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Jesus Rojas

Ideal vertical jump for a 1.67m guy

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Jesus Rojas

After seeing those vertical jump videos from Pat Mendes I was thinking, what could be a decent, good and ideal vertical jump for a 1.67m, 63kg individual and what could be a precise way to measure a vertical ?. Thanks

 

https://www.facebook.com/video.php?v=526142200853326&set=vb.346432665490948&type=2&theater

 

Edited by chuchodani
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Biren Patel

I think ~40 inches would be pretty beast

I recall coach saying a jump onto something chest high is expected for his athletes.

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Jesus Rojas

I think ~40 inches would be pretty beast

I recall coach saying a jump onto something chest high is expected for his athletes.

 

 

Thanks for the information ! I think the last jump is pretty much at chest height

 

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Blairbob

@ 1.67m shoot for at least 24" which is 60cm. That shouldn't be too much of a problem. Making a goal of 75cm isn't exactly unreasonable. I think bare minimum you would want to hit is something like 18" or 37.5cm. Most of my preteen gymnasts were between 12-18" or 25-37.5cm and were a bit over 5' at most. Just intermediate to optional level.

 

Those P(arallel) Blocks in the Senders video are 2'x3'x4'. Or they generally are depending on manufacturer.

One of the issues of someone shorter like you is that your achilles tendon is probably not going to be very long, some of this dependent on your ethnicity and genes, blah blah blah. Obviously I'm a short sawed off hobbit but I always liked comparing VJ to gymnast height as a ratio than using absolute values. If I remember correctly, the achilles tendon contributes about 25% of the force of a VJ if I remember the literature correctly. Nothing you can really do about this. So for myself trying to VJ the same height as my WL friend who is 5'10" is not exactly the same ballgame.

 

Basically one of the general ways to do it is the mark on a wall method. Stand next to a wall and stretch your arm overhead and mark it. Then do a jump and mark the wall in the air. Measure the difference. Don't angle the marking instrument. Often we use a bit of chalk on the fingertips.

 

My friend likes to do these standing jumps landing on top of an object with straight legs. Similar to a box jump but you have to land on top with straight legs.

Here is some data. Bare in mind, average height in the US is 5'9" for males, and 5'3" for females (or used to be last time I looked it up). 1.75m and 1.6m.

7025617_orig.jpg

8529333_orig.jpg

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Sam Rea

I think ~40 inches would be pretty beast

I recall coach saying a jump onto something chest high is expected for his athletes.

That's not really the same thing though is it? Box jumping is as much about active tuck compression as vertical jump. Not saying that it's not valuable, just that the two aren't directly comparable. I agree though - a one metre standing vertical would certainly be impressive.

 

As regards measuring, the simplest way is to jump and touch a target at a known height - like Pat does in the video. Subtract your vertical reach from the height of the target and you have your vertical jump height. Obviously you need a bit of fine-tuning to find the height you can only just manage. Kind of like in a high jump competition.

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Jesus Rojas

That's not really the same thing though is it? Box jumping is as much about active tuck compression as vertical jump. Not saying that it's not valuable, just that the two aren't directly comparable. I agree though - a one metre standing vertical would certainly be impressive.

 

As regards measuring, the simplest way is to jump and touch a target at a known height - like Pat does in the video. Subtract your vertical reach from the height of the target and you have your vertical jump height. Obviously you need a bit of fine-tuning to find the height you can only just manage. Kind of like in a high jump competition.

Thanks for your help ! I think if your Box jumping is powerful, then your vertical jump would be powerful too, there has to be some transference.

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Jesus Rojas

@ 1.67m shoot for at least 24" which is 60cm. That shouldn't be too much of a problem. Making a goal of 75cm isn't exactly unreasonable. I think bare minimum you would want to hit is something like 18" or 37.5cm. Most of my preteen gymnasts were between 12-18" or 25-37.5cm and were a bit over 5' at most. Just intermediate to optional level.

 

Those P(arallel) Blocks in the Senders video are 2'x3'x4'. Or they generally are depending on manufacturer.

One of the issues of someone shorter like you is that your achilles tendon is probably not going to be very long, some of this dependent on your ethnicity and genes, blah blah blah. Obviously I'm a short sawed off hobbit but I always liked comparing VJ to gymnast height as a ratio than using absolute values. If I remember correctly, the achilles tendon contributes about 25% of the force of a VJ if I remember the literature correctly. Nothing you can really do about this. So for myself trying to VJ the same height as my WL friend who is 5'10" is not exactly the same ballgame.

 

Basically one of the general ways to do it is the mark on a wall method. Stand next to a wall and stretch your arm overhead and mark it. Then do a jump and mark the wall in the air. Measure the difference. Don't angle the marking instrument. Often we use a bit of chalk on the fingertips.

 

My friend likes to do these standing jumps landing on top of an object with straight legs. Similar to a box jump but you have to land on top with straight legs.

Here is some data. Bare in mind, average height in the US is 5'9" for males, and 5'3" for females (or used to be last time I looked it up). 1.75m and 1.6m.

7025617_orig.jpg

8529333_orig.jpg

Very informative post ! Last time I was able to hit approx 60cm but maybe it was bad measured, I'm going to measure it again. Thanks !

