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Jordi Van Gelder

Planche problem

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Jordi Van Gelder

Hey,

I just want some help on the planches, i can do front lever, back lever, almost iron cross, but the planche its impossible for me. I do only flat tuck, and a few seconds. And if i try it on the PB, its more difficult. Also push ups in tuck possition are really hard to do. I read something about " hollow " but don't know exactly what it is, its important to get the planche?

Thank you very much,

Regards.

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Falcon

Can you hold tuck PL for 60 seconds?

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Philip Chubb

If your form is good and you can't do the adv tuck very long, then you need to go back to the tuck and get your times higher. When you have built up volume there, I am sure you will see a new PR when you go back to adv tuck.

If your form isn't good or you're not sure, post a video.

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seiyafan

For tucked PL, will the feet come off the floor once you lean forward enough, or do you need to actively lift them off the floor?

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Jordi Van Gelder

I think i cannot hold a 60 seconds tuck planche, so yes maybe i need to train more this possition. I'll try to upload a vid soon. Also maybe could be good to do lower back exercices?

Thank you.

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Falcon
I think i cannot hold a 60 seconds tuck planche, so yes maybe i need to train more this possition. I'll try to upload a vid soon. Also maybe could be good to do lower back exercices?

Thank you.

Your lower back is ok, your shoulders are weak.

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seiyafan

mostly anterior deltoid

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Jordi Van Gelder

Yeah but for example, also its hard for me to do tuck planche to handstand, so there the problem its in the lower back, or thats what i think.

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Mikael Kristiansen

No, this is one of the most common misconceptions about planche. Even a planche press to handstand is almost all shoulders, biceps, and scapula. There is no more strength required in the lower back to do a full planche than to do a full back lever. If you can do a reverse leg lift and hold your body straigth, which is very simple for even untrained people, the lower back strength is there.

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Niels Joergensen
No, this is one of the most common misconceptions about planche. Even a planche press to handstand is almost all shoulders, biceps, and scapula. There is no more strength required in the lower back to do a full planche than to do a full back lever. If you can do a reverse leg lift and hold your body straigth, which is very simple for even untrained people, the lower back strength is there.

+1 very well covered!

Work on your scapula strength and stability. Protraction of scapulae is the key to the planche, that's what will enable you to do the planche, not core exercises. mobilize your scapula by band to start with and familiarize yourself with the various scapula movements: (protraction, retraction, elevation depression) ( look up Ido Portals video for that).

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Jordi Van Gelder

Thank you very much guys.

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Brian Li
No, this is one of the most common misconceptions about planche. Even a planche press to handstand is almost all shoulders, biceps, and scapula. There is no more strength required in the lower back to do a full planche than to do a full back lever. If you can do a reverse leg lift and hold your body straigth, which is very simple for even untrained people, the lower back strength is there.

Wait so having enough strength to execute a reverse leg lift is all that is needed of the lower back to hold a full planche? I know it is mostly anterior delts and maybe chest and lats for the planche and back lever, but I thought it still takes a considerably decent amount of lower back strength too. Is there a bodyweight or gymnastic exercise that works the lower back very hard? Oh and I would assume it will take the same amount of lower back strength for the maltese as well and the same amount of ab strength for victorian compared to front lever, is that right?

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Jordi Van Gelder

Also i don't know why i find so hard to do exercises on PB, planche for example, and hspu incredible hard, any idea?

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Niels Joergensen
No, this is one of the most common misconceptions about planche. Even a planche press to handstand is almost all shoulders, biceps, and scapula. There is no more strength required in the lower back to do a full planche than to do a full back lever. If you can do a reverse leg lift and hold your body straigth, which is very simple for even untrained people, the lower back strength is there.

Wait so having enough strength to execute a reverse leg lift is all that is needed of the lower back to hold a full planche? I know it is mostly anterior delts and maybe chest and lats for the planche and back lever, but I thought it still takes a considerably decent amount of lower back strength too. Is there a bodyweight or gymnastic exercise that works the lower back very hard? Oh and I would assume it will take the same amount of lower back strength for the maltese as well and the same amount of ab strength for victorian compared to front lever, is that right?

A weighted reverse leglift is a good one.

I can't hold a maltese yet, but I don't feel it's my lower back that's the weak link at all! my elbows primarily is. same for victorian It's not really an abdominally dominent strength position

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Niels Joergensen
Also i don't know why i find so hard to do exercises on PB, planche for example, and hspu incredible hard, any idea?

Given the lack of information presented it's hard to give an accurate suggestion to why you have difficulties with those things. More info is needed to give a possible explanation to what your weak links may be

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Jordi Van Gelder
Also i don't know why i find so hard to do exercises on PB, planche for example, and hspu incredible hard, any idea?

