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stella

a typical training plan for a gymnast would be....

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stella

Hello guys,

I am studying sport science and actually my emphasis in on prevention and rehab, but for this semester we got a project that has to do with training.
Each student should chose 1 sport and do a portfolio of the training methods, drills etc Then we have to present it. It should help us to see how the training between the different sports varies etc.

As I have been a gymnast myself for 8 years (I would say I was Level 6 USAG, although I did Excel) and still have many friends involved in the sport, I chose gymnastics!

I am done with everything, but stuck at the last point: the training shedule.
My prof said we should make a typical  plan, specifically for the sport we chose. It shouldn't be too easy like for rec, but not too hard and complex like for Elites. We can chose which Level our "model athlete" is.
 

I read pretty much every post here regarding strength training and have also been reading a lot on other forums like chalkbucket etc. 

The exercises I chose are the basic exercises for gymnasts I could read everywhere in this forum and I still remember them when we did them in the gym. I think they are very productive, because they mimic some of the original movements needed for gymnastics.

After putting together my trainings plan, I decided to ask here if "real pros" could help me to correct my plan and tell me wether it is good or not.

As I read a lot about max strength, endurance etc I decided to go for both in my plan because I think that both is important!

I chose a "normal" gymnast, who is competetive but not aiming for Nationals or so and just do it for fun but still on a good Level(maybe Level 6/7), trains about 4-5 times a week for a total of about 12 hours, and is able to do the strength workout below.

Each training session, she warms up for about 40 minutes, doing plyo jumps, some light conditioning and stretching. After that she spends about 20 minutes on each event. In the end she conditions a lot on 3 training days, for a total of about 1 hour. Twice a week she is doing the "max strength" ,once a week she is doing the endurance stuff.

 

PLAN:

pushing:

max:            5x5 Handstand push-ups

endurance: 50 push-ups (elbow close to the elbow)
                   20 diamond push-ups
                   20 wide push-ups
 

pulling:
max:            5x3 L-pull-ups

endurance: 10 pull-ups

 

 

active compression:
max:            5x5 L to V leg lifts

 

endurance: 20 full leg lifts

 

passive compression:

max:            5x5 secs V-sit

 

endurance: 60 secs L-Sit
 

open abs:  

max:            5x5 V-Hang to inverted Hang

         

endurance: 100 hollow body rocks

 

obliques:

max:            5x3 "around the world's"

 

endurance: 100 windshield wipers lying in floor

 

back/glutes/hamstrings:

max:            5x5 arch-ups with 10 lbs on arms and legs

 

endurance: 100 arch rocks

 

quadriceps:

max:            5x5 single leg squats

 

endurance: 100 free squats

 

calves+shins:

max:            -

 

endurance: 100 heel and toe raises

 

handstand:

max:            20 secs free

 

endurance: 3 minute against wall with proper form

In between the training plan she should throw press handstands, a total of about 10 each time.

What do you think about it? Is this a possible plan for a gymnast? Did I forget any muscle group? Will 3 times a week be enough? What about the 2 times a week max strength and once a week endurance? Stupid or good? Any change ideas?

Thank you!

 

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Blairbob

Would the "endurance" just be one set? I would guess that for a gymnast, it would be more than one, unless they are just trying to keep it light.

10 press HS at a minimum, maybe more like 15-20 attempts depending on how many they could make.

There is no legless rope climbs.

 

There is no floor glute ham raises. Arch-ups/rocks are decent but not the same.

 

There is no chin levers or pullovers or planche work such as planche leans, tuck planches, pseudo planche pushups. Or push-pulls on a floor bar or DB.

 

No body rows either. Honestly, for a L6/7 gymnast, this would be more for shoulder mobility and endurance than strength. Pretty sad if a L6/7 was still doing body rows as their main pulling strength element (unless it was front lever rows).

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stella

Would the "endurance" just be one set? I would guess that for a gymnast, it would be more than one, unless they are just trying to keep it light.

10 press HS at a minimum, maybe more like 15-20 attempts depending on how many they could make.

There is no legless rope climbs.

 

There is no floor glute ham raises. Arch-ups/rocks are decent but not the same.

 

There is no chin levers or pullovers or planche work such as planche leans, tuck planches, pseudo planche pushups. Or push-pulls on a floor bar or DB.

 

No body rows either. Honestly, for a L6/7 gymnast, this would be more for shoulder mobility and endurance than strength. Pretty sad if a L6/7 was still doing body rows as their main pulling strength element (unless it was front lever rows).

Thanks for your comment. Yes I was thinking of just one set for endurance!

I am talking about a girls....so are planches really important?

Don't chin levers work the same muscles as inverted hangs?

And one more thing....is it basically good to do 2 sets of max strength and 1 set of endurance per week? Or is it useless and you should better focus on max strength all the time or a combination of both?

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Blairbob

 True the V-hang to candle is similar but chin levers are more about training straight body like a front lever. I would actually say HLL to candle would be a progression to chin levers depending on how much swing you use and if the body is straight or tucked/piked.

One light day and 2 heavy days isn't a horrible idea. It kind of depends if someone can train 3 heavy days or needs that mental or physical respite.

 

 The planche work is important for cast HS. Basically planche leans, pseudo planche pushups and tuck planches. Well straight body cast HS. Straddle cast HS doesn't really need that kind of strength since it's basically a cast to straddle on and straddle press.

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