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Kiyoshi

Planche assistance

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Joshua Naterman

Wall planche push ups are a very good idea when you're able to easily do 5x5 smooth reps of XR PMP. Wall maltese push ups come when 5x5 wall planche push ups are no problem. Body must remain straight and slightly hollow the whole time.That's Coach's recommendation in the book. A static wall hold isn't bad, but you are running a big risk of overusing the biceps tendon at this point. Just be careful not to do too much! It will definitely help, but too much too soon will set you back many months.

Keep in mind those come in just behind unsupported planche push ups in terms of difficulty. Done correctly these will be very, very, very hard. Don't let your upper arm squeeze in on your body.

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Tarun Suri
I already have answered everything pertaining to planche development through flat tuck. It's pretty simple: Don't move on until you have a PERFECT 60s hold in what you're training. Don't train any progression that you can't at least hold for 15-20s.

I can perform frogstand for 60s. But advance frogstand for only 6s. What's interesting is that I can do a straight arm tuck with knees outside elbows (not resting on them) and tuck planche for 6s also. There seems to be a disconnect. Do you have any suggestions?

In a bizarre train of events, I randomly tested my tuck planche max hold and it is now 23 seconds (I think I could have held it for 2 more). This is with very little training (it inevitably happens with school). However, I have eliminated all grains from my diet since. Indeed, planche is quite the weird beast for me.

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Joshua Naterman

The best gains often come with less training than you think.

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ashita
The best gains often come with less training than you think.

Im totally agree with that

Sometimes you train just a bit and you gain a lot of strenght quickly....

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Newguy

Hey quick planche question

Is it better to train for 60 seconds total time in short bursts (I.e 6X10) or should I just go all out for the 60 seconds (I.e 16 Seconds, 8 seconds, 5 seconds, 6 seconds, 3 seconds, 2 seconds...)

I am normally just going all out, and my problem with this is I can hold it for 15 seconds at the start, but as I go on to finish the 60 seconds, I am already somewhat drained because I went all out for the starting 15 seconds. And then I can't hold it for nearly as long :/ Does this make any sense???

And random second question :lol: What is a list of all the supplementary training that you can do for the planche. (I.e PL leans...)

Thanks

The newguy

P.S has anyone else noticed the INSANE amount of wrist strength that the Planche takes??? :shock: :D

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Joshua Naterman

You don't want to go all out at this stage in training. You want to have a series of submaximal sets that add up to 60s. I'm not saying that what you are doing won't work, but it is not the most efficient way. You don't want to drain yourself in planche training, especially in this early stage.

The most important part of planche training is keeping the shoulder balanced. If you don't you are running an unreasonable risk of injury. There is a lot written on that here.

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Cole Dano
You don't want to go all out at this stage in training. You want to have a series of submaximal sets that add up to 60s. I'm not saying that what you are doing won't work, but it is not the most efficient way. You don't want to drain yourself in planche training, especially in this early stage.

The most important part of planche training is keeping the shoulder balanced. If you don't you are running an unreasonable risk of injury. There is a lot written on that here.

I'm unsure of one thing. Is there a lower limit where this is no longer effective, or at least practical?

Say i can hold for only 2 seconds, is there any sense in doing 30 reps?

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Kiyoshi
You don't want to go all out at this stage in training. You want to have a series of submaximal sets that add up to 60s. I'm not saying that what you are doing won't work, but it is not the most efficient way. You don't want to drain yourself in planche training, especially in this early stage.

The most important part of planche training is keeping the shoulder balanced. If you don't you are running an unreasonable risk of injury. There is a lot written on that here.

I'm unsure of one thing. Is there a lower limit where this is no longer effective, or at least practical?

Say i can hold for only 2 seconds, is there any sense in doing 30 reps?

I would say yes, because youre still building the strength.

Eventually you will hold it for 5 secs and then continue that process until youre where you want to be.

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Joshua Naterman

Absolutely not. If you can only do something for 2 seconds, that means it is a true all-out effort. Your body and your nervous system can not handle 30 sets of all out effort. That's just silly when you think about it in these terms.

I don't know what Coach's stance on a lower limit for full lay is, but I know he's pretty clear about having a 15s straddle before directly training full lay, and about having a 60s advanced tuck before training straddle. It is very, very, very unlikely that anyone will be doing a nice 60s adv tuck PL and not be able to hold at least a 3-4s straddle planche right off the bat.

When you're doing max effort, you really shouldn't do more than two contractions without a ton of rest. You should see what the electrical stimulation looks like. Peak force drops off RAPIDLY with each repetition at maximal intensities like the proposed 2s hold. This is drains the CNS and if you try to keep training you will be partially or wholly undoing the potential gains in efficiency that will lead to greater strength. 1-2 sets of a single maximal effort like this are all that should be done, and not every day. It takes 48-72 hours for the nervous system to fully recover according to everything I have read, and that is not including extreme amounts of max efforts, that's just one or two. Twice a week nonconsecutive days doing 1-2 maximal full lay holds with the other days being just straddle work would be ideal according to this research, and the funny thing is that your body will force this anyhow. There's no reason to fight it, you will be far better off by using this knowledge to accelerate your gains instead. At least that's what I think. I don't know what has been done in practice as far as this kind of training.

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Patrick Angelo Sardilli

You have to stop looking at other people and start looking at yourself and whether you have holes in your plan. I've just given you the entire plan.

good thread and I like this slizzardman well said.

Focus on yourselves guys.

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