Jump to content
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...
Dillon Zrike

Scapula position for basic and static exercises

Recommended Posts

XxBAMFxX
Check previous page:
Push up: You are starting with scaps somewhat protracted but not fully protracted (Unless you want to, which is a good idea because you integrate full ROM serratus work this way), and straight arms. From here, as you approach the ground your serratus stays active so that your scaps stick to the ribcage as they retract smoothly in accordance with the motion. At the bottom they will be close to fully retracted. The reverse happens as you return to starting position (adding a full protraction at the top would be ideal, as that is true serratus work as long as you are keeping the shoulderblade stuck to the ribcage).

btw: I never thought that you should protract at the top of the dips...this applies to ring support as well, right?

Thanks. What do you think about doing protracted pushups (where scapula is protracted 100% of the time)?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
George Vere
Check previous page:
Push up: You are starting with scaps somewhat protracted but not fully protracted (Unless you want to, which is a good idea because you integrate full ROM serratus work this way), and straight arms. From here, as you approach the ground your serratus stays active so that your scaps stick to the ribcage as they retract smoothly in accordance with the motion. At the bottom they will be close to fully retracted. The reverse happens as you return to starting position (adding a full protraction at the top would be ideal, as that is true serratus work as long as you are keeping the shoulderblade stuck to the ribcage).

btw: I never thought that you should protract at the top of the dips...this applies to ring support as well, right?

Thanks. What do you think about doing protracted pushups (where scapula is protracted 100% of the time)?

The should be allowed to retract somewhat - otherwise at the bottom the scapula can't stay against the ribcage and will go into anterior glide.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Joshua Naterman

For all who may have missed it, the pictures on the planche lean article in the beginning should now be fully viewable. It is now the Original Post.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Matt R

I never thought I would have a problem with my shoulders, I used to be able to do 80+ pushups in under 2 minutes, 20+ dips on the dip station at my gym easily, and overhead press my bodyweight for a grinding triple. But whoa, lately, it seems my right side is the only one that is working. I have looked at some pictures of scapular winging but still can't decide if that is what it is....

 

My left trap is very tight, my right lat looks like its bigger than the left, and I can hardly do a set of 30 pushups without my shoulders starting to sting with pain. How do I know that my Serratus is activated? Is there a certain feeling to it?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Joshua Naterman

You have more going on than problems with serratus.

 

It is not easy to find people who can properly assess that kind of thing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Rik de Kort

Your best bet is to see someone who can diagnose you in real life. Sports doc or something. The shoulder is a tricky thing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Connor Davies

So, if a good planche lean is hollow, how come most of the planches I see on youtube are arched?  When exactly does the switch happen?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Rik de Kort
So, if a good planche lean is hollow, how come most of the planches I see on youtube are arched?  When exactly does the switch happen?

Most of the 'planches' on YouTube  aren't planches.

  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Joshua Slocum

Because most of the body weight strength community has lower standards. This is not to imply that the BTGB community is 'better'. It's just that BTGB is based directly on the sport of men's artistic gymnastics, and in MAG, a planche with an arched back will receive points deducted for poor form.

Why is an arched back considered poor form? Because it makes the planche significantly easier.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Brian Li
Why is an arched back considered poor form? Because it makes the planche significantly easier.

As well as unaesthetic!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Joshua Slocum

<blockquote class='ipsBlockquote'data-author="B1214N" data-cid="93988" data-time="1358116274"><p>

As well as unaesthetic!</p></blockquote>

Also true. It's quite ugly. Which is why you also want your legs together and your feet pointed. And why similar form recommendations go for handstands and levers, too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Coach Sommer
... Why is an arched back considered poor form? Because it makes the planche significantly easier ...

 

It is not only significantly easier; a poorly performed planche (without protracted and depressed scapula) also fails to prepare the body for more advanced GST exerises.

