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Spencer Kelleher

Work Capacity and Endurance vs. Strength as a Beginner

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Spencer Kelleher

Hello I have some questions for you all.

 

I have read in a previous thread that it is suboptimal to be resting less than 3 minutes between sets if you are trying to develop maximal strength, because the right energy system doesn't have time to regenerate or something or other. So what I would like to know is:

 

1. Is this actually true in context for beginners? For example would you not get stronger at vertical pulling on a basic exercise like pull-ups if you do not rest longer than 3 minutes. I would prefer some anecdotes by more experienced amateur gymnasts/actual gymnasts on here or perhaps some research so that I may cite it elsewhere.

 

2. What determines whether an exercise should be focused on for strength or endurance? If I am progressing from pull-ups to weighted pull-ups and eventually one arm pull-ups or the rope climb so many people like here, how do I determine whether it should be considered for endurance or strength?

 

3. Does work capacity naturally improve as maximal strength increases or must it be trained individually? Referring once more to the pullups, if I progress from pull-ups after training it with strength in mind and eventually reach some analagous one armed equivalent, will I able to do many more pull-ups than I had been able to before even if I only trained with a strength perspective since that progression?

 

4. SHOULD beginners focus more on endurance or strength? This questions is a result of a post I found on this forum implying that maximal strength in a movement must be mastered before endurance is even attempted.

 

I have read a post from coach sommer here about how his athletes are able to do like 50 pike presses in a row or something or other. So basically the point of question 3 is whether or not this work capacity is a result of individualized endurance training or mostly a result of large maximal strength training

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Chris Garay

Hi there,

 

Lots of back and forth on this topic on the forum already, and I suggest you search for further reading. Briefly, your body will adapt to the specific demands you impose upon it. Also, the amount of rest needed between sets depends largely upon the individual's work capacity, the exercise, and the intensity (i.e., the load or weight).

 

This is why Foundation includes short rest periods: as it is designed for beginners in GST, work capacity and relative strength are being developed concurrently. Once you progress to more advanced rings work, for instance, then you would most likely take a longer rest between your (maximal strength) sets.

 

Best,

Chris

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Spencer Kelleher

hello . thank you for your response. the threads that you have mentioned, I have attempted to find using search keywords such as "rest time", but I am not finding alot of relevant information as most of the threads are about a different topic. If you could direct me towards the relevant threads that you may know of or have participated in I would appreciate it. However if these topics exist in one of the premium forums I cannot access them.

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Alessandro Mainente

More and more time experts on gymnastics and strength training said that not specific and advanced protocol could be used if there is a low work capacity. One of the best benefits of work capacity is doing more work in less period and prolonged work. prolonged work has some beautiful consequences like more blood flow over tissues, more connective tissue IGF-1 production. all these factores contributes to joint conditioning, GST is all about prepare your joints for more advanced work. btw what i've noticed with some mine friend who do calisthenic is a total absence of work capacity. during the last masterclass coach Sommer provided us a very good warm up. for me is warm up, for my friend is the death of the training session. their performance drastically drops down after the warm. basically different way to train and different result on physique, they eventually cannot hold my rings session.

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Spencer Kelleher

Well I know work capacity is important but I would like to know the part rest time between sets plays in its development, a topic that I have not seen elaborated on yet. Does coach sommer have the people at his seminar or his beginning athletes rest between sets? Also I am interested in optimization and to what extent work capacity is recommended to be developed. I dont have Foundation and dont have the money right now but some general information on recommended rest times would be nice.

 

Chris I checked the first two threads you linked and searched for information on this particular topic but I did not find it.

 

Oh and my goals are to get stronger, and to get more work capacity. So if anyone is wondering what I am hoping to achieve, the best I can get from both worlds basically.

 

Edit: Chris I have not ignored what you said about how the needed rest time varies with the person and the intensity, I'm just seeing if anyone can elaborate on that further. I'm doing the best I can to design a routine.

Edited by trouble tomato

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Kate Abernethy

Funnily enough I came across this paper whilst browsing yesterday and found it an interesting read, and partially related to this thread.

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Jason Berger

Well I know work capacity is important but I would like to know the part rest time between sets plays in its development, a topic that I have not seen elaborated on yet. Does coach sommer have the people at his seminar or his beginning athletes rest between sets? Also I am interested in optimization and to what extent work capacity is recommended to be developed. I dont have Foundation and dont have the money right now but some general information on recommended rest times would be nice.

 

Chris I checked the first two threads you linked and searched for information on this particular topic but I did not find it.

 

Oh and my goals are to get stronger, and to get more work capacity. So if anyone is wondering what I am hoping to achieve, the best I can get from both worlds basically.

 

Edit: Chris I have not ignored what you said about how the needed rest time varies with the person and the intensity, I'm just seeing if anyone can elaborate on that further. I'm doing the best I can to design a routine.

Given your goals are to be stronger with more work capacity, do them with compressed (minimal) rest times. The adaptations that happen with 3-5 min rest times are more of a concern if you're trying to become an elite strength athlete, imo, and even the soviets and Westside guys found they had to work in General Physical Preparedness (GPP) for their elite numbers to keep rising. Training for both will certainly NOT inhibit your strength gains, if that's what you're worried about. It's not like these are grueling conditioning workouts: these are grueliing strength workouts.

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