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Coach Sommer

Fastest Way to Build Handstand Pushups

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Hewi

So i started training for freestanding headstand pushups, but they are so damn hard :D

I can do several reps of HesPu against the wall, and i started training freestanding HS a while ago.

The book says that you only need a controlled ascent, and i was wondering that how do you

learn the descent for the pushup if it is hard to balance? Sorry if this is stupid :P

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Nick Van Bockxmeer
Coach Sommer, I have a question: can I build more pull-ups and chin-ups in bars with the same method

it won't work as well seeing as you don't have to stabilise yourself in a hang.

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Marcelo Lara
Coach Sommer, I have a question: can I build more pull-ups and chin-ups in bars with the same method

it won't work as well seeing as you don't have to stabilise yourself in a hang.

Thanks

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Erik Sjolin

Sorry if this has been covered in another thread, or earlier in this one, but is there a specific spot in the HeSPU where you can rest if need be? Without coming back down of course. I would think that it would be either at the top of the press or down at the (quasi) shoulder stand.

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Joshua Naterman

Trying to start from a dead stop at the bottom after already being tired is very, very hard. I honestly don't think that intra-set "rest" really accomplishes much. You're better off ending the set when you can't use good form, in my opinion.

Keep in mind that my opinion is heavily biased, because I have shoulder issues that flare up bad when I try to do what you are suggesting, while I have no problems and great gains by sticking to straight sets. If you're talking about resting for 3-5 minutes between sets without coming down, then I think you're not thinking well lol! But that's just me.

In my opinion, come down and rest when you can't do more properly.

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Erik Sjolin
Trying to start from a dead stop at the bottom after already being tired is very, very hard. I honestly don't think that intra-set "rest" really accomplishes much. You're better off ending the set when you can't use good form, in my opinion.

Nah, what I meant was starting from a headstand (I'm at about a 3 inch elevation atm), pressing up, lowering back down, taking one or two breaths before pressing back up again (using the wall the whole time). I was wondering if that was improper form and if I should only pause at the top of the handstand. I can sort of forsee that when I get to the single bar HSPU (in BtGB) I may have trouble since I'll spend the whole time under tension.

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Joshua Naterman

At first I'd say it's not a problem, since you're actually working harder that way. It's hard to press up from a dead stop! I'd definitely get to where you don't need to do that for any of your sets before you start lowering the elevation.

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Finnbar McAlinden

Coach,

You said that free balance HS on rings is the best for building this kind of strength, how about holding a handstand on the rings using the straps for balance? Is this a suitable substitute until I am able to free balance on rings? I do practise free balancing HS on floor but would like to know if strap HS on rings would be a useful addition before I jump into it :)

Thanks

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Joshua Naterman

Believe it or not, holding the shoulder stand for time will build a huge amount of strength over time. This is probably best done with paralletes, though you could stack cinder blocks or make a special 16" tall platform if you want to do this on flat ground. If you do this, make sure to have padding all around and practice your "escape strategy!"

XR HS is a bicep tendon conditioner for ring strength. You should be at least slightly RTO the whole time. First, you'll want to wrap your feet around the straps, eventually you will just need to press your feet against the inside of the straps without wrapping, and finally you'll be able to free-balance.

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Cody Clark

Is just holding the Handstand just to build reps in HSPU or to help move on to next harder varation like from Headstand to Fulll range HSPU?

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Joshua Naterman

I don't know what you're asking, Cody.

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Cody Clark

Does holding a Handstand long period of time just to help adding reps in Handstand Pushups? Like going from 10 to 15 reps. Or will holding the Handstand postion for time develop the strength to be able to do full range Handstand Pushups?

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Joshua Naterman

That's a question that I think Coach has to answer. I don't have the answer to the ultimate goal of the long handstand work beyond strengthening the shoulders and making them more difficult to injure. It probably helps with some part of press handstands as well.

You're only going to build strength in the HSPU variations by actually practicing them and through the other work we do in the WODs. I don't think that the handstand holds do very much for the HeSPU or HSPU. It's not nothing, I mean I couldn't do any HeSPU until I had a 45s wall handstand easily. I could be wrong about that, I just don't know.

