Jump to content
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...
colcio

Dynamic and strenght training.Please Help!!!!

Recommended Posts

colcio

Hi

Guys how should i use my rope climbing and other dynamic exercises in my strenght training?

I read coache's post about doing dynamic strength as a seperate period in training unless you're advanced athelete.

I'm not a gymnast but I use a lot of gymnastic exercises to condition myself for wrestling.

I have few goals like Iron cross or one hand pull-up.Would doing lower reps and higher reps in one training session be bad? would it be less benefitial for achiving some of my goals? or

For example after doing

3x3-5 iron cross sets can i climb the rope? (climbing the rope would be about 15 pull-ups) or maby I should add some weight and go up half the way?

If I did 3x10 Muscle-ups and after did weighted chin-ups would that be right?

How about doing 2-3 heavy pulls and one dynamic push on one day and on the other day 2-3 heavy pushes and one dynamic pull ?

or maybe 2days of low heavy reps and one day dynamic push and pull with higher reps?

Please help I sent many other simmilar questions but find it hard to get any response.

Thanks

David

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
matthew.percussion

When you do higher repetitions it translates to a gain in your muscular endurance but not necessarily a gain in muscular(maximal) strength.

For example, a person who does only regular push-ups and could do 100 in a row has great muscular endurance. But since they don't work on planches and other harder variations of push-ups they will lack the strength to do things such as a planche.

On the other hand, someone who works on planche push-ups and can do 10-15 of them has great muscular strength. In most cases this person will also be able to easily do high repetitions on regular push-ups.

If you were to do 4 sets of a high weight/low repetitions of an exercise, and then later do low weight/high repetitions with the same exercise, it would work out to be like working endurance.

In my opinion it would be best to split it between days.

Hope this helps. Good Luck

-Matthew

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
colcio

Thanks Matthew.

When you do higher repetitions it translates to a gain in your muscular endurance but not necessarily a gain in muscular(maximal) strength.

For example, a person who does only regular push-ups and could do 100 in a row has great muscular endurance. But since they don't work on planches and other harder variations of push-ups they will lack the strength to do things such as a planche.

On the other hand, someone who works on planche push-ups and can do 10-15 of them has great muscular strength. In most cases this person will also be able to easily do high repetitions on regular push-ups.

If you were to do 4 sets of a high weight/low repetitions of an exercise, and then later do low weight/high repetitions with the same exercise, it would work out to be like working endurance.

In my opinion it would be best to split it between days.

Hope this helps. Good Luck

-Matthew

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Joshua Naterman

It is best to train for only one training effect per session. If you do a lot of endurance work and then a small amount of strength work at the end, your body is going to respond more to the strength work then the endurance, and you are not going to get the full effect of either the strength training or the endurance training if it is done in a single session.

What you CAN do is take the whole workout you are planning to do, sets and reps and everything, and break it apart into just strength and just endurance. As long as you have at least 4 hours of rest between the two sessions, your body will fully respond to each session. This is an advanced method of training and is easy to overtrain because it's easy to forget that your body is still healing from session one as well as what you do in session two, but when you are careful to do just enough to get the training effect, this method of having multiple sessions maximizes the athlete's accumulation of strength and endurance. You can and should have separate sessions for power and agility as well.

Remember, it doesn't take all that much to stimulate a training effect. Be smart, increase your workloads and volume slowly, and have a blast!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Chris Hobbs

For my current cycle I am integrating a small amount of dynamic strength work after the main strength work is completed. Not much, as you can only have one real focus as noted already, but enough to help with some carry-over and further prepare my body for the work ahead. Take a look at the WOD entries for some examples of how it has been integrated previously.

- Chris

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Spencer Kelleher

Can anyone verify what Joshua is explaining? If I ease into the intensity can I include HIIT for multiple muscle groups and strength training on the same day? I do fairly straight forward strength training, nothing very CNS intensive like deadlifts, just my baby planche progressions, L-sit, dips, OAP progressions etc.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Alessandro Mainente

if you can hold a heavy endurance session of one type like push or pull or core, you've finished F4 probably.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Please sign in to comment

You will be able to leave a comment after signing in



Sign In Now

×

Important Information

Please review our Privacy Policy at Privacy Policy before using the forums.