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Coleen Vidakovic

Is GST for me?

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Coleen Vidakovic

Hello!  I was intrigued to hear Tim Ferriss's podcast with Coach Sommer. The training sounds fantastic.  Could anyone please advise if this could be appropriate for me.  I have previously been a runner & tri athlete, (with very little flexibility).  I have been a mum and couch potato most recently, and also out of action due to a disc bulge in the Cervical and Thoracic spines in 2010.  Fortunately no surgery need, just bed rest and pilates and all has come good. However I have lost all core strength and stability and don't do any heavy lifting but I have started playing tennis again.  Are there any considerations for taking up the GST training, or am I better to go back to Pilates - I'm a little nervous? Many thanks!

 

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Matic Balantic

That one is a no brainer :P GST! The program is designed to start slow with low number of reps and sets. If you decide to buy Fundamentals, there isn't even a reps/sets prescribed. They are designed to find your deficiencies and slowly prepare you for Foundations training which slowly builds on volume.  You can never be too out of shape to start training and sooner you start, sooner you will get in shape. :)

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Mark Collins

GST would be perfect for you. I was trained in Pilates 15 years ago and used it to my physiotherapy patients. Now I never use Pilates as the GST is far more effective.

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Coleen Vidakovic

Thank you Matic & Mark for your comments!  I am really intrigued now. :)  Wow, can I ask you Mark, the differences you have experienced in comparing Pilates to GST training outcomes, sounds pretty massive? I was thinking of investing in a Pilates reformer, but is that useful given the  benefits you have seen in  GST, or is it still relevant in any situations?  I guess I haven't seen enough of the really basic exercises to really understand the workings of the GST, and the progressions, all the big strength movements are amazing, but I am along way off that, if at all, but very interested to understand it all. Cheers

 

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Eva Pelegrin

Save your money for GST seminar! I'm attending my first one tmw and I already know it won't be my last one. I work with triathletes and moms. I've studied Pilates and a gazillion of things. To be honest, Pilates is over-rated imo. I'm yet to see a client who practices Pilates that has a functional core and can move well. I much prefer Gyrotonic as a discipline as it explores more 3-dimensional movement. Sometimes the tool, in this case, reformer, can be the prison cell from which you see the world. Try GST and see how you like it. You start gradually and build at your own pace. Don't be nervous.;)

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Coleen Vidakovic

Hi Eva, great advise, makes sense! I have seen gyro before,.....thanks a million for posting your reply, I'll look out for a seminar in Australia.  Have a great time tomorrow! Thanks again (smiles & high kicks) :)

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Mark Collins

Pilates is too easy compared to GST. I have found this with physio rehab exercises as well. People do not realise what their body is capable of. GST pushes our body to our genetic potential.

I sold my Pilates reformer years ago and have tried to give away my trapeze table. If you look at the history of Pilates it started for wounded soldiers in WW1. It was designed to get them moving in bed. The floor exercises are a progression from the reformer and trap table. Most people start on the floor and miss the basics. Generally you make more money running a floor class as you can fit a lot of people in a room. Whereas running a class on the reformers is limited by space and the machines are expensive. 

I could perform advanced Pilates exercises but could not finish the first level of Gymnastic bodies exercises. A world of difference. 

For the cost of a reformer you could buy all of Gymnastci bodies programs, 3 seminars, stall bars and some rings and still have money leftvover.

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Noble Redmon

Hi Coleen, I hope you decide to give a GST a try.....    there are 2 affiliates in Sydney.  http://falsegrip.com.au  and https://www.facebook.com/mr.bodyweightmoustache?fref=ts 

I didn't start any type of fitness until I was 53 at after years/decades of being deconditioned (read overweight (30%+ body fat, CHD issues and lower back pain)... after trying CrossFit for a while, I settled on GST. As an engineer by training/profession, GB's Systematic approach follows a simple/logic approach. You start at the beginning  and only progress until your BODY is ready to, not your mind.  Best of luck, Be Well.

 

 

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