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Paul Clay

H2 prereqs clarification

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Paul Clay

Hi there,

 

There are mixed messages on the website and on this forum about H2 prereqs.  This post:

https://www.gymnasticbodies.com/forum/topic/12862-the-gymnasticbodies-roadmap-and-curriculum/

states that you must finish F2 to start H2.  

 

However, on the intro materials and on the gb product website, it states that H1 and H2 are coorequisites, which to me means that you can start both as a beginner since H1 has no prereqs.

 

Can't find it now, but there was even a post with the same question... and it left me confused.

 

Which one is it?

 

Thank you!

Paul

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Sarah Gleeson

Look for the "Handstand 3 has been released" in the search. Coach Sommer had a great clarification in there, and an explanation of why H2 is a core requisite with H1.

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Paul Clay

Thank you!  That's what I was looking for.  For other's looking, yes, one can start H2 PE elements when you start H1.   I'll repost here:

 

 

It appears that GB Curriculum roadmap is going to require an adjustment; especially in terms of mobility and handstandwork.  This fine tuning will be an ongoing process.

 

It was never my intent that students would not start press handstand work until 2-3 years after they began GST.  Once again, your guys' zombie like mobility is throwing a monkey wrench into the GB developmental path.  

 

To start with, everyone needs to stretch more.  A lot more.  I had hoped that the GB Stretch courses would accelerate the correction of these basic mobility deficits, and they have in some cases; but not everyone has been taking full advantage of them.

 

For example in my own personal training, I currently strength train 3 days per week, yet I stretch 5-6 days per week; 3 days of full body limbering before the strength workouts and 2-3 days of 'hard stretching' on off days with the stretch courses.  

 

If limbering up before a workout, during a workout with the integrated mobility and the stretch courses themselves are not the fundamental focus at your current level how are these deficits ever going to be corrected so that we can move on?

 

It also cannot be overstated that press handstands are essential for long term gains in GST.  Without a press handstandeverything in GST will later come to a grinding halt.  There is no avoiding this.  

 

I would also hope that it is obvious that effective press handstand work cannot take place without a reasonably proficient free handstand.  

 

In my opinion both free handstand and press handstand gains have been far, far too slow for most GB students.  It is a failure on my part that I have failed to be sufficiently explicit that handstand and press handstand are not party tricks to be worked on the side.  But let me be clear now that handstand and press handstand work are essential for future GST progress and must receive the same degree of attention and focus as your Foundation work.

 

Do not however be overly harsh on yourselves.  You are certainly not alone.

 

This summer while working with the GB Master Class and the GB World Team in Stroud, both groups composed of some of GB's best and most talented from around the planet, I had to be rather 'forthright' about their needing to remove their heads from their #$$@$, quit piddling around, and get these basic handstands and press handstands mastered.  In fact the majority of their 2 days of training was spent on exactly that.

 

Yours in Fitness,

Coach Sommer

 
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Murray Truelove

You probably still need a good pike and straddle.

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BARRIE MONTGOMERY

what does full body limbering entail?

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Paul Clay

 

 

what does full body limbering entail?

This could mean many different things, but pretty much, light-moderate stretching.  A 20 minute yoga vinyasa flow would probably be a good example.

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