Jump to content
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...
Bob Hamlin

Start F1/H1 with rotator cuff tendonitis?

Recommended Posts

Bob Hamlin

Hi all,

   I'm thinking of purchasing F1 and H1, but have concerns about a shoulder injury.  I'm 50 years old, and have spent the last year or so rehabbing some pretty bad rotator cuff tendonitis and biceps tendonitis (anterior shoulder pain).  I've come a long way and for at least 9 months have been back to weightlifting, handstands, frog stands, front lever work, etc.  The tendonitis is still there, but I'm learning to manage it.  I'm told it will never heal completely mostly due to inadequate blood flow to those areas.

   My real concern is with dips.  This post by Eric Cressey explains it very well: http://www.ericcressey.com/baseball-strength-training-programs-dips (That's me in the comments asking about muscle-ups, and being told directly to never do dips again.)  Eric is generally very concerned about any movement that puts the elbow behind the body as this aggravates the anterior shoulder capsule.  It's certainly a problem for me.

   Part of me is optimistic that with slow and proper progression I can get back to doing dips pain-free, but another part of me knows that is very unlikely.

   So, does F1 make any sense at all if one can't do dips?  On the other hand, is F1 the real road to recovery?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kate Abernethy

Hi Bob, I'm nearly 48 and have a shoulder (right side, throwing arm) issue like yours (anterior shoulder pain) from an injury 20yrs ago. I strongly believe form and control and slow but sure progression are key to managing it - along with having a good massage therapist and gentle stretching. Addressing all items in point 2. of the article you linked to is also compulsory :-)

I would say that following F1 and H1 makes great sense and that you should try the dips progressions - with extra care, slower progression and obviously with no pain. From my own experience I got as far as Dips progression no.11 before my right shoulder blew up - I had overdone it on volume and form wasn't great. That was in November and now I have worked steadily back up to progression no.3 pain free.

So go slow and steady ( hard when you're older and feel time is running out, I know), listen well to what your shoulder is telling you, and good luck.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Bob Hamlin

Thanks a lot LateStarter, I certainly appreciate the feedback.  Your comments about the dips progressions are especially helpful.

 

I plan to do exactly what you suggest - give it go and take it slow.  I've been told by several doctors, physical therapists and trainers that my shoulder tendonitis will never heal, but it has improved.  With the right progressions, why shouldn't that improvement continue?

 

I'll probably also re-post this in a member forum to see if I can generate a bit more discussion.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Joseph Blazuk

Tendons heal and actually need the proper stress to do so.  Lost cartilage cannot be repaired (at least not well, not yet).  I would do a proper rehab program with a PT if you haven't already.  If you're continuing to have issues at 9 months, it's worth getting an MRI or ultrasound.  There are regenerative type injections that can be done that are still considered experimental that have decent evidence to stimulate healing in chronic tendinopathies.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Bob Hamlin

Some very good points here.  Tendons do heal and stress is a catalyst.  I've seen and used successful protocols for patellar and achilles tendinitis that rely on eccentric movement.  I wonder why no research has been done in this area for rotator cuff.  Maybe eccentrics here are just too complicated?  I may try some experimentation.

Yes, I have been to several doctors and several PTs, and had MRIs as well.  Most of it has made me worse.  The only thing that has helped has been coaching and custom programming from Eric Cressey, a strength and conditioning coach who specializes in baseball players so really knows the shoulder.  I've never heard of these regenerative injections but I'm definitely going to look into that.  Thanks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Please sign in to comment

You will be able to leave a comment after signing in



Sign In Now

×

Important Information

Please review our Privacy Policy at Privacy Policy before using the forums.