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Mikkel Ravn

Most efficient way to get into a handstand?

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Mikkel Ravn

I'm going to increase my handstand volume significantly, since I'm beginning the freestanding HBP progressions in the foundation series, in addition to H1. Therefore I would like to know which method is most efficient for entering a handstand. I haven't got a press handstand yet, so that's out.

 

My only reliable means of getting into a handstand is squatting down, feet together, knees between my straight arms, hands shoulder width apart, kicking up into an open tuck, straightening legs, sucking in ribs and opening shoulders. As you can imagine, this is a bit elaborate, so while it may work fine for five sets of max holds, it may be too involved for doing many reps.

 

Am I better of using the 'gymnast method' (for lack of better nomenclature) of raising arms overheads, bending down on one leg, with the other straight in line with the torso and kicking up? Haven't got much experience with this approach, as I was advised against it in a beginner's handstand class. I assume that this method should be part of one's skill set.

 

Side question: As described above, I straighten my legs, then suck in the ribs and open the shoulders. I suspect that as I improve, this should all occur simultaneously, right?

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Merunas Astrauskas

Am I better of using the 'gymnast method' (for lack of better nomenclature) of raising arms overheads, bending down on one leg, with the other straight in line with the torso and kicking up? Haven't got much experience with this approach, as I was advised against it in a beginner's handstand class. I assume that this method should be part of one's skill set.

 

I would assume you were advised against it because it is very easy to kick too hard overbalance and fall over. This might be dangerous to beginners who don't have a solid hadstand yet and don't know how to bail out. Personally I think it is easy to learn if you can handstand already. Start out slow, better to underkick than overkick (both will happen :) ) This is a skill so just spend some time experimenting and you will be fine. 

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Alessandro Mainente

The best way is what Ravn expressed, notice that you need to assume the bodyline before reach the handstand, this means hollow position, elevation, head in, arms straight during the lunge.

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Connor Davies

Walk up a wall and then walk out....

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Daniel Burnham

Yep, lunge/kick to handstand is the easiest way to get there after you have gotten the form correct on the wall.

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Timothy Aiken

Something I think Mats Trane posted a while ago which has helped me tremendously in having consistent kick ups is to kick with your shoulders slightly in front of your hands. That is, if you're kicking up from rest with your hands already on the floor.

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Biren Patel

to add another tip to aiken's post, something I learned from ernesto sarabia is to kick up one leg into correct hs line and find your balance. then bring the other one slowly up.

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emos

to add another tip to aiken's post, something I learned from ernesto sarabia is to kick up one leg into correct hs line and find your balance. then bring the other one slowly up.

 

I would echo this. Some people will do it naturally but others need to consciously lead with one leg... and then bring the other one up.

 

I spent years (think about that, YEARS) unable to get more than about 10% of attempts into a balanced position, because I wasn't doing this. None of the good handbalancers I knew ever mentioned it - as usual the people who progress the fastest inevitably missed out on many of the problems encountered by people who progress more slowly, so they often don't understand or notice and can only advise us to "keep trying" or some other hollow idea. I learned this tip from someone who was not a very good handbalancer. Just like me!

 

That said, maybe it's not a relevant point for you (OP) in particular, so keep collecting ideas from different sources and use what works.

 

 

^ a bit of rant, but I like to mention this issue when possible, as it's what I wish I had understood earlier myself.

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Biren Patel

I would echo this. Some people will do it naturally but others need to consciously lead with one leg... and then bring the other one up.

I spent years (think about that, YEARS) unable to get more than about 10% of attempts into a balanced position, because I wasn't doing this. None of the good handbalancers I knew ever mentioned it - as usual the people who progress the fastest inevitably missed out on many of the problems encountered by people who progress more slowly, so they often don't understand or notice and can only advise us to "keep trying" or some other hollow idea. I learned this tip from someone who was not a very good handbalancer. Just like me!

That said, maybe it's not a relevant point for you in particular, so keep collecting ideas from different sources and use what works.

Yes, lol, I also spent years doing this. Had this discussion with others involving more than just gymnastics and equilibre. Any sport, it's important to NOT automatically think of a good student as a good teacher. Sometimes we would ask the advanced people how they got their splits. "umm I don't know I just kept trying and got it in a few weeks". "oh, I just warmed up really good one day and then suddenly did a backflip." It's the Nike mentality of Just Do It. Those are not the people to learn anything useful from. It's a hard journey to find a good teacher like Coach Sommer or people who gain success by starting from adulthood at the bottom of the pile, like Yuri or Mikael. But in times when you don't have a teacher like that I agree that often learning the nuiances and fine details of a movement come from the people just as horrible as us! :) Thank you every body for being crap at what you do!

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Mikkel Ravn

Yes, lol, I also spent years doing this. Had this discussion with others involving more than just gymnastics and equilibre. Any sport, it's important to NOT automatically think of a good student as a good teacher. Sometimes we would ask the advanced people how they got their splits. "umm I don't know I just kept trying and got it in a few weeks". "oh, I just warmed up really good one day and then suddenly did a backflip." It's the Nike mentality of Just Do It. Those are not the people to learn anything useful from. It's a hard journey to find a good teacher like Sommer or people who gain success by starting from adulthood at the bottom of the pile, like Yuri or Mikael. But in times when you don't have a teacher like that I agree that often learning the nuiances and fine details of a movement come from the people just as horrible as us! :) Thank you every body for being crap at what you do!

You're welcome.

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