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Gregor

Pseudo planche push ups and planche lean video

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Gregor

Video where it covers all details for pseudo planche push ups and planche leans...

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I made a sticky topic for this video made by our member slizzardman.

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deljosque

should be close to planche i think

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Blairbob

http://drillsandskills.com/article/15 Towards the bottom of the article.

I will not insert the pics in the article due that being leeching bandwidth but I will see about finding or taking some ASAP.

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Quick Start Test Smith

Great video, Slizzardman! :D

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Tarun Suri

I'll report my question here since it's probably more appropriate.

You mentioned that your muscles will get stronger than your ligaments. If that's the case, should I purposefully slow my progressions to take that into account? How would I know that the joint is now strong enough to go to something harder?

Also, where do planche leans take place during the planche progressions? What I mean is, should they be attempted after mastering the frog stance? The Tuck Planche? Etc. Or is this a separate static hold that should have it's own time in one's training?

Very informative video.

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Blairbob

Planche leans can be worked along with the frog stand or advanced frog stand. They don't really teach you the balance component of the planche, but since it's self assisted you could work them all the way up in bands or off a chair or ball till you could do planche.

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Rampage

Alright so, what is the main difference between doing planche lean pushups, in which your fingers are pointing straight forward like in a regular pushup and you just lean forward as much as you can, and between doing the pseudo-planche pushups, in which your fingers are pointing sort of like to the sides or even backwards? Is the hand positioning the difference here? Because he does 2 types of pushups here: with fingers pointing straight forward, and pointing to the sides.

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Blairbob

In a Pseudo-Plance Pushup it does not matter which directions your fingers face. It is all about leaning as much forward as possible.

Fingers pointing backward or sideways-backwards is more like rings.

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Rampage
In a Pseudo-Plance Pushup it does not matter which directions your fingers face. It is all about leaning as much forward as possible.

Fingers pointing backward or sideways-backwards is more like rings.

But isn't it significantly different, at least, to:

1- Position yourself in a normal pushup position, with fingers pointing directly forward, and then to lean forward as much as you can, and do a pushup, and

2- To just place your hands as far back as you can, while leaning forward, but when you do this it is impossible to do it with your fingers pointing forward; your fingers have to point either to the sides or backwards, and then do a pushup.

To explain better, what's the difference between what slizzardman did at 1:53-1:59 and what he did at 3:34? Is one more difficult/better than the other?

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Blairbob

So long as you are leaning your shoulders forward of your hands, it's a PPPU. They are a bit diffrent to the muscles.

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Joshua Naterman
I'll report my question here since it's probably more appropriate.

You mentioned that your muscles will get stronger than your ligaments. If that's the case, should I purposefully slow my progressions to take that into account? How would I know that the joint is now strong enough to go to something harder?

Also, where do planche leans take place during the planche progressions? What I mean is, should they be attempted after mastering the frog stance? The Tuck Planche? Etc. Or is this a separate static hold that should have it's own time in one's training?

Very informative video.

First off, I want to thank everyone for their support and comments :) Thank you! I love contributing here. I have learned a lot and I love sharing.

Ok, with the planches I think it is important to do intentionally slow down your work a little. I want to point out that I was already very, very strong before starting here, and that is a large part of why I progressed so quickly. I was misled by my muscular strength into thinking that it would be ok to train these advanced positions :) I am also 230 lbs, which makes all of this much more stressful on my elbows, and necessitates that I be more cautious in my progressions.

I personally started my planche training with the planche leans, they are what got me to flat tuck planche very quickly. Planche leans are definitely a separate exercise and shouldn't replace any of the progressions shown in BtGB.

I think you're ok going to flat tuck as fast as your muscles let you, but please take your time extending out to straddle :) That's where I got hurt. Same thing with back lever. I was doing full lay back levers long before my elbows were really ready for them. Iron cross, too. So take your time with anything that stresses the inner elbow. That's the bottom line :)

As far as knowing when your joints are strong enough, I'd say that once you've completed a whole SSC with the advanced flat tuck for sets of 10 seconds you should be ready to start extending to straddle. So basically, if you've spent a few months holding advanced flat tuck with locked elbows for 6 sets of 10 seconds, your elbows should be ready to slowly extend to straddle. I may be overly cautious here, but I'd suggest extending out in stages. Maybe 6 inches at a time, spending a month at each stage of extention. Of course, I'm not that flexible in the straddle position so my straddle is not very far from full lay. If you're super flexible and can open more than 130 degrees(I can barely do 90 on a good day) then maybe you'll be fine going straight to straddle, and slowly closing the straddle 3-6 inches per month or something like that.

