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Oscar Riaño

Hips in One Arm Handstand

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Oscar Riaño

Hi guys,

I've builded a solid handstand and i would like to know if it is necessary to apply the posterior pelvic tilt in the straddled one arm handstand.

Thanks in advance!

Yours in Fitness, (blink blink) hehe

Oscar 

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Tanya Hill

Hi Oscar, 

Yes, you want to have a posterior pelvic tilt in your straddle one arm handstand. You do not want to have an arch and use this for balance. ;)

Send over a video of your current progress. 

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Oscar Riaño
11 hours ago, Tanya Hill said:

Hi Oscar, 

Yes, you want to have a posterior pelvic tilt in your straddle one arm handstand. You do not want to have an arch and use this for balance. ;)

Send over a video of your current progress. 

So, actually, the legs need to be rotated outwards as if we would point the floor with the knees? There are many other one arm handstand variations and its (i would say) impossible to hold the ppt on them. Besides that i see many circus performers without using ppt. They all seem to have rounded butt :) 

Thanks in advance!! :D

Edited by Oscar Riaño

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Ian Richardson

Hey Oscar,

For Basic One Arm and Two arm handstand positions like Tuck, Straddle and Straight I've found it  its better to have my erector spinae engaged, which does tilt your pelvis under. This does change with side bending postions, which i haven't yet found a good way to describe in writing yet :P You can definitely do a one arm without the pelvic tilt, BUT if you want to begin moving through positions its easier to keep it engaged. In my opinion the pelvic tilt also looks better but each to their own. 


Check out this video of the germinator, see how is lower back stays completely still without arching while moving his legs around. Having flat middles also helps. 



Hope this helps :)

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Luke Searra

Oscar if you get the chance please post your video for us to take a look!

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Oscar Riaño

Guys, sorry for the late reply! 

Okay, today i will upload a video of my handstand and one arm handstand training! 

Cheers :D

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Oscar Riaño
On 10/19/2017 at 10:16 AM, Ian Richardson said:

Hey Oscar,

For Basic One Arm and Two arm handstand positions like Tuck, Straddle and Straight I've found it  its better to have my erector spinae engaged, which does tilt your pelvis under. This does change with side bending postions, which i haven't yet found a good way to describe in writing yet :P You can definitely do a one arm without the pelvic tilt, BUT if you want to begin moving through positions its easier to keep it engaged. In my opinion the pelvic tilt also looks better but each to their own. 


Check out this video of the germinator, see how is lower back stays completely still without arching while moving his legs around. Having flat middles also helps. 



Hope this helps :)

The video is so inspiring :D

Yeah, I've been working on one arm HS with the posterior pelvic tilt and, in my opinion, I also think they look way better :)

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Oscar Riaño

hi guys here is the video for one arm HS training...

I actually realized that my handstand is uneven... Perhaps due to my last shoulder injury (nothing really serious) but still willing to correct it! 

 

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Julian Aldag

You aren't dropping the legs at the same level. If you start with your hands a little closer, it will make transferring the weight onto on arm a lot easier. Also try to lock your hips out as you move your weight onto your 1 hand. And lastly, keep those shoulders elevated and 'hide your ears'. As you try to transfer the weight and 'push more through the shoulder' of the weight-bearing arm, it is throwing off your alignment. (Especially as you are going from fingertips to 1 finger)  Actively pushing both your shoulders the whole time will help to eliminate this. 

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Oscar Riaño
14 hours ago, Julian Aldag said:

You aren't dropping the legs at the same level. If you start with your hands a little closer, it will make transferring the weight onto on arm a lot easier. Also try to lock your hips out as you move your weight onto your 1 hand. And lastly, keep those shoulders elevated and 'hide your ears'. As you try to transfer the weight and 'push more through the shoulder' of the weight-bearing arm, it is throwing off your alignment. (Especially as you are going from fingertips to 1 finger)  Actively pushing both your shoulders the whole time will help to eliminate this. 

Thanks for the correction Julian, I just found it easier to hold the position when I put that leg in a "half-figa" position. By hiding the ears do you mean that it should naturally happen with the shoulder elevation or that the position of my head is not correct? 

Thanks again man :D I'll keep you updated with my videos 

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Julian Aldag

Yeah I can understand the half-figa. But I think thats going to mess you up down the line. Try to keep them seperate. At circus school (long time ago!) we used to do break up the drills first doing them in straddle (easiest), and then repeat with legs together.  I had a Chinese coach, but I know the Russian coaches prefer to do/learn all the basic drills in a flat back tuck handstand (without your ass sticking out). This is super hard, but nails the lower traps BIG time.  The lower traps help to keep the shoulders open and help prevent you from 'dropping your weight into your palm', which usually results in you falling over.    Its a slower way to begin learning handbalacing, but in the long term it builds a more solid base and that will make things mush easier later on. 

If your hand position is correct (You should approximately just be able to fit your head between the space of your two thumbs), then the elevated shoulders with naturally hide the ears. This is a stronger position as you can really push through the traps. And then you also dont have to shift the body as far to transfer the weight. Its a win/win.    If your hands are too wide apart, then you have to move further and it typically causes the arms to bend, which causes an 'energy leak' requiring more strength.  Handbalancing is about alignment. The more aligned you are, the more effortless it is. 

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Oscar Riaño

Thats really interesting! I will definetly re-align my handstand and restart my one arm training once my line is perfect. It is so interesting what you mentioned about the Russian coaches preferring to learn the basic drills on a flat back tuck handstand. Yeah, it is a lot harder to hold it, as the weight of your legs obligates you to make an effort in the opposite direction (which obligates you to open more your shoulders, indeed). Dude, you made things clear haha. And thanks for taking your time and open my eyes :D I'm a bit more wise today 

Salutes Julian! and thanks again

2 hours ago, Julian Aldag said:

Yeah I can understand the half-figa. But I think thats going to mess you up down the line. Try to keep them seperate. At circus school (long time ago!) we used to do break up the drills first doing them in straddle (easiest), and then repeat with legs together.  I had a Chinese coach, but I know the Russian coaches prefer to do/learn all the basic drills in a flat back tuck handstand (without your ass sticking out). This is super hard, but nails the lower traps BIG time.  The lower traps help to keep the shoulders open and help prevent you from 'dropping your weight into your palm', which usually results in you falling over.    Its a slower way to begin learning handbalacing, but in the long term it builds a more solid base and that will make things mush easier later on. 

If your hand position is correct (You should approximately just be able to fit your head between the space of your two thumbs), then the elevated shoulders with naturally hide the ears. This is a stronger position as you can really push through the traps. And then you also dont have to shift the body as far to transfer the weight. Its a win/win.    If your hands are too wide apart, then you have to move further and it typically causes the arms to bend, which causes an 'energy leak' requiring more strength.  Handbalancing is about alignment. The more aligned you are, the more effortless it is. 

 

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Julian Aldag

Yeah, the Circus Chinese trainers largely have a make or break attitude to training people. However in my experience, the Russians (and Europeans) have more of a methodical, scientific based training methods. 

No worries dude! Keep posting videos!!

 

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