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Guest Chiflado

Hanging Leg Lift

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Guest Chiflado

I'm am working on the hanging leg lift, trying to follow Coach Sommer's article. I can do the hanging tuck L for 10 seconds easily (assuming I have correct form... actually I guess since in the planche and front lever progressions sinnce you are supposed to work up to 1 min, I had been holding it for one minute. Although I don't think I had correct form the whole time like my legs proobably went down some. But I think I could hold with correct form for 10.) However with the regular L I cannot hold my legs parallel to the floor. So how do I train to progress to the regular L? Do I just push as much as I can straining to keep my legs straight and bring my legs parallel to the floor for 10 seconds?

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Edward Smith

personally i've always been able to do an L-sit so i haven't trained any of the following to be able to do an L-sit:

-hanging tuck L weighted

-slowly extending your legs out, your shins are now at 90 degrees to your thighs, move them out to about 135 degrees work that up to ten seconds then move them out some more until you get a full L-sit

-dish holds

- ab wheel

-other ab exercises

that's about all for now, if there's anything giving you trouble with it don't hesitate to ask

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George Launchbury

Hi Chiflado,

Have you tried it with one leg in tuck, and other extended? I have been experimenting this as an interim for the L-sit on paralettes. Don't forget to work both sides! Also you could start in tuck, and work slow reps of straightening legs as much as you can without losing the hip angle and good lower back postion?

With me, the main problem seems to be more hamstring flexibility rather than ab/hip strength?

One of the things I do to help this issue is: I lie flat on my back (concentrate on keeping lower back flat) and with toes pointed and legs locked I do some "Lying L-sit" holds trying to get past L-sit position. I then lower down nearly to ground, and repeat until I cannot hold form. Holds are around 10-20 seconds at the moment, and am aiming to progress until position is looking something more like a V-sit angle at the hip!?

I feel this working in my abs, hip flexors, lower back and quads. I hope this will (since I am using antagonistic muscles) help with lengthening hamstrings as well.

I have to point out that I am a newbie, so maybe some more experienced people should comment on this before putting too much effort into any of my cunning plans?

:)

Cheers,

George.

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zennode

One way to help train the hanging L sit is to just hang and pull your legs up as far as you can and then lower and repeat. This will help build the hip flexor muscles. Also you should do knees to elbows. I do not have a good video up yet, but will in a couple days so I can post it for you then, but for now just think hanging in a tuck and pulling up your knees to touch your elbows, but make sure that you do not throw your head back, keep your eyes focused forward.

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Scotty Hagnas

I find that poor flexibility in the hamstrings and low back to be the more common limiting factor in a "L" sit. I have many of my trainees stretch the pike position prior to "L" sit training. I require an ability to hold a proper "L" sit as one of many requirements to get into my advanced classes. This one thing limits many otherwise "fit" athletes - and has worked wonders to motivate them to stretch.

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zennode
I find that poor flexibility in the hamstrings and low back to be the more common limiting factor in a "L" sit. I have many of my trainees stretch the pike position prior to "L" sit training. I require an ability to hold a proper "L" sit as one of many requirements to get into my advanced classes. This one thing limits many otherwise "fit" athletes - and has worked wonders to motivate them to stretch.

I would also say that not only is it hamstring flexibility but the hip flexors. I find that is where a lot of people are limited.

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kbryk

Some pike stretching would help a lot, first time I tried a leg lift it went extremely well for me, I started off with V-sits 3 sets of 12, then I increased to weighted V-sits 3x12. V-sits helped me a lot with hip flexor strength leading up to the leg lift, so train hard with V-sits for a few weeks and you will notice an increase in strength in your leg raises.

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Scotty Hagnas
I would also say that not only is it hamstring flexibility but the hip flexors. I find that is where a lot of people are limited.

Agree fully. Flexibility and strength of the hip flexors is usually lacking. Another drill that I like in this regard is static holds in the top and bottom positions of the pistol, with leg extended.

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Guest Chiflado

Thanks all for the replies! Yesterday was my rest day and today I have the hanging leg lift in my regimen. I'm going to have my brother with me to watch my form and make sure my shoulders don't go back... I'm going to go fr the regular L. We'll see how it goes.

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kbryk

Trust me, before leg raises all I did was V-sits and the first time I walked up to a high bar and tried leg raises I was able to do 2x10 without to much work. So try some V-sits and weighted V-sits you will be surprised how well they help in many things.

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Guest Chiflado

For the V-sit, is this what you're talking about?

(The last variation that he does...)

I went for the L today, but didn't have anyone watching me... I did ok... I think.... don't think I had perfect form but sometime I'll have to have someone watch me. Afterwards I did some "Lying L-Sit"s.

Thanks for your help everyone!

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kbryk

Well the V-sits I do aren't crappy lol, try to start off in the hollow body position then touch your toes then go back into hollow body; that is one V-sit. You should also work the hollow body position it will help too.

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Paul

I've always known them as V-Ups. Here's another example. http://www.exrx.net/WeightExercises/Rec ... WtVUp.html

There always seems to be lots of names for the same exercise with bodyweight stuff. :)

As kbryk says, they will help you a lot. When I started doing hanging leg raises a few years ago I could barely manage one but by doing stuff like the V-Ups and hollow holds it didn't take long. I started off doing leg raises hanging from a bar without very strict form and then with a stall bar to keep good form and then weighted ankles with the stall bar.

Like a lot of people I took up bodyweight exercises after reading Coach Sommer's Olympic Bodies article on Dragondoor and transformed myself from a 200lb butterball into a 140lb lean machine with just my bodyweight and a pair of rings. Really glad to find this website. :D

Paul.

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