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Edoardo Roberto Cagnola

How long I will work on Foundation 1?

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Edoardo Roberto Cagnola

I'm thinking about purchasing Foundation 1 (I know there's the package with all 4 levels, but first I want to try the program and see if I like it). However, how long will take me (approximately, I know it's personal) to master the Foundation 1 movements? I'm not in a rush, I'll take all the necessary time to do this well, it was just to have an idea!

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GoldenEagle

Time varies between individuals.

Some will take a year some will take more than a year. The time it takes you depends on variables that only you can decided upon.

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Jonathan Pettit

Optimistically, assuming one month to master each progression, you could finish it in six months.  That assumes you are a super-stud with equal parts strength and mobility.  For many people, acing the mobility aspect is what keeps them from advancing.  I didn't realize I had tight shoulders until I began working H1 (honestly, I didn't know shoulders COULD move that way).  It will likely take me months to get up to snuff, but it could take a year for all I care.  Being able to do that is a reward in of itself.

 

I will say this: no one ever says, "Boy, I'm glad I waited to start Foundation."  Progress is often slow, but it's still progress.

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Edoardo Roberto Cagnola

Thanks for the inputs! I'm pretty sure I'll purchase Foundation 1 at the end of summer, when hopefully my lower back injury will be completely healed! A part from the cost benefits, do you guys suggest go with the whole package or purchasing just Foundation 1 to try it and see how it works?

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Toni Laukkavaara

Depends on your strength and mobility mane

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Alessandro Mainente

it takes the time it needs. i don't like measure the progress basing upon a time. this does not makes sense.

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hype

Time varies between individuals.

Some will take a year some will take more than a year. The time it takes you depends on variables that only you can decided upon.

If you don't like the program there is a 30 day money back guarantee.

One year just to complete F1? I read all foundations could be completed in 2 years..

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Alan Tseng

One year just to complete F1? I read all foundations could be completed in 2 years..

It is very likely to take more than a year to complete F1.  As for me, I don't see myself completing Foundation in 2 years, it'll take me however long it takes

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Jon Douglas

If you're strong and mobile you can demonstrate passing it in a week. Taking a year is somewhat extreme and reflects an underlying Issue that needs addressing. I've yet to see anyone demonstrate that nothing in F1 can challenge them at all, but I think its possible if you've been doing your homework.

A couple years for the whole series is about right ime, depending on where you start, but for most I think F1 will be the longest. If you are mobile hard working and uninjured could be very quick.

Its on you to show you can do it all perfectly and move on. Objective performance will tell you how long you spend, not general advice :) theres no point getting caught up in worrying about 'how long' because from the get-go you have your progression target. Time only comes into play when you can't immediately demonstrate mastery, requiring planning to ramp up to that standard over the weeks :)

Edit;

That two years-ish figure is a bit ambitious for an adult beginner; I'm not sure most adults could go from F1 to manna holds in that time. IMO I'd tack another 6-12 months spent on manna specifics, but the rest is about right. I expect to have most of them by the time the two year mark comes up, and plenty of people are ahead of me :)

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Sam Rea

If you're strong and mobile you can demonstrate passing it in a week. Taking a year is somewhat extreme and reflects an underlying Issue that needs addressing. I've yet to see anyone demonstrate that nothing in F1 can challenge them at all, but I think its possible if you've been doing your homework.

A couple years for the whole series is about right ime, depending on where you start, but for most I think F1 will be the longest. If you are mobile hard working and uninjured could be very quick.

Its on you to show you can do it all perfectly and move on. Objective performance will tell you how long you spend, not general advice :) theres no point getting caught up in worrying about 'how long' because from the get-go you have your progression target. Time only comes into play when you can't immediately demonstrate mastery, requiring planning to ramp up to that standard over the weeks :)

Edit;

That two years-ish figure is a bit ambitious for an adult beginner; I'm not sure most adults could go from F1 to manna holds in that time. IMO I'd tack another 6-12 months spent on manna specifics, but the rest is about right. I expect to have most of them by the time the two year mark comes up, and plenty of people are ahead of me :)

I agree with this in general, but IMHO, the timescales given are very optimistic for the average person. Of course if you're working hard and making progress then it shouldn't matter, but it's a natural question before starting a course to ask how long it will take to complete it.

 

When asked this question in a recent podcast, Coach answered "18 months to 2 years on average" (I can't quote verbatim, since the recording is not up anymore, but he was referring to F1 and not the whole of Foundation. I checked). This sounds realistic, since there are few people who post regularly on the forum who started F1 with no background in GST and have progressed all of their elements to F2, although several are close.

 

If you are coming to the program with the mobility of a child and a reasonable level of relative strength then a year, or less, would be realistic. Otherwise I would argue that 'underlying issues' are the rule rather than the exception for the vast majority of adults, whether they know it or not. The good news is that, whatever your mobility/strength issues, foundation will go a long way towards rooting them out and forcing you to fix them.

 

I get the impression that by the time you have completed F1, you will have already tackled your biggest deficits. This should mean that, upon starting F2, you will have a similar level of strength and mobility as others at the same level and progress should be more predictable. This is not the case when you start F1 however, as it has no pre-requisites.

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Murray Truelove

I'm doing the Foundation and Handstand courses. I've been training about 1.5 years and I'm about halfway through F1, the biggest thing holding me back is mobility and flexibility, both of which have always been terrible for me - I was literally the most inflexible person I knew.

I've still got a lot of work ahead of me but I've made tremendous progress (as far as I'm concerned at least), my biggest accomplishment so far as probably been getting the necessary shoulder mobility in H1. I'm overall stronger and more flexible than ever before and I owe that to Gymnasticbodies.

