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Shady_Jester

Exercises for explosiveness

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Shady_Jester

Guys,

 

I am on track with my training and everything is going great. But, I wanted to ask you if anyone had any exercises for explosiveness (lower body)?

 

I read the topic where coach says that I could be doing vertical jumps... I don't have a box or something to jump on (except my stairs - but if I fall down that I will fall down hard), so what do you recommend me to do so I can develop explosive power in my legs? Also, should I wait till I master all of the SLS elements, or could I develop explosive power along F1 (and H1)?

 

I may also look into "Stretching and Flexibility" by Kit, since it may make me more flexible (I stretch pre-workout anyway).

 

Thanks!

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José Ignacio Varela Suárez
I think that you are talking about two types of strength: explosive strength and reactive strenght.

 

For developing both correctly you will need good levels of previous strength so Foundation is a very good tool so as to be prepared for explosive drills.

 

Explosive strength:

 

- Explosive strength: If you use weights you want a load  between 30-60% 1 RM, because this intensity allows you to develop more power (better relation between strength and velocity). 4-6 sets of 6-(10) reps and only the reps you can perform with the maximum velocity. Rest 2-5', it's said, the time you need so as to perform other set with high quality.

 

- Elastic Explosive strength: You don't need weights here. Bodyweight is more than sufficient. Elastic Explosive strength are counter movement jumps. You accumulate elastic energy while you do the counter movement and the you use it in the concentric phase. 4-6 sets of 5-8 reps. Rest 2-6', the time you need so as to perform other set with high quality.

 

- Reflex Elastic Explosive Strength: You could use weighted vest but not at the begining. Reflex elastic explosive strength are jumps in which you use the stretch reflex and the elastic energy accumulated because of a previous jump. For example: Drop Jumps or consecutive jumps. 2-5 sets of 5-8 reps. You have to perform them doing the fastest that you can once you touch the floor from the previous jump. If you squat to low so as to absorb the impact, you will loose the stretch reflex and a part of the elastic energy.

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Bryan Wheelock

Learning the Olympic lifts will increase explosiveness.

 

I also like kettlebells because they are simple technique wise and you have to absorb all the energy at the bottom of the lift vs having that energy put into the floor.

 

Making a plyobox is pretty easy and should cost less than $100.

If you open your eyes, there are probably low walls somewhere nearby you could jump on.

Jumping onto something is not required. You could just find a wall and put a piece of tape that to target as you jump.

 

You could always do standing long jumps. That's been a standard for explosiveness for a long time and was in the original Olympics.

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Connor Davies

Standing long jumps are pretty good, especially when you do them from one leg, starting with a pistol squat.

 

Stairs are excellent for jumping.  All you need to do is be able to jump to whatever step 10 times in a row, then you can move one step higher.  Trains your co-ordination as well, which is always useful.

 

Skipping is pretty good for training reactive strength.  Coach recommended once skipping on one leg, but I think that might have been for calf development more than anything.

 

And of course, deadlifts, squats, O-lifts ect.

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chunky34

If I am not mistaken, in the BtGB ebook, it is written that the deck squat with its variation is a great way to increase vertical.

That make sense to me since you are using way more muscle that only your legs to drive the squat (and jump) up, very similar to the jumping motion.

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Shady_Jester

Going to implement standing long jumps and skipping over a rope in my routine... I think two times a week is enough (on my upper body days), and 5 mins of skipping and 5 mins of long jumping (I think that limitation in time is better than doing sets and reps - Coach said that his athletes do this while developing dynamic lower body strength - they don't do it for sets and reps; they rather do it for a certain timespan).

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Bill Köhntopp

Just a tip from me...talk to someone beeing in a basketball team, i read over the years a few articles, and plyometric training is one of there major methods for jumping explosive. you can find some training ideas of them in the web :) if not visit training

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Matthew Proulx

Rope jumping is a good way to develop calves, great for tendon and joint health, but unless you are doing double unders you will benefit little in the explosive department, there is just not enough demand when jumping rope, I spend 30-45 mins jumping 3-4 times a week, use it as my warm up and cooldown every workout also, Great for developing awareness, balance, speed and timing, but not an explosive tool, you want power, and the only way to develop power is through force, force = mass x acceleration, sprinting, box jump, high jump, long jump, etc.

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Shady_Jester

Better to do both of them then (2 days a week; 5 mins long jumps; 5 min rope jumping). So I will develop balance, speed and timing, but also explosiveness (with long jumps; since I don't have a box).

 

Thanks for your answers! Will definietly implement these things into my workout!

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Fred Mak

Rope jumping is a good way to develop calves, great for tendon and joint health, but unless you are doing double unders you will benefit little in the explosive department, there is just not enough demand when jumping rope, I spend 30-45 mins jumping 3-4 times a week, use it as my warm up and cooldown every workout also, Great for developing awareness, balance, speed and timing, but not an explosive tool, you want power, and the only way to develop power is through force, force = mass x acceleration, sprinting, box jump, high jump, long jump, etc.

hey matt,

 

you mentioned that jumping rope is great for joint health.  i thought jumping rope was bad for your knees?

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Cody Ward

hey matt,

 

you mentioned that jumping rope is great for joint health.  i thought jumping rope was bad for your knees?

If you're extremely out of shape and go straight into jumping rope, you'll probably encounter some problems. 

I lost 60lbs just jumping rope and had no knee problems.

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Luka Kopusar

you might want to look into "Vertical Jump Bible" book, it has everything, from explanation to exercises to planning :)

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Alessandro Mainente

F series is necessary to build up strong legs and joint for basic strength. once a basic strength is developed you can decrease the weight and start to develop the transfert over explosive strength. start prematurely the explosive journey probably will result in joints injuries. you need to build up gradually your joints to support the perceived force impact due to explosive movements.

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Marios Roussos

My understanding is that the M series is going to address this. M1 comes out this spring I believe.

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Brad Mifsud

The force velocity curve basically shows that the more force you apply the slower the velocity and conversely the lower the force the faster the velocity. In sports like sprinting they train various areas with different exercises. Eg- heavy squats for the slow velocity high force, plyometrics for middle of the curve and of course sprinting for high velocity.

Your training program should include elements of each as they will all combine to assist you jump higher. Furthermore, depending on your current status and weight you may want to focus on one if it's weak to build structures (ie heavy lifts) then progress from there. They will all feature in your program though.

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