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Fluidity

Higher Threshold Units Training Protocol

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Fluidity

I was just wondering, when it comes to dynamic/explosive training in general, how does load and rep range come into play when training for specific goals?

 

I understand that high reps of explosive movements(low load of course) have a tendon/connective tissue healing effect due to the blood flow resulting from it, and the plyometrics in general will strengthen tendons and increase muscle-tendon unit elasticity, however how does it change once the load becomes higher and the reps get lower? Does power generation become the focus?

 

If jumping squats are something you can do for 20+ reps, then what type of effect would low rep weighted jumps do? Are they more on the side of pure power generation rather than explosive endurance?

 

Along with that how can you build a hypertrophy program specifically for type 2b fast twitch muscle fibers?  In my case (using barbells/dumbells) would it mean to fatiguing my muscle with explosive lifts (X-0-X tempo).

 

Poliquin had put some interesting routine regarding hypertrophy for those with fast twitch muscle fibers

http://www.charlespoliquin.com/ArticlesMultimedia/Articles/Article/805/Arm_Hypertrophy_for_Fast-Twitch_Individuals.aspx

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Brian Li

Yes low rep high intensity power exercises or plyometrics will focus on pure power development. Getting fatigued or to failure with power movements would turn into an endurance workout which would be detrimental to power development and explosiveness. So when doing a set of power exercises, you should stop the set once you feel a drop in performance per rep.

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Fluidity

Yes low rep high intensity power exercises or plyometrics will focus on pure power development. Getting fatigued or to failure with power movements would turn into an endurance workout which would be detrimental to power development and explosiveness. So when doing a set of power exercises, you should stop the set once you feel a drop in performance per rep.

What about the idea of promoting hypertrophy among the type2b muscle fibers which are the ones with the highest power generating ability? If they have the greatest potential for growth can poliquin's program work? 

 

I just want to delve further into the hypertrophy aspect, when long and slow TUT doesn't hit them that well for growing what does? Will a program like 10 sets by 3 reps(6 rep max) work? Or does 5 sets with 3 rep max work better due to the higher load and same X0X tempo?

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Tyler Gibson

I'm going to refer you elsewhere, because my response would basically be a summary of other people's work on the topic of high threshold motor unit recruitment. Check out Christian Thibaudeau's book High Threshold Muscle Building, it is exactly what you're looking for. He outlines 11 strategies for maximally recruiting HTMUs. For example, you've probably heard the suggestion to move the weight as fast as possible. This is one of CTs strategies because trying to move weight quickly (the actual speed of the movement is redundant as long as you are trying to move it as fast as possible)  is a powerful way of tapping into to HTMUs. If you don't want to buy his book, check out his articles on the same subject on tnation.com. Also, this is a gymnastics forum. I know there are a lot of knowledgable people here, but your question about weight training might be more appropriate somewhere dedicated to weight training.

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Joshua Naterman

Yea, adidas summed this up quite nicely...

 

You really have to try and learn, for yourself, about force production and neuromuscular physiology. Picking up a basic exercise physiology book from the last 5 years or so will be a great start, and a specific neuromuscular physiology textbook will help you understand how this works after you have established a good foundation in basic exercise physiology.

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Fluidity

Yea, adidas summed this up quite nicely...

 

You really have to try and learn, for yourself, about force production and neuromuscular physiology. Picking up a basic exercise physiology book from the last 5 years or so will be a great start, and a specific neuromuscular physiology textbook will help you understand how this works after you have established a good foundation in basic exercise physiology.

That's exactly what I'm gonna start doing Josh  :) By the way would you know of any hypertrophy specific books that are worth reading?

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Nic Branson

Most worthwhile books will have information on both. The ones I referred you to look at have both for you.

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ASForum

Most worthwhile books will have information on both. The ones I referred you to look at have both for you.

Looked through the thread but did not see any names. Which ones? 

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Razz

science and practice of strength training by zatsiorsky is a good start.

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