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Mikkel Ravn

I'm 15 months into foundation and has finished F1 except for MN/PE6, which I will be on for a very long time indeed. Once again, it is poor mobility that is the culprit.

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Andrew Graham

Yer it's different for different people's physical levels. I was on F1 for 4 months, I've now been F2 since March and on some elements I'm almost done. I had my SLS quite quickly and I've never had mobility problems.

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Alexander Egebak

Yer it's different for different people's physical levels. I was on F1 for 4 months, I've now been F2 since March and on some elements I'm almost done. I had my SLS quite quickly and I've never had mobility problems.

Get out of here :D

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Andrew Graham

No I'm being totally honest, before I started F1 I could perform a full pancake, pike, handstand and shoulder dislocates, I did gymnastics and martial arts in college and have always made sure I had optimal mobility. Movement and mechanics are of great interest to me. Hollow body rocks PE6 endurance was the big one for me on F1.

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Sam Rea

So if you can already do virtually everything in F1, then it shouldn't take you very long to complete F1 ;)

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Scott Pelton-Stroud

Given my lack of deficits in mobility, I now feel a good bit worse about my minimal progress over 6 months  :(

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Murray Truelove

Given my lack of deficits in mobility, I now feel a good bit worse about my minimal progress over 6 months :(

No way, man. Getting flexible or whatever after its been a real struggle feels great.

Progress has been slow for me but now I'm getting past those hurdles it's only made me work harder and really appreciate what was missing from my training.

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Scott Pelton-Stroud

Sorry! My phrasing was poor. I meant to say that I do not really have any issues with mobility. Still have have some work for the flexibility on dislocates, as well as pancake and splits, but my pike is pretty good, and I can do a full bridge.

 

Obviously much work left, but mobility is not an issue for me in F1! Strength definitely is though...

 

Edit: So the point of my last post was to say that since the things that seem to make others take a long time with F1 are mobility issues and I don't have much of those, I feel worse about my slow progress through F1 (since I have only been having fitness issues).

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Anze Merhar

Sorry! My phrasing was poor. I meant to say that I do not really have any issues with mobility. Still have have some work for the flexibility on dislocates, as well as pancake and splits, but my pike is pretty good, and I can do a full bridge.

 

Obviously much work left, but mobility is not an issue for me in F1! Strength definitely is though...

 

Edit: So the point of my last post was to say that since the things that seem to make others take a long time with F1 are mobility issues and I don't have much of those, I feel worse about my slow progress through F1 (since I have only been having fitness issues).

Hey, I'm in the same boat as you are! My biggest struggle is my strength, since I started with very little of it, whereas the mobility exercises aren't really a big problem.

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Andrew Graham

In my honest opinion, you shouldn't feel bad at all... F1 deserves the time and discipline. F2 is slightly shorter than F1 and F3 and F4 are shorter still. To answer the original question, don't focus in the time it takes....just buy it because it's the best training you can do!...period!! You say you're not in a rush but subtle undertones suggest u r wiling to buy the foundation program by measuring yourself up to someone you don't know just because they did in a quick time frame. Even if you are mobile enough and strong enough...u still have to prove it on the course and forfill the requirements l that allow you to progress to the next stage.

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Konstantin Nikkari

One year just to complete F1? I read all foundations could be completed in 2 years..

There is four foundations and minimal time it takes to complete each is 6 months (4x6months = 2 years). Then there is possibility to make one mastery week and one deload week and that would half your time. But I don't really believe that there is someone who could do that unless he is already a graduate gymnast.

 

I'm (now definately but also when I started F1) in better shape than average. I have worked for 7 months now for F1 and just passed the mid point.

 

In couple of months I might be able to start some movements from F2. I do know for me Side Lever progression is the slowest as Arch Body Holds and Rocks have been extremely tough for me.

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Jon Douglas

What are we now, about 18 months in?

As a very untalented person and physically somewhat of a slow learner, albeit with passable flexibility on starting and a good work ethic/love for challenges, I've finished SLS and am winding up FL, RC, SL, Mn. I was 'fit' (competitive kicboxing/NHB, RKC style kettlebelling for a couple years) but a joke by GST standards when starting. Certainly a joke by my standards now :) A year or so on the WoDs here put a bit of muscle on me but I lost flexibility and gained strength very slowly. Too hard for me, I guess.

 

Fast forward to Foundation and training at my actual level, and improvements have been consistent from the day I began, although they have not been equal or linear, with periods of working away at it fruitlessly and big leaps as I passed major roadblocks, especially in mobility. As an adult student I have too much to work on to expect it to be easy or easy to plan :)

 

I see no reason someone reasonably fit and with a bit of talent couldn't do it in 2 years as an adult. Less if they are better prepared or younger (generalising as having fewer mobility issues to address)

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Marios Roussos

I think that describing yourself as "Joe Average" on this forum may discourage people who don't advance at the pace you did Jon. Although you may think you started with average ability, you clearly did not in that you showed mastery for all F1 elements other than RC:PE6 within the first month that F1 was released. To this day, I haven't read of anyone on this forum who progressed as quickly as you. Just face it already, you're a freak :)

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Coach Sommer

Jon is not a physical freak. In fact, with no disrespect to Jon, he is not even close to being a gst 'freak'.

Jon is talented, but his is not an overwhelming talent. I would have ranked Jon in the top 15-25% of the GB seminar he attended, but there were other students present who were far stronger and more advanced than Jon. Jon's progress to date is the result of character; meaning his relentless will, dedication and consistent application of the GB training principles

As I have always told my athletes, 'Hard work beats talent when talent doen't work.' If you are not making the progress you would like to make, you need to ask yourself, is it because you lack talent - or because you lack character? And then most importantly ..... what are you going to do about it?

Yours in Fitness,

Coach Sommer

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