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Guest ilove2workout28

Planche issues involving back strength

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Guest ilove2workout28

I can't seem to flatten my back while performing a planche. I can for like a second or so, but my wrists also seem to "give out" too. Any thoughts?

Daniel

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Blairbob

The advanced tuck planche needs a more aggressive forward lean than the tuck planche. Many people end up having the hips high when first doing them this way.

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Bob Sanders

Its really hard on the wrist. I try to condition my wrist that it is strong enough to support my weight in a straddle planche. Try to do it on a parallette and alternate it with working on the floor. I am going for maybe 1 or 2 times a week on the floor and the rest on a parallette. And yes like Blairbod said it needs a more aggressive lean to it. That's getting you into what the real planche is gonna be like. Lean more forward will let you lift the hips up more. Do it in front of a mirror to self-spot yourself.

Make sure to do lots of writs conditionings and pre-habs here: viewtopic.php?f=17&t=61#p270

and here: viewtopic.php?t=860&start=15

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Seiji

I don't really understand how your wrists give out if you're supporting yourself on the heel of the palm... but oh well.

I'm having this too. My back strength is the only thing stopping me from at least straddle planching (maybe even planche).

Thus, I have two recommendations: Coach says kettlebell/dumbbell swings will help. Pick a good weight and alternate arms after 5 reps or so. Holding it around knee or shin level, swing your arm and lift up your back until you're vertical, then go down. It's that simple. Rest, repeat. He also advocates jefferson curls. Holding a dumbbell, arch your back down one vertebrae at a time. That means touch your chin to the chest and curl the upper body down, then the lower. You should go until you feel a VERY slight pull (not all the way into a stretch) and reverse the process by starting to uncurl the lower back first, then upper.

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Gregor

If you have fingers pointing forward, it could be painfull if you go further ahead (lack of wrist flexibility).

Why people often think the problem is in their backs? Because in the planche body works like scale. More you will go fruther ahead more it will be scaled with legs. So the catch is when people go forward with shoulders, they see how hard is to hold planche. That's why people don't go forward enough with shoulder and trying to hold the planche and guess what? Due to bad scale balance beatween shoulders and legs they need to have stronger back, alot more then they should if they would go further ahead.

It was the same with my maltese om rings. I was arched in my back as it is even possible. The problem was nowhere in my back, just a lack of strength in my shoulders (front delts) and pecs. When I corrected it was all like, why for hell I didn't do this two years before...

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scottmo

Gregor, Are you saying it is the lack of shoulder strength that hinders most people when trying to perform the planche? And if so, what specific exercises would you do for achieving the shoulder strength needed for the planche. I do know many have been mentioned. I am interested in your particular expertise what have you found that strengthens the shoulders for this particular skill. thanks

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Gregor

Yes, I think the lack of shoulders strength is number one problem in majority. If you can do leg rises with 15kg, you have 100% of back strength for planche.

For maltese or planche you must to carry over all weight on shoulders, lats and pecs. Do you know what is CTI (we all know that is imposible and legs are going under the bar)? Whell planche with not enough lean forward is actualy like CTI turned to the ground :lol:

Good exercises:

- rusian dips with lean forward in rising up part

- iron cross

- planche leans

BTW there are whole topics about planche exercises (two of them are sticky).

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scottmo

Gregor, Are you refering to Reverse Leg Lifts with 15kg attached or standard leg raises (foward) with 15 kg to help dev back strength? If RLL were you performing them holding a pommel horse as in BtGB book or RLL headstand variation? I was very interested in your input with this skill and am aware there is alot of info already listed. Also do you perform the Russian Dips leaning foward weighted ever or perhaps on rings instead of parallel bars? Thanks again.

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Gregor

RLL on pommel horse.

I've nevertried it on rings, and never weighted. You can try weighted but be carefull on your shoulders.

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Blairbob

How would you perform the russian dips on rings? The closest thing to this is starting from the top of the pullup of a MU before you transition to the dip.

A RLL while lying on something horizontally is similar to a reverse hyper. It should be significantly easier than a HeS/HS (Reverse)LegLift.

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scottmo

Blairbob, pertaining to the russian dips on rings. If you google russian dips Gregors vid comes up on tinypic. When he performs the russian dips on the parallel bars with the heavy foward lean that is what I was refering to by using the rings, it would almost be like performing a Korean Dip with the undergrip as the chest is pushed foward the hands would supinate the rings placing a heavy stress on the anterior deltoid while the dip is performed.

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Razz

The 'korean dip on rings' is called rings turned out (RTO) dip :)

now i'm not able to do full planche but in theory if one is able to do full lay back lever shouldn't the back strength for full planche be there? I mean I agree with Gregor that people often think the planche is too much about having that enourmously strong lower back to keep your legs straight when it is really about having shoulders strong enough to lean forward.

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scottmo

Razz, I dont know if the standard "rings turned out dip" places the same emphasis on the ant delt as will as biceps without the extreme foward lean component.

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Blairbob

Actually a Korean dip on rings would have an excessive amount of ring turn out so that the rings were turned out 90 degrees from parallel. It's possible and quite difficult.

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