Jump to content
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...
Connor Davies

'Essential' GST moves.

Recommended Posts

Cody Ward

I had a 2.5 bodyweight deadlift and a 2x squat. I had no side lever unfortunately :(

but how was your military press and rows?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Alan Tseng

I don't believe this. Though it would be beneficial to work on the mobility aspect simultaneously.

Anyways I get what you're saying about the deadlifts. I feel the same way with military press for some reason. I'm going to start incorporating weights into my training soon and I'm sure it'll help.

There's other lifts that I don't care much for like bench press. I'd much rather follow the planche/PPU progressions.

There aren't many people who do both GST and lifting. Who knows what kind of strength it could create.

If you can't do an exercise unweighted why would you perform the same exercise with weights?

Many of the strength exercises itself in foundation contains a mobility component in itself. In GST we move on by going to a harder variation of an exercise, in weight training we move on by adding weights. You wouldn't move on if you can't demonstrate the previous strength exercise with full mobility

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Daniel Burnham

but how was your military press and rows?

My military press was stuck at 115 for a long time. Once I incorporated handstands and handstand push-ups it went to 150. I weighed 150 at the time. I suspect it was higher before injury but stopped training weights after I found similar advancements from bodyweight movements.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Cody Ward

If you can't do an exercise unweighted why would you perform the same exercise with weights?

Many of the strength exercises itself in foundation contains a mobility component in itself. In GST we move on by going to a harder variation of an exercise, in weight training we move on by adding weights. You wouldn't move on if you can't demonstrate the previous strength exercise with full mobility

He's talking about deadlifts, not squats. There isn't really a mobility requirement for deadlifts, almost everyone can do them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Jan Reipert

i got a 2s flag the first time i tried but i would say it was mostly shoulder strength from military press/push presses/jerks. i dont think there is a significant correlation between deadlifts and flags.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
James Price

Do you know what the best training program is?

-- Waits while everyone shouts "GST!" --

It's the one you enjoy doing.

Yeah, that sounds like a total cop-out. But you know why that statement is true? Because, without exception, the people who improve the best at what they're doing are those who turn up and do the damn work. And if you don't enjoy what you're doing, you won't drag yourself out of bed at 5am to get to the gym; you won't push that little bit extra to break through plateaus; you won't make your training partners bring out the best in you because you're not sharing your enthusiasm with them.

A brief moment of honesty: you are not going to be a world class gymnast. Sorry, but unless you're invested in something completely and utterly (and usually have committed to that from a young age, although there's plenty of exceptions to that rule) it ain't going to happen. This is related to a pretty simple idea - breadth is the total opposite of depth. The broader your training goals are, the less progressed you're going to be in any particular one of them. An analogy is doing a PhD, which is far better explaind with pictures: http://matt.might.net/articles/phd-school-in-pictures/.

So, why those 2 paragraphs? Well, firstly is to say that there are plenty of us who enjoy doing a wide variety of things - the multisport athletes are a prime example - triathletes or crossfitters. So long as you accept that if you're a triathlete, you're never going to be the best swimmer, or runner, or cyclist, then that's ok. But if you enjoy doing all 3 sports, why limit yourself to just one? If you were going to do just one of those sports, and you'd still not be at the pointy end of the field, what have you gained by limiting yourself? So do all 3 because you enjoy them!

Even in this thread you've seen several people say "Don't lift weights, you'll be bored in a few weeks". That's just like their opinion, man. For me, frankly, you can peel the barbell from my cold dead hands, and I suspect I've been lifting longer than a lot of you have been alive. But I also enjoy the gymnastics. Honestly, at my size, I'm never going to be the world's greatest gymnast - but you can be sure that I'm going to push the training as far as I personally am physically able to. To use another cliche: enjoying the journey, not the destination.

So if you feel you want to deadlift, then do so. If you want to pull mannas twice a day, then do that instead. Find the things that make you wake up in the morning and say "Hell yeah, I'm going training today!". And play with your parameters. Training capacity is heavily individualized (and is also trainable itself!), so play around and find out what kind of frequency and demands you can handle while still stimulation progression. Again, I'm getting pretty old, yet I still lift 6 days a week, on top of mobility and aerobic work - because over the years my training capacity has increased to a level where I can do this. But I wouldn't know unless I'd played around and found out.

