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klops3style

Problem with planche

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Joshua Naterman

Yea man, I think so. If you keep your wrists strong you almost don't even need to work fingers forward all that much, at least that's what it seems like to me.

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Cu Fang

During the pl lean like in the picture..do u focus on chest contraction or u contract your lat too?

Thank u

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Joshua Naterman

lats are huge. Lats and serratus anterior and subscapularis. And everything else, but those three are key.

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Richard Duelley

I agree Slizz, lats are huge in planche, I have been building volume with my planche work and my lats are always so sore. . . I am also building front lever volume at the same time so its a double Lat smash! :mrgreen:

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CalisthenicGod

Very nice posts in this thread, very helpful read and it has certainly expanded my knowledge base. :)

I am wondering if fingers out (pointing away perpendicular to your body) would be a good position to train the Planche. As this wrist position is similar to a Planche on Parallel Bars/Rings. I am currently training fingers forward however, though I might change my hand position later on when Planche gets more difficult (I am on Frogstand). I am about 186cms tall and weigh around 78-80kg, so fingers forward hand position may be hard on my wrists, especially the angle of my long arms during the lean which will put tremendous stress on my delicate wrists.

Anyways keep up with the amazing posts gentlemen :P

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Joshua Naterman
I agree Slizz, lats are huge in planche, I have been building volume with my planche work and my lats are always so sore. . . I am also building front lever volume at the same time so its a double Lat smash! :mrgreen:

LOL!!! Nice. I am starting to finally get into weighted PPP and they are awesome. I just call them weighted push ups but I do use a lower leverage position, with my hands somewhere below my chest. I'll have to video it to show. That is my slow re-introduction to horizontal pressing lol! I do BW rings push ups some days, just a few, and I get on cinder blocks and do a pretty big ROM with a 40 lb vest on with the PPP. I checked my weight in the position yesterday on a scale, just to see how much weight it was, and the scale read 200 lbs. In the regular push up position with the same vest it read 175 lbs. There is a huge difference. It feels good too, I'm learning to use my serratus properly and I feel the strength transfer over to planche. When I start planche training next year I should have a great base. Elbow conditioning + separate work for the muscles involved should = easy progress. I can already hold advanced tuck again but I'm going to go through the 60s of tuck just like the SSC guidelines recommend. That will be interesting. It's going to be pretty raw-tastic to have a rings planche.

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anhkun
I agree Slizz, lats are huge in planche, I have been building volume with my planche work and my lats are always so sore. . . I am also building front lever volume at the same time so its a double Lat smash! :mrgreen:

LOL!!! Nice. I am starting to finally get into weighted PPP and they are awesome. I just call them weighted push ups but I do use a lower leverage position, with my hands somewhere below my chest. I'll have to video it to show. That is my slow re-introduction to horizontal pressing lol! I do BW rings push ups some days, just a few, and I get on cinder blocks and do a pretty big ROM with a 40 lb vest on with the PPP. I checked my weight in the position yesterday on a scale, just to see how much weight it was, and the scale read 200 lbs. In the regular push up position with the same vest it read 175 lbs. There is a huge difference. It feels good too, I'm learning to use my serratus properly and I feel the strength transfer over to planche. When I start planche training next year I should have a great base. Elbow conditioning + separate work for the muscles involved should = easy progress. I can already hold advanced tuck again but I'm going to go through the 60s of tuck just like the SSC guidelines recommend. That will be interesting. It's going to be pretty raw-tastic to have a rings planche.

i find this really odd because when in flat tuck position i mainly feel the contraction in shoulders and little bit of triceps, mayb im doing something wrong

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Rafael David

I think that I'll never get a full planche with palms back, not in this life, maybe the next, if I come back the Earth of course... :lol:

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anhkun

i just started to realised that practicing planche with hands forward is having a toll on my wrist even with flexibility training, so i decided to go with hands out to the side which is alot more comfortable but my adv tuck planche has dropped from 12 seconds to 3 seconds. did i make the right decision? or should i just keep going with hands forward?

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Joshua Naterman
i just started to realised that practicing planche with hands forward is having a toll on my wrist even with flexibility training, so i decided to go with hands out to the side which is alot more comfortable but my adv tuck planche has dropped from 12 seconds to 3 seconds. did i make the right decision? or should i just keep going with hands forward?

