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Gregor

Trazition from maltese (swallow) to inverted cross

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Coach Sommer

Gregor,

Was the lower score a result of an error (a fall or missed element) or simply poorer execution overall than you had hoped for?

Yours in Fitness,

Coach Sommer

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Gregor

Big mistake at the jonnason, so they didn't recognite it and big deduction+not so clean execution as I can do.

If I would done as good as I did two weeks and a half before at a Slovenian Cup, I would be in finals...

I was quite disapointed at my place and my execution.

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Gregor

Last week I started my trainings after a short break.

First training was catastrofically bad!!! I could hold the iron cross for only 5 sec and low maltese for 3 sec. :shock:

Today was much better, all holds much easier, made a pike press from azarian to inverted cross, also made a slow back roll to maltese (F),...

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Coach Sommer

While the short-term affect on your strength and timing can sometimes be quite annoying, in the long-term occassional breaks in training allow the body (and mind) to rest, heal and rejuvenate. Active rest seems to be especially helpful. For example, Allan was on vacation last week; he spent the entire week surfing. I expected him to return happy, but worn out and with timing off. Yesterday he came into the gym and hit routines on high bar and pommel horse in one try. The other athletes on team, and myself, were surprised to say the least.

Yours in Fitness,

Coach Sommer

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Gregor

Yes I know, previous years I did have an active break. But this year...Let say, at the end I was so mentaly burned I couldn't do a routine, without a mistake (always forgot elements in routine, mixed elements for example: 1. and 3.), I've got lost in the air dismount. So I had it enough....

Now it's all ok, and all back to normal :D

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Coach Sommer
Let say, at the end I was so mentaly burned I couldn't do a routine, without a mistake (always forgot elements in routine, mixed elements for example: 1. and 3.), I've got lost in the air dismount. So I had it enough....

Yes, it does indeed sound as though you were seriously over trained. It is good to hear that you are feeling much better now.

The following are some tips that I use with my upper level athletes to avoid overtraining and routine stagnation which you might find useful. I am sure that you all already familiar with most, if not all of them. Sometimes however in the heat of competition we forget the advantages of these simple lessons.

1) My athletes perform routines year round. This avoids that unpleasant 4-6 week period where the athlete struggles to build endurance.

2) The quality of an acceptable routine will however depend on the time of the year and where we are in the competitive cycle in regards to the National Championships.

3) Basic swing refinement continues year round. In fact there are focus days where little else will be done on that particular event. The effects of a continual refinement of basic swing on routines, even for already champion-level athletes, can be dramatic.

4) I have found that learning new skills year round, either in the beginning stages of development or in final refinement, acts as a tonic both physically and psychologically. For my upper level athletes, there is always work being done on new skills currently not in routines, but which are under development for inclusion within the next 6-12 months or sometimes even longer. For example, Allan worked his Heli on parallel bars for nearly two years before it was inserted into a routine.

5) It is important to remain mindful of the fact that the only facet of the competition which you have control over is your own performance. Worrying about elements of the competition over which you have no direct control (equipment, competitors, order of competition etc etc etc) is incredibly draining mentally. Your best will either be good enough or it won't. If not good enough, learn from the experience and go back to the drawing board.

6) Strive to enjoy the training process. I have noted countless incidents (from the youngest compulsary athlete to athletes preparing to compete at the Olympic Trials) where the athlete and coach were so focused on obtaining a particular outcome that they in fact lost sight of why they had begun training in the first place; the pure joy of gymnastics.

Yours in Fitness,

Coach Sommer

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Gregor

I started my routines in Januar up to middle June (at the end 5 routines per week+all strength and technic training). Thing that was the most annoying thing was, I was most prepaired befor Europeans(I didn't get in the A - Team), but I got sick and right after sickness I injured myself...

We also noticed we have had to less basic swing practice. So we started at the beginnig now, added more shoulder flexibility (poor flexibility), more ring handstands,...AND WE ADD ONE MORE STRENGTH TRAINING DAY, at least for two month and we will see how will goes.

Today I had second strength training. It was much more better then I was expected. I felt verry tired at the begining, after a few minutes I just exploded and training was PURE PLEASURE :D

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