Jump to content
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...
Samuel Inauen

A beginners guide to gymnastics and strength training

Recommended Posts

Samuel Inauen

Hello guys,

 

I'm new to this forum as well as to gymnastics. I'm 19 years old and have done strength training for the last couple years.

I want to learn some basic skills in gymnastics like Handstand(-Pushups), L-Sits, Muscle-Ups, Splits..., but I simultaneously want to work on my strength with barbell exercises, maybe some olympic lifts.

Are there any programs you can recommend? I don't want to buy a program I didn't hear any opinoins in the first place.

 

Thank you,

Samuel

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Alessandro Mainente

Hi Samuel, olympic lifts are a technical complex field and you need a face to face tutelage. Accordingly to GST, the handstand pushup requires handstand first , muscle up needs upper body basic strength and L-sit also flexibility.

all of these are completely covered by GB courses. I do not think I can say more.

  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Everett Carroll

Hi Samuel,

I agree with Alex in that the Foundation, Stretch, and Handstand courses are going to cover all of the necessary components of your physical preparation which can transfer nicely to things like olympic lifting. They will, of coure, also ensure complete preparedness for for advanced gymnastics and develop the skills you desire along the way. As an introduction to those courses, strongly consider Fundamentals. 

Please let us know if you have any other questions. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Samuel Inauen

Thanks for your replies guys!

But isn't Fundamentals just a stretching program?
Shouldn't I also follow a strengthening program all along?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Luke Searra

Samuel,

Sound advice from Alex and Everett. Fundamentals is not just a static stretching program its a mobility and mobility deficit diagnostic tool all in one. Fundamentals is a great introduction to all of the other other courses but, if you are a seasoned olympic lifter I suggest that you begin with a combination of stretch series, handstand one and foundations. This will also depend - as an olympic lifter where your mobility and strength deficits lie, since olympic lifting creates very specific mobility - GST will make your strength and mobility more well rounded and complete while reducing any aches and pains you might feel from lifting. Olympian gold medalists make huge use of both handstand based gymnastics strength as well as other gymnastics strength movements to complete their training and so should you.

  • Upvote 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Samuel Inauen

Another question, what equipement do I need to do these workouts?
We don't have gymnastic-gyms or so where I live.

 

Thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Pauline Taube

Hi Samuel :)

For the Fundamentals course you don't need any equipment except for floor space.

To start Foundation One you'll need floor space, rings, light dumbbell and a yoga mat.

For the stretch courses you'll need yoga block, yoga strap (optional), resistance band and a way to elevate the feet (bridge only, i.e. Box or stall bars)

For the Hanstand course  you'll need a walk, dowel with weight or weighted bar (5-10lbs).

 

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Charles Carpenter

I think it'd be useful to have the equipment requirements in the FAQ, as well as in the workouts (e.g, a note that you'll need dumbbell for that day's workout). I just started F1 today and didn't realize until I got started.  

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sean Murphey

Olympic lifts are no more technical than a handstand. Probably less so actually.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Jon Douglas
9 hours ago, Sean Murphey said:

Olympic lifts are no more technical than a handstand. Probably less so actually.

Interesting comparison. Taught from childhood, a strong HS should be an afterthought. Going back and having manually correct every facet as an adult, in isolation then in co ordination... well, that's another story.

Not familiar with how elite Oly lifters are trained, but I wouldn't imagine it's that dissimilar in concept?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Samuel Inauen

Oly lifters either are training their actual lifts snatch/clean&jerk or break down their lifts into simpler moves where you can go heavier normally -> e.g. snatch = snatch-grip deadlift, snatch clean, overhead squat
-> clean&jerk = snatch-grip deadlift, power clean, front squat, jerk
To strengthen the jerk they also do push presses, to strengthen the front squat they also do back squats, to strengthen the snatch-grip deadlift they also do regular deadlifts.
And then maybe some Isolation for weakpoint like lunges, ghr...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Alessandro Mainente

Actually in my OL class i'm used to spend at least 40-50 hours with a wood bar on the basic movements concept, then they are allowed to spend an impressive amount of time on the complete movement always with wood bar, meanwhile they begin to work on weighted fundamentals movements.

from a kid point of view the ability to do a full squat and hold a bar over head it is a bit easier. we are made to squat and support. on the contrary we are not made to stay inverted. from a kid pov a good handstand refinement can take years, since they vestibular apparatus it is not yet developed like in an adult and they tend to show less body control.

  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Luke Searra

Even though both movements are balances (Olympic lifting referring to the 2 lifts, snatch and clean and jerk), I would have to agree that although there many overlaying principles the clean and jerk in particular (as it has a closer relationship to handstand because of hand width), I would completely agree the olympic lifts are less complicated than a handstand.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Suzanna McGee

I did some OL training long time ago, and I must say that Handstand training is much harder for me, from one and only reason: I have never done any work upside down. I feared being upside down. So just being upside down and connecting with my core and what my body is doing is so strange to me that it takes a lot of "getting used to". All this I didn't need to do in OL :)

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Please sign in to comment

You will be able to leave a comment after signing in



Sign In Now

×

Important Information

Please review our Privacy Policy at Privacy Policy before using the forums.