical and an abstraction of the multiple processes that occur in adaptation.

This is also commonly represented in the two factor theory in which fitness and fatigue are the factors.

A training session will increase both fatigue and fitness. The ideal training interval is determined by balancing how much fatigue has dissipated vs how much fitness gained still remains. 

For us regular people the point is to listen to your body and observe what happening in your training with different training intervals.

Also keep in mind that it's not a static or fixed process, recovery times and fitness gains can vary over the course of many training cycles, so you need to constantly monitor whats happening, but in a relaxed way. You'll never get it perfect but as long as your in the general ballpark, you'll do ok.

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Matic Balantic

Maybe measuring heart rate variability could help to determine one's recovery ability?

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Wesley Manson

Thanks for all the responses. I am just trying to figure out the best gaps in between similar execises. My planche training has been pretty stagnant, and actually my last training sessions I could not hold it as long as my previous session, so I am trying to find that "sweet spot." Planche training, press to handstand, and handstand training all tire out my shoulders, so it is difficult to advance in all three. I am trying to prioritize my goals, just seems I need to devote more time! Love the journey GST has put me on. It feels like an ongoing game of chess.

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Alessandro Mainente
8 hours ago, Matic Balantic said:

Maybe measuring heart rate variability could help to determine one's recovery ability?

Actually the HRV it is the last piece of the puzzle and it is determined by too many factors not necessary involved into training. Measure progress along the week it is the only solution for you.

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Daniel Kiely
On 17/11/2016 at 8:53 AM, Alessandro Mainente said:

Measure progress along the week it is the only solution for you.

Measure which progress? Sets and reps? 

On 17/11/2016 at 8:53 AM, Alessandro Mainente said:

Actually the HRV it is the last piece of the puzzle and it is determined by too many factors not necessary involved into training.

But don't all those factors also dictate recovery? 

Dan

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Leo Trinidad

Hi @Daniel Kiely,

Yes measure progress through the proper sets and reps/time. HRV is not the only factor that will dictate recovery.

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Coach Sommer

Gentlemen,

HRV is a tool better left for higher level athletes to explore.  At your level it is much more important to learn to master the basics.

Yours in Fitness,

Coach Sommer

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Alessandro Mainente
On 12/28/2016 at 8:19 PM, Coach Sommer said:

Gentlemen,

HRV is a tool better left for higher level athletes to explore.  At your level it is much more important to learn to master the basics.

Yours in Fitness,

Coach Sommer

Coach Sommer hit the point before me, for your level the perceived level of fatigue like quality of life, sleep, energy, the amount of fatigue in a 0-10 scale it is better to say something about overtraining. the possibility to overtraining with foundations it is extremely low.

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