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Deft-Mastery
Another tip that will help to increase your HSPU strength is to simply hold some of your handstands in a bent arm position. This is actually quite a bit of fun and helps to break up the monotony.

How would this be? Lowering down close to the floor? Or just bending the arms a little?

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Joshua Naterman

Wherever you feel like you are weak! Preferably close to but not AT the lowest ROM point you can control your body in. Once you are easily doing 10-20s holds for a few weeks lower down another inch. This tends to build strength relatively quickly.

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sarabia

Hello! i hope you are all doing good.

If it is ok i'll like to give a tip for those of you, who can do a handstand but can't press up. "tuck your elbows when pushing up or coming down" have a look at this video on. http://planchetraining.blogspot.com hope this help!!!

all the best and thank you for your attention.

.Luis Ernesto Sarabia

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Joshua Naterman

Great site Mr. Sarabia! Very nice of you to make some videos for your fellow acrobats! Quite a life you have led!

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Cole Dano
Hello! i hope you are all doing good.

If it is ok i'll like to give a tip for those of you, who can do a handstand but can't press up. "tuck your elbows when pushing up or coming down" have a look at this video on. http://planchetraining.blogspot.com hope this help!!!

all the best and thank you for your attention.

.Luis Ernesto Sarabia

Thanks for paying us a visit Luis, hope you have time to do so again. Your site is very nice, and you display wonderful skills, it great that you are sharing the secret with us all.

I have it on bookmark and have enjoyed all the tips so far, hope it goes well for you. Please take care of your back.

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sarabia

Thanks to all for a nice Welcome!

I like to apologise for advertising my blog here..it wasn't my intention. my respect to all of you and the person behind this wonderful forum!

very happy to be here!!!

all the best.

Luis sarabia

:(:(:(

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Chris Hansen
The fastest way to build strength in handstand pushups also happens to be the easiest; simply spend more time in a handstand. Anywhere from 10 to 20 minutes should be appropriate for most athletes. This is total time including both work and rest, although try not to go overboard with rest times.

Free balancing on the rings is the absolute king and will lead to strength increases over an incredible range of exercises. Next is free balancing on either the floor or parallets. Finally for those who are as yet unable to free balance, wall handstands will also give a nice return for the effort involved.

Another tip that will help to increase your HSPU strength is to simply hold some of your handstands in a bent arm position. This is actually quite a bit of fun and helps to break up the monotony.

Yours in Fitness,

Coach Sommer

How should this be integrated into the rest of the workout schedule? Would it work to separate by doing your normal workout in the morning and practice handstands in the evening?

Thanks

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Cole Dano

You can certainly do this as its own practice separate from the workout on what ever order you choose.

As part of the workout it can be in warmup or cool down.

Handstands are one of those elements that can be programed very with great versatility.

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Aaron Griffin

I've been adding supplemental handstand practice in the morning before I shower. It has helped me a lot. But I'm still not even close to free-balancing. Should I work stomach-to-wall only? Right now I do a mix of kick-up and walk-up handstands.

About how long does it take a person to get to a free standing handstand?

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Alexander Moreen

How long can you hold one against a wall? If you are around 1 min or so then keep doing some to maintain your strength and just kick up into freestanding handstands and try to hold them, that's pretty much the only real way to do it. You need to figure the balance out and develop the stabilizing muscles.

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Aaron Griffin
How long can you hold one against a wall? If you are around 1 min or so then keep doing some to maintain your strength and just kick up into freestanding handstands and try to hold them, that's pretty much the only real way to do it. You need to figure the balance out and develop the stabilizing muscles.

I generally do them in sets of 60s, but can go for almost 2 minutes. Do you mean kick up near a wall? Or do it in the center of a room?

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Eddie Stelling

Kick up on a wall (back to wall) and push one foot against the wall and start easing the other away from the wall. Once you start to feel balanced, ease the other off the wall until both feet are not touching. You will start to feel the balance. Try to make sure that your hips and shoulders are in line and your back isn't arched. Then when you get a feel for it, go to a carpeted room or in grass and try it. Tuck and roll if you go to far forward, don't try to catch yourself in a back bend. This usually ends in a painful backflop! However, once you can do a freestanding handstand, move to a hard surface, its much easier to balance on than grass or carpet.

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