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Hayden.M.

Static holds during Dynamic exercises?

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Hayden.M.

i read in the increasing pullups section of BTGB book that a good idea is to perform a static hold during the pullup at the top section and the bottom section of the pullup. can this be applied to every single dynamic exercise out there and have the same beneficial effects?

thanks for your time,

Hayden

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Nick Van Bockxmeer

not every single dynamic exercises but most. Part of the reason it works so well for pull ups is because often people elastic energy to abbreviate their ROM and thus actually skip the working load of half the movement. I would recommend having a small pause at fully bent and straight elbow positions for bent arm pulls and presses. Also a good idea for all exercises using active flexiblity, for example holding the top position of your arch up.

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palmcron

Especially with exercises where I'm too weak to go through the full ROM, I started doing holds at top and bottom of the partial ROM I can perform. I'm hoping this will increase strength at the edge and eventually increase the ROM.

Just started doing it a few weeks ago, but was ill for the last two weeks, so I didn't have enough time yet to see results.

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Joshua Naterman

Pull ups and dips are the most important, but everything is single plane movement can be paused at the top and bottom. This is great for front lever rows too.

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Coach Sommer
can this be applied to every single dynamic exercise out there and have the same beneficial effects?

First it is important to note that pull-ups are not a dynamic exercise, but are a fundamental bodyweight exercise (FBE). However to answer your implied question; yes, inserting static holds into FBEs can be quite beneficial.

For the record, a dynamic exercise will include either a swinging component, a plyometric type component or both. These type of exercises can range from relatively mild to extremely potent (14 times bodyweight for a fraction of a second). Obviously, as has been mentioned previously, you must first have developed a solid foundation of basic strength prior to engaging in extensive dynamic strength work if you do not want to risk unnecessary injury to joints and connective tissues.

Yours in Fitness,

Coach Sommer

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Joshua Naterman

Gotcha. I was thinking in terms of dynamic = motion, as opposed to static, meaning motionless. I forget that there are specific meanings here! :oops: :lol:

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Blairbob

Yes, too many people confuse this.

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