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ForzaCavaliere

Reverse Planche!? Street Workout vs Gymnastics

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Frahebede

The transition of the one arm MU looks like it requires more technique than strength. He also did use some substantial momentum just before the transition with that giant kick and the transition was a jerking motion.

 

How long did you also see Ð”митрий Кузнецов hold a maltese?

Yeah I do agree it requires a lot of technique for the OAMU but compared to others on youtube, he does it with much better form.

Heres a couple videos of Ð”митрий Кузнецов and you can see how easily he's holding them. Also he does the best one arm planche i've ever seen in the second video and also presses from laying on the ground with straight arms to maltese. Sadly, theres not many videos of him on youtube =(

This is his second round of the day:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0UGxxR6Y5OI

And heres his first round:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qihn3fE-x5w

 

 

 

 

 

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Mikael Kristiansen

The 1 arm planche there isnt too good. I have seen him do better. He flags too much still because he lack control of 1 arm handstands, though he is ridiculously strong. 

 

This is how it should look. This guy is a total mutant.

 

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=106186206120759&set=pb.100001881410883.-2207520000.1378678473.&type=3&theater

 

1.33 is one of the best I have seen on video

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Brian Li

Yeah I do agree it requires a lot of technique for the OAMU but compared to others on youtube, he does it with much better form.

Heres a couple videos of Ð”митрий Кузнецов and you can see how easily he's holding them. Also he does the best one arm planche i've ever seen in the second video and also presses from laying on the ground with straight arms to maltese. Sadly, theres not many videos of him on youtube =(

This is his second round of the day:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0UGxxR6Y5OI

And heres his first round:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qihn3fE-x5w

It looked like he held it for 8 seconds and I'm not sure if it was to failure. He is undoubtedly very strong, but I don't think you can say that the average top street workout athletes are as strong as the average elite gymnasts if we include rings specialists if you haven't seen what they truly are capable of. I hear many high level rings specialists use extra weight in their ring routines during training and I've heard of gymnasts who can hold a maltese for 15 or 20 seconds as well as iron crosses for 40 seconds to over a minute.

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Brian Li

Gymnastics has formally been at it since 1881 (132 years!); you really expect street workout can teach them something?

It's like a high school math club wondering why the academy of science does not consult with them!

 

To be fair though, "street workout" is pretty old too. It could possibly be almost as old as when playgrounds were invented. I'm not saying that they can teach gymnastics a thing or too, but they are certainly not something that just came into existence recently except for popularizing it through the internet.

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FREDERIC DUPONT

(...) certainly not something that just came into existence recently (...)

 

Indeed, there are accounts of the Spartan soldiers doing their "gymnastics routine" before going into battle 2,300 years ago... :)

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Connor Davies

Indeed, there are accounts of the Spartan soldiers doing their "gymnastics routine" before going into battle 2,300 years ago... :)

Well, calisthenics really.  And they were laughed at for it before they KILLED EVERYONE.

 

Although I've heard of roman soldiers training on rings, so the rings must be a couple thousand years old...

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Frahebede

 I've heard of gymnasts who can hold a maltese for 15 or 20 seconds

 

Thats incredible, but I thought full planche record was like 25 seconds or something so if someone can hold a 15-20 second maltese then it seems like they would be able to beat the planche record by a lot. Also I heard from someone that can do both maltese on rings and maltese on floor say that maltese on floor was much more difficult than on rings. Is this true? Also I think i read somewhere that someone achieved maltese on rings before planche on rings so I always thought maltese on floor was more difficult than on rings. So which one is easier for most people, rings or floor?

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Joshua Slocum

Thats incredible, but I thought full planche record was like 25 seconds or something so if someone can hold a 15-20 second maltese then it seems like they would be able to beat the planche record by a lot. Also I heard from someone that can do both maltese on rings and maltese on floor say that maltese on floor was much more difficult than on rings. Is this true? Also I think i read somewhere that someone achieved maltese on rings before planche on rings so I always thought maltese on floor was more difficult than on rings. So which one is easier for most people, rings or floor?

 

Maltese, planche, and maltese on floor are very different skills. They have some carry over, but not a whole lot. Gregor, who used to frequent this forum, and could do an Azarian maltese, couldn't hold a planche at all. Many gymnasts can do a rings maltese but not a floor maltese; I know at least one street workout athlete learned a floor maltese before a rings maltese. So they all require a tremendous amount of strength, but they're different enough that some specific training is needed to for each. 

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Brian Li

It was Gregor who I remember said he held a maltese for 15 or 20 seconds before. I heard Yan Mingyong can hold a full planche for 30 seconds.

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Frahebede

Thanks for clearing that up and wow 30 seconds full planche the front lever world record is only 33 seconds - zalimhan kambalov but actually Roman Myagkov has the unofficial front lever record of 39-40 seconds.

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Jon Douglas

Thanks for clearing that up and wow 30 seconds full planche the front lever world record is only 33 seconds - zalimhan kambalov but actually Roman Myagkov has the unofficial front lever record of 39-40 seconds.

I'd be surprised by that... wasn't there a few climbers that had a minute FL?

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Deins Drengers

I would love to hear an opinion from Coach and Joshua Naterman :)

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Kim Jongseong

Look guys. This is ridiculous. Elite gymnasts do some serious stuff like ring maltese as a skill. Come on! As a skill!! This doesn't mean the Russian guy isn't strong though.