Work on adv tuck once a week, spend the rest of the time on tuck. You are using a harder hand position, it's going to take a bit longer but you will become stronger.

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Andreas Magneshaugen Ullerud

Hi!

I just started training planche training and i am trying too figure out the right muscle activation. I think that i got the hollow body position right, judging from my planche leans. There is a problem though that i hope you guys could give me some advice on. If i have understood things correctly you are supposed to feel the planche most in the lats, even in the leans, but i feel it only in my shoulders. When im standing just mimicing the position on dillon pictures i am able the depress the shoulders and activate lats, but when im inn either the leans or tuck planche i just feel the shoulders (and biceps) working. I am also having trouble keeping hollow body doing PPP. I have been training those for a while, but i took some time before i released i was doing them wrong. Adivce anyone?

I currently have 14 second tuck planche and 30 second advanced frog stand.

Regards, Andreas!

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Joshua Naterman

Chances are good you just aren't strong enough in scapular muscles. Serratus push ups are a good idea, do them slowly. Eventually do them weighted, and on the rings when you are able to. Hang rings wide if possible.

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Rafael David
i just started to realised that practicing planche with hands forward is having a toll on my wrist even with flexibility training, so i decided to go with hands out to the side which is alot more comfortable but my adv tuck planche has dropped from 12 seconds to 3 seconds. did i make the right decision? or should i just keep going with hands forward?

Work on adv tuck once a week, spend the rest of the time on tuck. You are using a harder hand position, it's going to take a bit longer but you will become stronger.

And about do low volume but keep the intensity? I mean, one day do 6 x10s and the rest of the week do 1x10s?

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Joshua Naterman
i just started to realised that practicing planche with hands forward is having a toll on my wrist even with flexibility training, so i decided to go with hands out to the side which is alot more comfortable but my adv tuck planche has dropped from 12 seconds to 3 seconds. did i make the right decision? or should i just keep going with hands forward?

Work on adv tuck once a week, spend the rest of the time on tuck. You are using a harder hand position, it's going to take a bit longer but you will become stronger.

And about do low volume but keep the intensity? I mean, one day do 6 x10s and the rest of the week do 1x10s?

No good, you are missing the point. You need to only expose to the higher load occasionally, once a week is plenty. More than that is asking for trouble, and you will get it via injury. Just be patient and when you hit a 10s perfect adv tuck hold you should be ok with 2x per week for 2-3 sets and 2x per week harder holds. I would not do more than that until you hit the 45-60s benchmark with tuck planche. You WILL be capable of more, but you need to not DO more. Very important.

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Rafael David

In the book is said that when someone hit 15s can move to the next variation and then maybe get 3-5s in that new variation, I already hit 20s adv tuck planche and 4s straddle, both on floor. So how I should proceed? :?

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Joshua Naterman
In the book is said that when someone hit 15s can move to the next variation and then maybe get 3-5s in that new variation, I already hit 20s adv tuck planche and 4s straddle, both on floor. So how I should proceed? :?

It is a good idea to test tuck. If you have at least 45s tuck you should be fine for adv tuck, which is where you belong right now. The book is not quite right, the article is more accurate in this sense. Simple mis-print. 15s applies to moving on from straddle.

build 45-60s adv tuck before doing serious straddle work. If you can't hold 45s tuck your support structures are not where they need to be for adv tuck. It is a step backwards, but will pay off down the line. I would still 2-3 adv tuck holds, probably for 13-15s. I can't say whether you should be doing straddle without seeing it, not all straddles are straddles worth doing.

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Bruno Cochofel

I was looking to youtube and found this video:

I was not doing the tuck planche this way, my knees tend to go in front of the arms, I'm now trying to do this way, still tuck not flat tuck, and the diff is huge.. it's really hard to maintain... From the book I haven't noticed this, guess that's one of the things you get from seminars.. I wish I could be to one of those, it must be a gold mine to learn and find several tips to improve...