And as for structuring your workouts, the most important thing to me is to learn from as many people as possible; and not only look at what they're saying, but why they're saying it. Compare progressions in GB to work from people like Verkhoshanky or Siff, or even those internet-gurus who are often bad mouthed. Why are they saying what they're saying? What are the common themes? Is this information useful, or do I discard it? Read, understand, and use as applicable. And understand that what's useful for you may be different to what's useful to someone else.

And as an aside - I train with a very good weightlifter (good as in Canadian medallist), a 105kg guy. Who I just recently saw pull a human flag for several seconds with little apparent effort, and absolutely no gymnastics background. I've seen a heavyweight judoka, in the 110kg range, do standing backflips. Strength is transferable. Mobility I personally feel less so, and I think that's one of the areas GB's courses excel (as well as providing very structured progressions).

Do the things you love to do, and everything else will fall into place.

(And on re-reading I've realised this whole essay is applicable to way more in life than just training).

 

  • Upvote 9

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Joshua Slocum

Yes, you should do what you're passionate about... but there is no training methodology that is without plateaus or soreness and other difficulties. You need the commitment and tenacity to stick with your program through the parts that aren't as nice. If every 6 months you find a new 'passion' then you were never that passionate about the those things anyways.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Alan Tseng

He's talking about deadlifts, not squats. There isn't really a mobility requirement for deadlifts, almost everyone can do them.

I know what he was talking about.

 

Of course there are mobility requirements for deadlifts.  Enough mobility in your posterior chain to touch your toes, proper APT, etc.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Redwan Haque

It's just....  Have you ever deadlifted?  There's just something so primal about it.  It feels freaking awesome!  

 

 

Relevant: 

 

On a more serious note - I agree with what people are saying to an extent. It's true you need to put in consistent effort to succeed. But it has to be effort into something that's actually working for you. As a beginner you should be making notable strength gains from week to week. People are talking about plateauing - but that comes after you've exhausted your beginner gains. If you haven't MADE beginner gains in the first place, and have been plateauing at the very first elements of Foundation for the best part of a year - maybe it's best to try something different. If anything, just to keep yourself motivated to train.

 

Deadlifts particularly should build some good upper back/erector/posterior chain strength. It'll help you with your early RC PEs and SL PEs. Do some face pulls while you're at it, or just consider pulling with retracted/depressed shoulders start to finish instead of conventional style, to build up that rear delt strength you'll need for RC and FL elements.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Connor Davies

Relevant:

OH come on, he started above his knees!

 

I find 'newbie gains' to be a really strange concept.  On the one hand, it's a matter of building strength from scratch, but on the other hand it's about building efficiency with particular lifts.  You could take a world champion gymnast and throw him in a room with a barbell and he'd make 'newbie gains' at the big lifts, despite already being a very strong person.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Redwan Haque

OH come on, he started above his knees!

 

Fun Sad fact of the day - "On 16 January 1993 Jón Páll Sigmarsson died of a heart attack. He was deadlifting in his gym in Iceland when he suffered the heart attack, caused, it is thought, by a traumatic aortic rupture which was related to a weakened heart, a problem that was known to exist in his family."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Connor Davies

Fun Sad fact of the day - "On 16 January 1993 Jón Páll Sigmarsson died of a heart attack. He was deadlifting in his gym in Iceland when he suffered the heart attack, caused, it is thought, by a traumatic aortic rupture which was related to a weakened heart, a problem that was known to exist in his family."

Apparently he couldn't do deadlift anymore.  At least the guy stuck to his principles....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Samuli Jyrkinen

Fun Sad fact of the day - "On 16 January 1993 Jón Páll Sigmarsson died of a heart attack. He was deadlifting in his gym in Iceland when he suffered the heart attack, caused, it is thought, by a traumatic aortic rupture which was related to a weakened heart, a problem that was known to exist in his family."

Although it is unfortunate he suffered the heart attack, he died doing what he loved and I don't think there is any better way to die :)

  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Connor Davies

Although it is unfortunate he suffered the heart attack, he died doing what he loved and I don't think there is any better way to die :)

I hope he set a PR. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest

"Newbie gains" are from neurological adaptations.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Keilani Gutierrez

exercise.pngI'll be over here.

  • Upvote 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Please sign in to comment

You will be able to leave a comment after signing in



Sign In Now

×

Important Information

Please review our Privacy Policy at Privacy Policy before using the forums.