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ForzaCavaliere

@Richard, 

 

what do you mean as a skill? You mean it's not a strength element?!?!?

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Coach Sommer

... but actually Roman Myagkov has the unofficial front lever record of 39-40 seconds.

 

Actually I am sure that there are many better front levers than this.  Allan held a 30s front lever at about 7 years old.

 

Yours in Fitness,

Coach Sommer

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3bears

The reverse planche is an amazing accomplishment, but the athlete demonstrating it has severely atrophied legs: it's not something that can be accomplished by a person with normal musculature. You don't see gymnasts doing that because you can't do gymnastics without working legs. 

 

The one-armed muscle up is done with a massive kip. And it's been done by many people (just search youtube). 

 

The CTI video is in all likelihood a fake. 

 

The street workout community has produced some fantastically strong individuals. And the free-form nature of the sport leads to people seeking unique skills to differentiate themselves. However, hypothesizing that the average street workout proponent is stronger than an elite gymnast is frankly ridiculous. Most of them can't even hold a cross. As of about a year ago, Ð”митрий Кузнецов couldn't hold a maltese on rings (there was a video of him trying: he arched like hell and basically just fell through). Also, I've never seen any street workout athletes press from floor maltese to Japanese handstand, yet that's not an exceptionally rare move among elite gymnasts. 

How would you know athlete has "severely atrophied" legs??

He's wearing big pants by the way.

Some people have thin but amazingly strong legs.

Sorry, having fat looking legs doesn't help in cranking out weighted one legged pistols on unbalanced surface, amazing jumps, etc.

I truly hope this guy's training is all about strength and skills and not "hypertrophy", hope he's brighter than that.

Anyway, there's no such thing as "normal" musculature. My. Olympia isn't a standard. People are different (thanks god).

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3bears

Mad respect to all calisthenics, "street workout", "ghetto workout" and "gymbarr" people.

One's good at what they're traing for...train for specific skill=be good at that particular skill, not at ones you're not training for. There's no gold standard or prescribed strength "measurement".

I don't care how strong you think you are and how long you can hold iron cross: there's always a skill, such as hard circus skill that you don't have. There's always a mountain or rock you just won't be able to climb. There's always a better fighter who'll beat you up. No need to compare.

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Frahebede

Actually I am sure that there are many better front levers than this.  Allan held a 30s front lever at about 7 years old.

 

Yours in Fitness,

Coach Sommer

That very impressive especially at 7 years old! But I can't seem to find any info on anyone ever holding a front lever more than 30 seconds, even elite climbers.  So far I haven't heard of anyone breaking 35 seconds besides Roman.

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Coach Sommer

That very impressive especially at 7 years old! But I can't seem to find any info on anyone ever holding a front lever more than 30 seconds, even elite climbers.  So far I haven't heard of anyone breaking 35 seconds besides Roman.

 

For the most part I suspect that this is due to its being an "A" level strength part and most gymnasts have no interest in spending a great deal of time on an entry level GST strength element after they have moved up to working more advanced strength skills.

 

Yours in Fitness,

Coach Sommer

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Coach Sommer

... No need to compare ...

 

Philosophically you may be right, however the social reality is quite different.  People always compete one with another.  We have an innate need to compare ourselves and our accomplishments with our peers and to be publically recognized for that effort.  

 

Which is why a gold medal at the Olympics holds so much prestige. In terms of athletics it is the top of the mountain; physically, mentally and socially.

 

Yours in Fitness,

Coach Sommer

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Joshua Slocum

How would you know athlete has "severely atrophied" legs??

He's wearing big pants by the way.

Some people have thin but amazingly strong legs.

Sorry, having fat looking legs doesn't help in cranking out weighted one legged pistols on unbalanced surface, amazing jumps, etc.

I truly hope this guy's training is all about strength and skills and not "hypertrophy", hope he's brighter than that.

Anyway, there's no such thing as "normal" musculature. My. Olympia isn't a standard. People are different (thanks god).

He is a prominent athlete in the street workout community. The state of his legs is well known. 

 

Whether the term 'normal' has any meaning when applied to musculature is frankly irrelevant. The point is that he has something like 30-60 pounds less weight to hold in that position.

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Frahebede

For the most part I suspect that this is due to its being an "A" level strength part and most gymnasts have no interest in spending a great deal of time on an entry level GST strength element after they have moved up to working more advanced strength skills.

 

Yours in Fitness,

Coach Sommer

I agree, I wonder how long Danny Rodriguez and others with victorian can hold a lever.

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Joshua Slocum

I agree, I wonder how long Danny Rodriguez and others with victorian can hold a lever.

I'm not sure which 'others' you're talking about :P

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Yaad Mohammad

I've seen a video of a guy holding the front lever for 54 seconds. Can't find it anymore. Point being, 30 seconds really isn't the record.

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Michaël Van den Berg

Re: front lever holds. I'm sure Cisco can hold one longer than 30 seconds - here he's holding one for 28 seconds with only two fingers (four years ago):

 

 

Check his other videos, he's also a true OAC beast and he has FL rope climbs as well: http://www.youtube.com/user/ableteam/videos

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