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Chrono

PPT VS HOLLOW

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Chrono

Hello !

quick question guys ,  when someone says i need to be hollow in HS , FL , PL , does this mean that i should PPT?

 

Hollow and PPT are same things?

 

 

PPT= POSTERIOR PELVIC TILT

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Eric HARDOUIN

I would say yes for the hips, but hollow also means a specific thoracic posture (think serratus activation with strong upper-back control, ribs pulled in etc).

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Chrono

Coach can you clear this up to me ?

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Joshua Slocum

PPT or posterior pelvic tilt refers to a specific movement of your pelvis. "Hollow body" refers to the positioning of the entire body: a slightly rounded upper back, a straight or slightly rounded lower back, PPT, and straight hips and knees. 

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Chrono

PPT or posterior pelvic tilt refers to a specific movement of your pelvis. "Hollow body" refers to the positioning of the entire body: a slightly rounded upper back, a straight or slightly rounded lower back, PPT, and straight hips and knees. 

 

 

The straight lower back /rounded lower back is from the PPT ? 

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Joshua Slocum

The straight lower back /rounded lower back is from the PPT ? 

Yes and no. PPT refers to the position of the pelvis, not the spine. However, it's very difficult to have PPT and not have a straight or slightly rounded lower back. 

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Chrono

Yes and no. PPT refers to the position of the pelvis, not the spine. However, it's very difficult to have PPT and not have a straight or slightly rounded lower back. 

 

LOL I tried it now! and yes having PPT and not have a straight or slightly rounded lower back is realy hard , if I did it right , it feels pretty unnatural , and to me PPT and straight lower back comes naturally so I wont overthink it ..

 

 

Another question is , the rounding of the upper back comes from protraction of the scapula? 

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Joshua Slocum

Protraction is distinct from the rounding of the upper back.

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Chrono

Mmmm im pretty confused because I thought when someone retracting his scaps his upper body becomes kind of arched and when protracting the upper body is rounded.. all my life was a LIE

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Eric HARDOUIN

You're not wrong, but the rounded upper-back is not the main thing you'll look after when mastering protraction...

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Chrono

OK THANKS...

1.so when doing FL and PL I should Hollow or only PPT?

2.same question to handstand

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Eric HARDOUIN

Check for posts by "handbalancer" for the handstand, where protraction + flexion of the arms is tricky...

 

For PL hollow +++ , this is why planche leans are so important first, check this https://www.gymnasticbodies.com/forum/topic/5959-scapula-position-for-basic-and-static-exercises/

 

 

For FL you have to retract strongly while keeping PPT, so you'll end kind of neutral, but of course you don't protract...

 

Hope this helps

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Joshua Slocum

Mmmm im pretty confused because I thought when someone retracting his scaps his upper body becomes kind of arched and when protracting the upper body is rounded.. all my life was a LIE

Scapular position is largely independent of spinal movement. In a planche for example, one has a rounded back and protracted scapula. But in a manna, one has a rounded back and retracted scapula.

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Chrono

Scapular position is largely independent of spinal movement. In a planche for example, one has a rounded back and protracted scapula. But in a manna, one has a rounded back and retracted scapula.

Now it makes sense!! thank you , so today I learned that scapula movements doesnt rely on spine movements

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Mikael Kristiansen

Posterior pelvic tilt in handstand comes from tightening your butt and legs. Like joshua said, you want to stay hollow and the PPT is a requirement of that.

 

Your scapula want to be protracted and elevated. Protraction by itself rounds the upper back by having your scapulae move out sideways and forwards. When you protract during elevation you will close your shoulder angle, which requires you to be capable of 180 degrees active flexion while protracted. When done efficiently a handstand will appear very straight but you are hollowed and can stay closer to the heel of your palm without compensating by either sticking out the chest, piking or arching.

 

A common thing which adds to confusion for many is that they are capable of keeping a "straight" line from palm to hip, but then the legs automatically pass the bodyline even though there is no arch in the lower back. This comes from doing the handstand by only elevating the scapula and bringing the arms to 180 without protracting(which pulls the sternum in by default). 

 

Look at this clip and notice how my feet are slightly in front of my hands at the very beginning. Even so, there is very little compensation further down in my bodyline because my shoulders are protracted and takes many variables out of the equation. Im hollow and I spend next to zero energy with my fingers. Next, look at 0.24-0.25 where I do a SLIGHT adjustment after closing my legs. I hollow out a bit more to align better. It is this kind of sensitivity which is necessary to master to build towards more advanced balances. If I want to, I can "flatten" my handstand even more than in this clip, but the position I keep here is sort of my default where I am very stable, consistent and strong, and what is conditioned to happen instantly every single time I go up.

 

 

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GoldenEagle

Like joshua said, you want to stay hollow and the PPT is a requirement of that.

 

 

Emphasis added

 

To answer the initial questions:

 

1. Yes, When someone tells you to "Hollow" you do a PPT

2. No, Hollow body position "Hollow" isn't the same as PPT. PPT is part of holding "Hollow."

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Domenic Palazzolo

Posterior pelvic tilt in handstand comes from tightening your butt and legs. Like joshua said, you want to stay hollow and the PPT is a requirement of that.

 

Your scapula want to be protracted and elevated. Protraction by itself rounds the upper back by having your scapulae move out sideways and forwards. When you protract during elevation you will close your shoulder angle, which requires you to be capable of 180 degrees active flexion while protracted. When done efficiently a handstand will appear very straight but you are hollowed and can stay closer to the heel of your palm without compensating by either sticking out the chest, piking or arching.

 

A common thing which adds to confusion for many is that they are capable of keeping a "straight" line from palm to hip, but then the legs automatically pass the bodyline even though there is no arch in the lower back. This comes from doing the handstand by only elevating the scapula and bringing the arms to 180 without protracting(which pulls the sternum in by default). 

 

Look at this clip and notice how my feet are slightly in front of my hands at the very beginning. Even so, there is very little compensation further down in my bodyline because my shoulders are protracted and takes many variables out of the equation. Im hollow and I spend next to zero energy with my fingers. Next, look at 0.24-0.25 where I do a SLIGHT adjustment after closing my legs. I hollow out a bit more to align better. It is this kind of sensitivity which is necessary to master to build towards more advanced balances. If I want to, I can "flatten" my handstand even more than in this clip, but the position I keep here is sort of my default where I am very stable, consistent and strong, and what is conditioned to happen instantly every single time I go up.

 

 

 

The last hour or so, I have been searching old posts just to try to pick up some pointers.

Handbalancer, you just taught me how to protract my scapula correctly, believe it or not..!!!!!

Just had that "aha" moment when I elevated my scapula, went into hollow, and it was so easy to hold.

This Line here below did it!!!

Thanks

 

"A common thing which adds to confusion for many is that they are capable of keeping a "straight" line from palm to hip, but then the legs automatically pass the bodyline even though there is no arch in the lower back. This comes from doing the handstand by only elevating the scapula and bringing the arms to 180 without protracting(which pulls the sternum in by default)."

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