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Andrew Graham

anterior/posterior inominate OR spinal torsion?

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Andrew Graham

Hi guys

 

i'll make it short as i can! If i lay supine with my knees up and heals about 6inches away from my glutes, my right ASIS is about quarter inch higher than my left! also when i look at my knees i notice my right one is slightly higher than the left. However, if i slightly twist my hips clockwise...everything levels out...but i'm not relaxed, i have to hold this position to keep it level.

 

My question is, how do i know whether or not the right pelvis is anteriorly rotated or whether or not i have a torsion in my lumbar??

 

thanks

 

 

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Keilani Gutierrez

with a thomas test ^_^ (if i remember correctly, the shortest leg will be the one which is locked inward the most and by that, its the one who is tilted anteriorly the most)

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Andrew Graham

a thomas test, tests for hip flexor in-adequacies not pelvic inominates.

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Keilani Gutierrez

really? oh then disregard that then :) i thought it had to do with that but you're right, it would probably be influence from something up top.

in that case, how about you test your oblique and lower back/quadratus lumborum?

i used to do a lot of "towards the right" 360's on my bike and thats why i have not only my right leg shorter but also my right side of my hip a little higher.

what are your thoughts on that?

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Andrew Graham

Yer i've managed to level out my pelvis 'elevation' wise..but something is influencing either a torsion or inominate.

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Emanuele Lo Curto

There are people who use the Thomas' test to check for pelvic tilt instead of hip flexors' lenght but obviously the two are related; i'm thinking of the Postural Restoration Institute. According to their protocol an elevated right hip is usually the norm, togethere with a pelvis rotated clockwise and an anterior tilt on the left. IMO they are overly dogmatic on some stances but i think their exercises could be useful in your case: look for activation differences between the left and right hamstrings and adductors (the left side usualy being weaker, together with a weaker right gluteus maximus). You can try the "90 90 hip lift with hemibridge" exercise to check for hamstrings differences and the "right sidelying left adductor pullback" for adductors (I know weird names  :P); do them on both sides as a test but note that they should be done only on one side if you use them to address an imbalance.

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Parth Rajguru

Get evaluated/treated by a physiotherapist, osteopath, chiropractor, or physician that knows how to do the necessary orthopedic tests.

 

Having said that, it sounds like pelvic torsion to me, although it is impossible to know for sure on the internet. I would first look for dysfunctional relationships between the QL and contralateral psoas.

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superman7

Thomas test, tests for hip flexor in-adequacies not pelvic inominates.

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S. Ravnstag

If it's a chiropractor, I recommend one who is certified by CBP (chiropractic biophysics). There are some weird ones out there, but CBP doctors generally know their stuff.

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