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Joshua Naterman
Alright so, what is the main difference between doing planche lean pushups, in which your fingers are pointing straight forward like in a regular pushup and you just lean forward as much as you can, and between doing the pseudo-planche pushups, in which your fingers are pointing sort of like to the sides or even backwards? Is the hand positioning the difference here? Because he does 2 types of pushups here: with fingers pointing straight forward, and pointing to the sides.

The only difference is hand position. It is the same movement by name, but the difficulty rises as your fingers start pointing further backward. The reason for that is that when fingers are forward the wrist automatically acts as a cantilever, resisting the upper body being pulled towards the ground. This makes it easier because your muscles have to do less work. As you take away the cantilever action of the wrist you force the muscles to take more of the load, until you have the fingers pointing backwards and the wrist is completely removed from the push up and the muscles are doing everything. Holding a straddle planche with fingers backwards will probably be noticeably harder than holding a full planche with the fingers forward, for example.

As the fingers point backwards there is also more strain on the elbow, which is why it is important to first build strength with whatever finger position you are comfortable in. My wrists hurt when my fingers are forward and I lean past a certain point, so I do them fingers to the side. Just so happens to be a bit harder as well. I could do them on my first knuckle but I'd rather build the extra strength. Once I can do a straddle planche I will slowly start rotating my hands until fingers are back. Until then they stay where they are :)

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Charles Weill

Great video! If your muscles are strong but your ligaments are not, how do you gauge if you are pushing yourself too much in a certain position?

Also did you make a full recovery from you elbow injury?

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Joshua Naterman

Not yet :) I'm still recovering. If you really strain them it takes for FREAKING ever sometimes.

I don't know of an exact quantitative way to guage whether your connective tissue is ready, but if you do a steady state cycle with the planches and are holding yourself in the advanced flat tuck for six sets of 10 seconds, you're probably ready to start training the straddle.

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Longshanks

Good video slizzardman. Cheers for that. If it helps my elbows stopped giving me as much grief when I started using a couple of dumbells as parallets durng my planche leans and just hold the top and bottom of the motion as isometrics. The dumbells aren't anywhere close to rings balance wise but still a little harder on your stabalisers than the floor.

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Joshua Naterman

Glad it's helping! That's a great way to keep training while everything strengthens up, eventually the floor won't give you any problems. Until then, keep on keeping on!

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Chris

Nice vid man, and i gotta say it, darn you're huge! but i think that it makes your dedication to bodyweight training and the progress you make even more impressive

cheerio

Chris

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Joshua Naterman

Thanks, I think the same thing. When I am able to do many of the advanced bodyweight movements it will just go to show that almost anyone can do even the really hard stuff, and that it just takes time and consistency.

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Quick Start Test Smith

My wrists hurt right after I do planche lean push ups despite a thorough warm up. Does anyone here have the same problem?

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Razz

Yes, if they are in the wrong position. Therefore you either have to decrease your lean over your wrist or change your hand position, pain should not be felt in joints during exercise at all.

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Quick Start Test Smith

Thanks, Razz. I'll experiment and see if I can remove the pain by adjusting my hand position, which is usually at the bottom of the rib cage area and with the fingers pointing straight forward.

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Joshua Naterman

It makes a huge difference. I point my fingers out to the side, and even slightly backwards sometimes. My wrists just can't handle the strain of the fingers forward. I'm way too heavy for that. Maybe over time my wrists will get strong enough, but I haven't put nearly enough work into developing that to even try it.

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Kyle Courville

Is there a limit to how far you can lean? After my hands are past my belly button it seems as though more of my weight is above my hands and my feet want to come off the ground, so I end up sliding forward.

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Joshua Naterman

That's when you have to be really careful. The further back the hands get, the more resistance gets added per inch. So where you're at, which is where I'm at, is where you have to really take it slow. You can seriously have your hands about as far back as you want, though I'd imagine that once your wrists move past your center of gravity, which for guys is somewhere around the top of the hips(stick your thumb into your belly button, and keep it there while you touch your fist to your lower abdomen with a straight thumb pointing up, with the tip being in your belly button, that's about where it's at), is going to be the literal balance point. At that point, if you get there(which you will with time and consistency) you can start widening the hands to allow a smaller and smaller shoulder angle. Eventually you can do a floor maltese. It's pretty rare to see, from what I understand, but it's possible.

What's really happening to you is that the resistance is increasing so fast that your muscles(or joints) can't handle it and you collapse forward. With time you'll be able to hold it!

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