Given the lack of information presented it's hard to give an accurate suggestion to why you have difficulties with those things. More info is needed to give a possible explanation to what your weak links may be

Well, for example i can do hspu on the floor, but not in pb. Maybe its why the pb changes de position of elbows, and my triceps are weak in this move.

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Niels Joergensen
Also i don't know why i find so hard to do exercises on PB, planche for example, and hspu incredible hard, any idea?

Given the lack of information presented it's hard to give an accurate suggestion to why you have difficulties with those things. More info is needed to give a possible explanation to what your weak links may be

Well, for example i can do hspu on the floor, but not in pb. Maybe its why the pb changes de position of elbows, and my triceps are weak in this move.

Just to clarify. on floor is called a Hespu, not hspu. that's because it's not full RoM on floor. On pb you can do hspus because you can get full RoM with the bottom portion being a shoulderstand. a HSPU is a lot more difficult than a Hespu! over time increase the RoM in your Hespu and you will get there.

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Brian Li
No, this is one of the most common misconceptions about planche. Even a planche press to handstand is almost all shoulders, biceps, and scapula. There is no more strength required in the lower back to do a full planche than to do a full back lever. If you can do a reverse leg lift and hold your body straigth, which is very simple for even untrained people, the lower back strength is there.

Wait so having enough strength to execute a reverse leg lift is all that is needed of the lower back to hold a full planche? I know it is mostly anterior delts and maybe chest and lats for the planche and back lever, but I thought it still takes a considerably decent amount of lower back strength too. Is there a bodyweight or gymnastic exercise that works the lower back very hard? Oh and I would assume it will take the same amount of lower back strength for the maltese as well and the same amount of ab strength for victorian compared to front lever, is that right?

A weighted reverse leglift is a good one.

I can't hold a maltese yet, but I don't feel it's my lower back that's the weak link at all! my elbows primarily is. same for victorian It's not really an abdominally dominent strength position

I know the core is not the prime mover or the most dominant in the maltese and victorian compared to the shoulder girdle muscles. I haven't tried a maltese yet, but how does it feel on your chests, shoulders, and traps?

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Niels Joergensen

Haven't trained it for a while now, but the elbows are definiately the most strenous joint for me in the maltese. shoulders and pecs are of course very taxed as well. every bodypart is, but for me it's mainly shoulders and elbows.

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Jordi Van Gelder
Just to clarify. on floor is called a Hespu, not hspu. that's because it's not full RoM on floor. On pb you can do hspus because you can get full RoM with the bottom portion being a shoulderstand. a HSPU is a lot more difficult than a Hespu! over time increase the RoM in your Hespu and you will get there.

Oh....hah didn't know that. Anyway when i do on the pb, if i reach the bars with the head ( thats the same that the floor on hespu ) then i cannot push up.

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Niels Joergensen
Just to clarify. on floor is called a Hespu, not hspu. that's because it's not full RoM on floor. On pb you can do hspus because you can get full RoM with the bottom portion being a shoulderstand. a HSPU is a lot more difficult than a Hespu! over time increase the RoM in your Hespu and you will get there.

Oh....hah didn't know that. Anyway when i do on the pb, if i reach the bars with the head ( thats the same that the floor on hespu ) then i cannot push up.

Again it's almost impossible to give a good answer to that over the internet. paralettes vs. floor are different supports which could mean you have to get used to parallettes. difficult to say. post a video that will make it easier to tell what's wrong

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Coach Sommer
... when i do on the pb, if i reach the bars with the head ( thats the same that the floor on hespu ) then i cannot push up ...

Your ability to perform a HeSPU on the floor, but not on the parallets indicates a lack of triceps strength. The parallel grip of the parallets requires significantly more triceps activation.

Yours in Fitness,

Coach Sommer

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Jordi Van Gelder
... when i do on the pb, if i reach the bars with the head ( thats the same that the floor on hespu ) then i cannot push up ...

Your ability to perform a HeSPU on the floor, but not on the parallets indicates a lack of triceps strength. The parallel grip of the parallets requires significantly more triceps activation.

Yours in Fitness,

Coach Sommer

As i thought. Thank you!

I will try to do the hspu on the minute 0:37 of this vid

but assisted of course. What muscle is working at the lowest part of this movement?

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seiyafan
Maybe the progression from Ido Portal can help you. https://www.facebook.com/note.php?note_ ... 9012181420

Wonderful! I tried that, and I could hold a tucked planche for 3-4 seconds. Before I could not even hold a fog stand for more than 5 seconds without falling. That feeling that as you are leaning forward and your tucked feet start to get lighter and lighter and all of a sudden they are off the floor is just so wonderful, I am simply speechless.

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