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Jan Reipert

A 40 inch vert is absolutely elite level

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Biren Patel

That's not really the same thing though is it? Box jumping is as much about active tuck compression as vertical jump. Not saying that it's not valuable, just that the two aren't directly comparable. I agree though - a one metre standing vertical would certainly be impressive.

 

Yea you are right! Thank you for the correction

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Jesus Rojas

I just test my standing vertical jump, with a reach of 218cm with the arm extended overhead, I was able to touch a objective at a height of 273cm which means my standing vertical jump is 55cm.

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Bryan Wheelock

Are the figures in the chart in centimeters or inches?

Find it really hard to believe half the population over 22 can jump 31 inches.

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GoldenEagle

Are the figures in the chart in centimeters or inches?

Find it really hard to believe half the population over 22 can jump 31 inches.

The charts are in inches. The NSCA, where the charts originated, is a 501( C )(3) "Not for Profit" organization located and founded in Colorado Springs, Colorado, United States.

 

For the sake of information:

 

1 inch = 2.54 cm or 25.4mm

 

1 foot = 30.48 cm or 304.8mm (12in multiplied by 2.54 or 25.4)

 

3.28 ft = 1 meter

 

1m = 100cm or 1000mm

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Bryan Wheelock

The average NBA pro vertical jump is 28 inches.

The best vertical jump (no step) result from the 2012 NBA pre-draft combine camp was 38 inches.

 

Average Vertical Leap of NCAA Div. 1 Football player: 29-31 inches. 
Average Vertical Leap of NCAA Div. 1 Basketball player: 27-30 inches

 

That chart is wrong. The average is more like 20 inches for a 20 y.o. male.

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GoldenEagle

The average NBA pro vertical jump is 28 inches.

The best vertical jump (no step) result from the 2012 NBA pre-draft combine camp was 38 inches.

 

Average Vertical Leap of NCAA Div. 1 Football player: 29-31 inches. 

Average Vertical Leap of NCAA Div. 1 Basketball player: 27-30 inches

 

That chart is wrong. The average is more like 20 inches for a 20 y.o. male.

Read the left side of the NSCA chart.

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Jan Reipert

Basketballers players dont have the best verticals jumps though:

a) they simply dont need it because they are giants anyway

b) their sport is not solely based on explosive power

Im pretty sure you will find the most freakish verts in the nfl. There you have 100kg/220lbs guys having 40inch verticals or linemen running 40yd in sub 5s. The amounta of power these guys generate is just mindblowing

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Jay Bailey

They're still professional athletes, though. That chart suggests that the average male over 22 can jump higher than the average professional NBA player. That's ridiculous, even if they never train for jumps a day in their lives. Either the chart's wrong, the basketball info is wrong, or we're reading it wrong.

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gcv

Impressive but this is not a true vertical jump measure. This is more a test of rapid hip flexion along with hip mobility/flexibility at the bottom of a squat position.

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Arthur Wong

Some chinese(?) weightlifters doing the vertical jump:

 

Impressive to say the least!!

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6GR-eRCQEHc

Korean

 

the small guys jumps look so smooth and effortless like hes flying lol

 

when I finish SLS and FLS my new goal is to build at least a 25" vertical for no reason

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Kasper Stangerup

As far as I can see, the chart above doesn't actually say which group has been measured. Sure, it's a percentile distribution of jumps made by males, but it doesn't say if it is perhaps the averages of powerlifters or if it is the general population (I teach statistics, and this kind of thing is one of my pet peeves. Please excuse).

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GoldenEagle

As far as I can see, the chart above doesn't actually say which group has been measured. Sure, it's a percentile distribution of jumps made by males, but it doesn't say if it is perhaps the averages of powerlifters or if it is the general population (I teach statistics, and this kind of thing is one of my pet peeves. Please excuse).

One correction regarding your issue with the chart. The top of the charts is "...male, by age" or "...female, by age." Going off of the age groups listed, I wouldn't be surprised if the data is from primarily the general population?

 

Please by all means direct your chart related issues and questions toward the fitness and wellness non profit organization which published the data.

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Kasper Stangerup

Very likely, the sub-group would be apparent from the context in which the document originally appeared (I haven't checked). What I am saying is that we need more information if we are to infer anything from it. 

 

Also, I note that there are many things about the chart that are a little off. For instance, the order of the numbers in the intervals denoting the jumping ability of a given percentile (where an interval is given and not just a discreet number) is backwards. Likewise, the inequality in the header of the coloumn furthest to the right is facing the wrong way. These things, while not important in themselves, imply that if the authors are wrong about these fundamentals, then maybe they are also wrong about other things. Things such as the finer points of correct sampling procedure, or maybe design of experiments. 

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GoldenEagle

Very likely, the sub-group would be apparent from the context in which the document originally appeared (I haven't checked). What I am saying is that we need more information if we are to infer anything from it. 

 

Also, I note that there are many things about the chart that are a little off. For instance, the order of the numbers in the intervals denoting the jumping ability of a given percentile (where an interval is given and not just a discreet number) is backwards. Likewise, the inequality in the header of the coloumn furthest to the right is facing the wrong way. These things, while not important in themselves, imply that if the authors are wrong about these fundamentals, then maybe they are also wrong about other things. Things such as the finer points of correct sampling procedure, or maybe design of experiments. 

Okay, that is nice. Feel free to discuss the chart with the publisher.

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