 

There is a reason that this section of the forum is titled "Foundation".   ;)

 

Yours in Fitness,

Coach Sommer

  • Upvote 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Connor Davies
There is a reason that this section of the forum is titled "Foundation".   ;)

Hell, the whole book is "Foundation" :lol:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tor

So, I'm a newbeginner in the terms of bodyweight training, 50/50 the past year. This year I'm going all inn with 90/10 with focus on bodyweight training.

Now I simply love this one.. This is exactly what I need. Actually, I'm going to live in this subforum for awhile, sucking up and testing information. I'm that lucky guy who discovered this before he "began" the planche and front lever training. Damn!

Just want to give a shutout to all people contributing in a professional and dumbed-down way for new beginners like me to understand. Without you guys people like me would have gotten nowhere.

 

So thanks, much appreciated!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Nick123

So when I lean into a tuck planche.. just like what Dillon said.. I simply lift my toes and it works.. but my question is my hip is still not level with my shoulder... is this normal? or should I try to learn forward a little more to level my hip with my shoulder?  According to the book, my hip need to be at shoulder height is that correct?  Sorry, I'm kinda new at this. Thanks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kim Jongseong
So when I lean into a tuck planche.. just like what Dillon said.. I simply lift my toes and it works.. but my question is my hip is still not level with my shoulder... is this normal? or should I try to learn forward a little more to level my hip with my shoulder?  According to the book, my hip need to be at shoulder height is that correct?  Sorry, I'm kinda new at this. Thanks

You don't lift your toes. You lean forward with "protracted scapula" and toes are naturally lifted at some point. I'll tell you two points you should concern.

 

1. lock your torso as a hollow body. In case of tuck planche, flat back is not necessary but try not to arch your back.

2. There is no lifting in planche. Focus on "leaning"

 

If you try to learn forward more to level your hips with your shoulder, you may end up with advanced tuck planche and you don't want that. Instead try to hunch your upper back. 

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Nick123
You don't lift your toes. You lean forward with "protracted scapula" and toes are naturally lifted at some point. I'll tell you two points you should concern.

 

1. lock your torso as a hollow body. In case of tuck planche, flat back is not necessary but try not to arch your back.

2. There is no lifting in planche. Focus on "leaning"

 

If you try to learn forward more to level your hips with your shoulder, you may end up with advanced tuck planche and you don't want that. Instead try to hunch your upper back. 

Thank you for your reply! I get it now, I just tried to lean and lock my torso as hollow as possible, and I was able to lean myself off the ground! Thanks again!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Nischal

Scottmo,

To answer your questions, build up to 30s holds on the planche leans. This should be done on both floor and rings. It's very easy to lean farther and farther as you get stronger. Try not to do this. Pick an amount of lean you are capable of and follow SSC cycles to increase that lean. Again the key is to lean, not lift.

What are SSC cycles?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Keilani Gutierrez

What are SSC cycles?

training methodology used for Intermediate GST athletes. basically, after the Foundation series is mastered, from what I have understood, we will be using a different type of methodology for how to scheme  the sets, the reps and how long to do those schemes for to avoid injury and maximize strength/mobility gains

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Nischal

training methodology used for Intermediate GST athletes. basically, after the Foundation series is mastered, from what I have understood, we will be using a different type of methodology for how to scheme  the sets, the reps and how long to do those schemes for to avoid injury and maximize strength/mobility gains

Thanks a lot.  After reading your answer, I googled it and got to know that it means "Steady state cycles". Am reading more about them rite now .

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sebastian Schneider

what about the foot position?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Jon Douglas

what about the foot position?

For what? PL lean?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sebastian Schneider

yeah it seems to be different than in F1, how come?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest SuperBru

For anyone who is struggling with the planche lean have a thorough read of Dillion's post. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Jake Lawrance

wing02a.jpg If anyone was looking for a rather disturbing winged scapula, here it is! :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.

×

Important Information

Please review our Privacy Policy at Privacy Policy before using the forums.