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matthew.percussion

Homemade Stall Bars at Gymnastic Strength Blog

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Luke Leaman

Oh man, PERFECT! THANK YOU!!!!

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Coach Sommer

Stall bars are an outstanding piece of equipment and an essential part of my athlete's preparation. This home design should prove invaluable to many people. One note of caution however, most stall bars are 3' wide; I have some concerns that 4' wide will allow the dowels to be too unstable with too much flex. Other than that small correction, they look quite good.

Yours in Fitness,

Coach Sommer

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gekitsu

coach, is a 3' width actually needed for most uses outlined in your book? i remember stall bars from all the sports halls i had p.e. in, but always thought that the stuff i read about in this forum and your book could actually be done on stall bars slightly wider than a common ladder.

unless i miss something important, such a compact solution might be feasible for a lot of DIY and home-training people.

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Coach Sommer

Three feet wide is the general standardized width of stall bars; however four feet wide would be excellent IF the issue of enough stability could be resolved. Possible solutions include;

1) Using a wider diameter wooden dowel (1.5"-2"). This is an approach that I have employed in the past, however the bigger dowel quickly exhausts the grip and the grip has a tendency to fail (especially while inverted!) before the exercises on the stall bars can be completely correctly. Thus defeating the purpose of training on the stall bar in the first place.

2) Using a section of 1"-1.25" piping rather than wooden doweling for the rungs of the stall bar.

I should also mention that the final top rung should be offset outward approximately 2"-3" from the rest of the rails to remove pressure from the forearms when hanging.

Yours in Fitness,

Coach Sommer

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Walt Peacock

Whats up fellas. I appreciate matthewmovement showing everyone my stall bars. They are actually 36 inches wide. There are no instability issues. They work perfectly for me. I am 5'5" at about 155lbs.

I didn't include an offset top rung due to the fact that I am limited on space in my garage.

By the way it cost $54 for all the materials at Lowes. It took about 1.5 hours to build and install them.

If you have any questions on them let me know.

Walt

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matthew.percussion

Hey suprtank.

When I was posting this I was trying to remember if you were a member of the board... I couldn't recall though, hope you don't mind that I posted this up here for ya.

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Walt Peacock

I don't mind at all. I appreciate it and am excited that someone besides me thought enough about them to post it!

Take care.

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Ricky Dawson

Hi All,

My friend (a carpenter) is going to build me a set of stall bars. Could you please clarify the dimensions for them?

I know the they are generally 3 foot wide...

but would like to know, how much does the top part over hand by?

Whats the gap in between rungs?

whats the diameter of the rungs?

the measurements of the suppoerting vertical bits of wood...

i had a diagram once, that i found on google of the measurements but dont seem to be able to find it. Does anyone else have it?

thanks, Ricky

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Mark Weaver

Ricky,

When I was looking into this, several of the sites that sold them had the measurements we're looking for. For example:

Description: Build upper body strength the old-fashioned way with this updated gymnasium classic. Constructed of micro laminated poplar and featuring 15 hickory rungs ( 1-3/8" diameter). Each Stall Bars module is 8' high x 3' wide. Lower rungs are spaced 5.5" apart . Top rung is 8" higher and offset 3.5" out from the others. Field assembly required. Mounting hardware will differ depending upon building construction and must be ordered directly from your local supplier.

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jeninja

I found that the stall bars were fairly easy to build. I used 2x8 by 8" for the two uprights. I layed out my holes for the i-1/4" "closet rods" every 6" on center and offset the top rod 3" on center. I used a augur bit as it holds up a bit longer considering you have to drill 30 holes. Also, make sure your drill isn't a cheapo with poor torque or you will definately burn it up. It took me about three hours to cut the rods to size (36") and drill all the holes.

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LLF

How important are stall bars? I don't have one, but I found a 3' wide 6' tall steel bed frame with 13 square bars spaced 5" apart lying around the house:

stall-bars.jpg

*ignore the blacked out part.

Now the problem is mounting it against a wall as it is quite heavy. What do you guys think? Is it safe?

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Michael Dwan

As far as the type of wood is concerned. Are there any that I should avoid? Obviously Oak would work, but are there any that might not? There will be individuals around 200lbs hanging on this bad boy.

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jamesters

Ya, nickvb posted this. I was going to take pictures and show him what I made, but I gave the finished product to my gym a couple weeks ago and they've yet to set it up! :evil:

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thematrixiam

[quote="mark"

Description]

I'm a little confused here.

So each bar is 5.5" apart. Got that part.

But what does 8" higher and offset of 3.5 mean?

Does that mean - 5.5+8 = 13.5 inches above the last rung?

And offset of 3.5", no clue what offset means or how the 3.5" apply to it.

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Joshua Naterman

Honestly, either way will work. You could have it a foot higher than the next highest or just 8" higher, but 8" would be more "normal."

Offset means the top bar is literally 3.5" forward of the regular bars. You do this by putting an extra 2x2 or 2x4 piece on the front of the stall bars at the top.That way your shoulders aren't stretched as far when holding yourself for HLL and such, which is very nice. Personally, I have two top bars so that when I want a bigger stretch I can have it.

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Richard Duelley

I just started building my own but mine are going to be about 9' tall. The reason being is that at a dead hang I am over 8' tall so with a little safety factor on the hang part for (pointed toes etc) I set the top bar at 8'6". I am using 2x8s for the side rails so I have plenty of room to off set the rungs from the wall and offset the last rung from the rest of the regular rungs. Everything is currently measured out and I just need to hit the drill press for a while. :mrgreen:

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Richard Duelley

I forgot about this post but here is a pic of the finished bars. When I get a second I have some construction pictures as well.

2757622480068627946S425x425Q85.jpg

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n01d

Hi all,

I am trying to build plans for stall bars that must be behind my bed (should maximize my space, you know...) My bed is 54' large, and my ceiling, at 100' high, which permits approximatively 87' tall structure.

Since every construction I found on the internet seems to be for a lot less large bars, I was wondering what materials could hod my 150 lbs wheight.

Is steel not recommended? steel bars would roll on themselves when I do exercices...

The question is: what could be 54 inches long and fully support my wheight.

Thanks for any answer on the topic!

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mattlukey

Thanks for all the valuable information on here! I really wanted to build a set of these stall bars without breaking the bank. We were able to put together a solid pair of these for around $200. Money well spent! Here are some pictures of the final product:

post-51887-13531537347115_thumb.jpg

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Cole Dano

You built those yourself? Looks really nice.

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mattlukey

Thanks, I included some of the pictures of construction. One of our members had a sweet shop and we knocked this out over a few days are work.

post-51887-13531537348267_thumb.jpg

post-51887-13531537348018_thumb.jpg

post-51887-13531537347768_thumb.jpg

post-51887-13531537347514_thumb.jpg

Great investment if you have access to a shop!

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FREDERIC DUPONT

Nicely done mattlukey, thanks for sharing these pics.

Fred

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Tyler Schmitz

NIcely Done! Last year I constructed mine as a single section without the top forward rung for around 90 to 100 dollars. I wonder if a guy could build these upon order and sell them on eBay for some extra cash...LOL..problem is, I doubt there's a large enough buyers market for these besides us.

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