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Timothy Aiken

Strength for Double Front

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Timothy Aiken

At every tricking gathering I've been to, there's always someone chasing double front. As someone who spends a lot of time in a gym, I've noticed there's a huge difference between the ability of the recreational athlete and the competitive gymnast. Obviously.

 

What is the difference in strength/technique between gymnasts who can double front, and non gymnasts seriously pursuing the skill? Is it simply a difference of numbers and understanding of the skill? 

 

Once the differences are identified, what are some drills or exercises to bridge the gap and allow this skill to be approachable for the non gymnast?

 

 

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Daniel Burnham

Hopefully josh slocum will chime in. He was learning double front and started as an adult.

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Toni Laukkavaara

probably connective tissue, tendon and joint strength

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Dylan Robertson

(Bump) Anyone also have any ideas on the dynamics (physics) of twisting? Seems harder than doing flips.

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GoldenEagle

Coming from competitive springboard diving experience.

 

To get more spins or flips a stronger core is required so that an individual can create more torque at your waist or momentum with your legs and or arms while he or she is in the air.

 

 

probably connective tissue, tendon and joint strength

That is needed for the shock absorption while landing.

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Timothy Aiken

So do most trickers or non competetive tumblers simply lack the core strength for double front?

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Alessandro Mainente

In order to do double front you need to.......jump higher as much as possible. When certain level of height amplitude is reached then we can talk about technique.

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Joshua Slocum

As a disclaimer, I'm not an expert on tricking, so remember that this post is written just off my impression from watching tricking videos.

 

Most tricking seems to be based on starting with little to no momentum and building/keeping momentum from skill to skill. While this can lead to some very cool combinations, it doesn't lend itself to developing the kind of momentum required to do "the big skills". You don't see many trickers doing double fronts for the same reason you don't see many trickers doing double layouts or triple backs - those skills require a big running start, and that sort of tumbling doesn't seem to fit the style of the sport. 

 

 

Edit: for comparison, take a look at power-tumbling, where the tumble strip used is much longer and a bit springier than the floor used in gymnastics. This allows power-tumblers to develop more momentum and redirect it more efficiently: the result is that in power tumbling you sometimes see skills that are even "bigger" than what you see even elite-level gymnasts performing, e.g. a full-twisting triple backflip, or a triple twisting double layout. 

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Katharina Huemer

Do you mean just a running double front or after a front handspring?

Bc after a front handspring it is pretty "easy" if the handspring is good, I can land it into the pit on a resi mat, but NO WAY from just a run!

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