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Mikko Myllymäki

Have to vent my frustration somewhere. :evil: I trained the planche along with the other FSPs for almost two years and got to the point where I could hold the tuck planche for about 20s. My progress stalled there for a long time and I decided to start anew with the FSP prerequisites last summer. I've been making steady progress with the pre FSPs and thought that maybe it's time to continue with the tuck planche (the pre FSPs get very boring). After reading this thread and especially Dillon's advice on how to hollow properly and lean in to the planche I tried the tuck planche again and couldn't even lift my legs up from the floor. So I guess the two years that I did train the planche before the pre FSPs was for nothing since I had been doing it wrong.

Any ideas how to continue from here?

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seiyafan

I understand your frustration, at one point I was blaming my lower back and core muscles not being strong enough to lift the hips high enough so my tucked feet can clear the ground. Later I realized that was wrong.

I think the reason most people can't lift their hips high enough is because they can't lean forward enough. And the reason they can't lean forward enough before losing balance is because their anterior deltoid is not strong enough.

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Erik Sjolin
Have to vent my frustration somewhere. :evil: I trained the planche along with the other FSPs for almost two years and got to the point where I could hold the tuck planche for about 20s. My progress stalled there for a long time and I decided to start anew with the FSP prerequisites last summer. I've been making steady progress with the pre FSPs and thought that maybe it's time to continue with the tuck planche (the pre FSPs get very boring). After reading this thread and especially Dillon's advice on how to hollow properly and lean in to the planche I tried the tuck planche again and couldn't even lift my legs up from the floor. So I guess the two years that I did train the planche before the pre FSPs was for nothing since I had been doing it wrong. Any ideas how to continue from here?

If it makes you feel any better, the same deal has happened to me, except I never had proper form in my tuck, so I'm back at the adv frogstand/PL leans and mastering the scap position.

To put it in perspective, it's not nearly as bad as my handstand push up. Been doing that since I was 16 years old (six years now), and I've had to restart from square one no less than five times due to stagnation or injury. :|

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Cole Dano

Millhill I sure understand your frustration. Coming from the perspective of a guy who's been training various things over the years, Ashtanga yoga to a world class level, only to start from ground zero with Coach Sommer, I can say though it may feel like it now, you didn't waste the two years. There may have been a faster way sure, but you were gaining understanding as well as strength nonetheless.

Coaching is very tough, self coaching is tougher, it's very very hard to see what you are doing objectively, to be able to experiment when things don't go right to figure what little technical error you are making.

Even if you had a Coach, they have to be able to 1) see the error and even harder 2) find a way to communicate it to you that you understand.

I can't tell you how many bad instructions I've gotten over the years, and when I was younger I took them at face value, rather than trying to interpret them into something that worked for me. In the last instance this caused me to tear my shoulders apart, because some 'big time' yoga teacher said I need to externally rotate in various inverted positions.

That caused me to loose three years, and my most of what was a very advanced yoga practice. That's when I realized I needed to find people who knew what they were talking about, and start to trust myself to figure out the right way for me rather than the book way. (Sadly many Coaches and teachers never get past this point)

Anyway my point is, to be cliche, this is a journey, no time is wasted, even if detours are taken. Learn from them and you will be way ahead in the long run.

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Mikko Myllymäki

Thanks guys for the pep talk. I really do appreciate it. :) Sometimes it can be hard to see things in a positive light.

I definitely am much stronger than say 3-4 years ago, so there has been progress. It's just that the progress in the FSPs (especially planche) seem to be almost non-existent. Makes me wonder what I'm doing wrong. I've put a lot of time and effort into them with little results. It's hard to find a coach from around here to help with this stuff and the seminars are way too expensive for my student budget.

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Mats Trane

Its all about finding your weak links but this can be hard sometimes.

The tuff thing about the planch is to get to the muscles that need to get stronger.

Like Dillon said its all about how much you can lean into it. One way I´ve been doing lately is to hang a rubberband from the ceiling

and get it around your waist so you can get into a tuck planch with more lean. I just started this so I cant tell if the results are any good yet but I´ll keep you posted.

We have to remeber though, the planch is a hard skill which takes alot of time and dedication to master.

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seiyafan
Like Dillon said its all about how much you can lean into it. One way I´ve been doing lately is to hang a rubberband from the ceiling and get it around your waist so you can get into a tuck planch with more lean.

That's a great idea! I am going to try the same thing to see which part of my body is the weakest link. (hopefully the answer is not all of it :mrgreen: )

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lesstime

form check?

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