Jump to content
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...
novice299

How to get to maltese

Recommended Posts

novice299

Hello everyone,

 

I`m a new guy around here, and just to introduce myself-

 

I`m currently 16 years old, and I have absolutely zero experience with any gymnastics. I`ve never done gymnastics in my entire life. In fact I was only introduced to gymnastics on rings (never used rings btw) a few weeks ago. Actually, I started weightlifting a few months ago, and recently I started researching about strength exercises about weightlifting, and through my research I saw some strength exercises on rings. These looked much cooler, and better to me than weightlifting exercises (bench press, deadlift, squat, etc.). Thus, I`m wanting to switch over to strength exercises on rings, as they interest me much more. I came across a strength move on the rings a few days ago called ``Maltese``, and it appealed to me a lot. I started researching about how to do it, and everything I found talked about how difficult it is. I asked a few people if I can ever get to it, and they said I probably can`t as I have zero experience with rings (and gymnastics) in general. This kind of discouraged me, and I`m starting to think that it`s pretty much worthless to even try as I probably can`t even make it (as most of the people who can do it have probably been training since they were much younger than me). 

 

From further research I found this forum, and I think this is the right place to start. Would you guys say that a 16 year old who has zero experience with rings and gymnastics will ever be able to do the ``Maltese`` on rings?

 

Thank you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Rajesh Bhat

Yup. Get your hands on a good program like foundation or kilroy70.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Connor Davies

Regardless of whether you make it or not, it's still worth it to TRY. The simple act of working toward it will pay of hugely regardless of whether or not you ever reach your goal.

Maltese however is very very hard. By the time you get there you will have to have mastered back lever, planche and iron cross. To get to these you'll probably need to master skin the cats and ring handstand first. This necessitates learning a handstand at the very least.

So for now, I would suggest working on your handstand and basic straight arm conditioning. Depending on your level this could be as simple as support holds, straight arm planks and foot supported German hangs.

It's a long, long road ahead of you, but I'm pretty sure you can make it if you really try.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ivan Pavlovic

I know a guy who started with GST 5 years ago at age 20 and he can now do straddle maltese (not perfect form but it is maltese).

Ring work is not reccomended for begginers so i would not reccomend to start training on rings for i while.

Spend a lot time on this forum reading all kind of stuff to understand some things about skills which you want to get. Also if you dont have problem with money you can buy coach Sommers book "building the gymnastic body" which contains a lot information about gymnastic strenght training (as far as i hear).

And if you simply dont have nerves to read all this i would reccomend you to get Foundation courses since it is the simplest and the safest way to progress in GST.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Joshua Slocum

I started gymnastics at 17. Had a maltese at ~23. You can do it with consistent hard work! Just remember that you can *not* rush development of straight-arm rings strength. You need to build up joint and tendon strength, and that takes time - much more time than building the corresponding muscular strength.

Foundation would be an excellent place to start if you can afford it.

  • Upvote 10

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Dylan Robertson

Joshua, how far along into the courses are you?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
novice299

I heard that the the 'Iron Cross' is a prerequisite of the 'Maltese'. So, I'm thinking about starting from the 'Iron Cross'. I read prerequisites of the 'Iron Cross', and the 3 common ones I found were- front level, back lever, and muscle up. So, should I start from these 3? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Dorian Brown

I don't have any ring skills but I would also strongly suggest foundation. Ring techniques are not just cool moves you go out and do. It takes time and hard work. If you rush into it you will probably injure yourself or create disfuction elsewhere in your body. It can be annoying taking things slowly but its for the best.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Cole Dano

I heard that the the 'Iron Cross' is a prerequisite of the 'Maltese'. So, I'm thinking about starting from the 'Iron Cross'. I read prerequisites of the 'Iron Cross', and the 3 common ones I found were- front level, back lever, and muscle up. So, should I start from these 3? 

 

No - those prerequisites are intermediate level you need to do a lot of preliminary work before that. Iron Cross places an huge load on your elbows and biceps and shoulders, you need to very systematically build up the strength in order to safely hold IC. 

  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Alessandro Mainente

there is no better thing that smash you EGO in the ground and do what you need to do, and not what you want.

Is by far more frustrating to begin something advanced and then stop for an injury compared to use your time to build up the necessary physique and then train without any problems.

  • Upvote 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Edgar Hernandez Celli

I suggest to start from the beginning. The F1 and H1 courses will help achieve your goals. This may look very basic, but to build over something you need a solid foundation.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
novice299

Alright guys. I guess I'll start from the very basics, and then build up to the Iron Cross. However, I have 2 questions-

 

1) I can't afford the Foundation series or anything else (and won't be able to for a while), so what should I do meanwhile?

 

2) Will weight be an issue for eventually learning the Iron Cross? I heard that lighter people find it easier (150 pounds and below), and I'm 170 pounds. So, do I have to reduce my weight before beginning Iron Cross training?

 

Thanks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Farid Mirkhani

I heard that the the 'Iron Cross' is a prerequisite of the 'Maltese'. So, I'm thinking about starting from the 'Iron Cross'. I read prerequisites of the 'Iron Cross', and the 3 common ones I found were- front level, back lever, and muscle up. So, should I start from these 3? 

And those 3 have their own prerequisites, and so on..

 

It's a tough world, kid. But you can do it if you start from the beginning and work your way up. Don't worry about time as you have no controll over it other than doing your best everyday.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Alessandro Mainente

The weight is not a problem, at certain point the cross sectional area of a muscle is relevant to build up more strength. loose a weight is a shortcut that will no condition you joints.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Connor Davies

I can't afford the Foundation series or anything else (and won't be able to for a while), so what should I do meanwhile?

I'm pretty sure I already outlined this for you in my previous post in this very thread.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Cole Dano

Alright guys. I guess I'll start from the very basics, and then build up to the Iron Cross. However, I have 2 questions-

 

1) I can't afford the Foundation series or anything else (and won't be able to for a while), so what should I do meanwhile?

 

2) Will weight be an issue for eventually learning the Iron Cross? I heard that lighter people find it easier (150 pounds and below), and I'm 170 pounds. So, do I have to reduce my weight before beginning Iron Cross training?

 

Thanks.

 

There is simply no way to put a person on the track to learning Maltese without them having some form of coaching, which NEVER comes free. The GB program is not only almost certainly gong to be more well thought out than most adult club gymnastics programs it is also far more economical. 

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Alexander Egebak

If you cannot purchase the programs there are pretty comprehensive articles on this website if you search for them. You would want to read the stickies and some of the most "liked" posts on here.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Please sign in to comment

You will be able to leave a comment after signing in



Sign In Now

×

Important Information

Please review our Privacy Policy at Privacy Policy before using the forums.