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Daniel Luketic

Training volume

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Daniel Luketic

Hello,

I think I might need more volume in ny training. Would it be possible to train Upper body, Handstands, Core and legs twice a week? I always feel like I can do more and I kind of just wait around for the next week to train again. I have lots of energy and hardly feel sore. Stretching would be as usual.

Has anyone else had a similar experience? Interested to see what you guys think. 

Thanks,

Daniel.

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Alessandro Mainente

HI Daniel, the common tendency on defining "sore" as a universal word for all the type fo training is wrong. powerlifter feels sore like a gymnast after conditioning? for sure no. what you are feeling is low energy consumption and it has nothing to do with central nervous system recovery. the ability of the brain to adapt is definitely slow compared to the energy and biochemical component of the body. the primary goal of the beginner is brain adaptation and ability to recover. until reaching at least foundations 2 for all the elements there is no necessity of more complex programming. one exception can be made if you are reaching a plateau.

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Cristian Fournies

I have the same feeling, that the workout are not intense enough. It’s being almost 2 month and still feel the same, when do you reach to foundations 2? Not sure if I’m there 

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Alessandro Mainente

Gentleman, you are confusing the perceived intensity with the upper system intensity. they are completely different things. you can be exhausted by a CrossFit workout that is demanding if we talk about the effort, but the more the energy demanding the less the intensity on the central nervous system. on GB the major stress is the brain with all the alignment, the body control, positions, activation, doing a great job leads to much more stress on the central nervous system compared to a workout where you feel tired.

feeling tired does not mean that the workout was light on your brain, usually is the opposite.

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Miklavz Bevc

Daniel,

I can confirm from personal experience that Coach Sommer's gymnastic-based exercises create greater results on less time - and lower perceived exertion as Alessandro pointed out - than some other exercise systems. I will describe also what has worked for me in terms of volume:

Regarding the former, I had previously trained in a BUD/S-derived program (high volume calisthenics and cardio) before starting the original Gymnastic Bodies program (the book). Doing the GB program's static and dynamic exercises 4 days a week, after one "mastery" cycle I was able to do 17 pull-ups in a row with perfect form; whereas under the BUD/S program this had taken 7 weeks to achieve doing hours of conditioning 6 days a week.

I believe the reason for this is that GB involves a more comprehensive, graduated approach that better recruits and conditions under-developed small muscle groups and stabilizers, so you will not necessarily feel the same "burn" versus a program that focuses solely on large muscle groups. Point being with GB perceived exertion is not necessarily a useful measure on which to gauge whether you are training enough - at least until you have conditioned the under-developed small muscle groups / stabilizers and are safely able to advance to more difficult progressions, which will tax both and you *will* feel!

Now as to your question regarding how much volume to program, this is ultimately different for each person, driven in large part by your cumulative training over time; the body over longer periods of time (months and even years) can adapt to successfully accept higher training volume. What you are trying to achieve remember is a training adaptation, which requires both the introduction of a training load and (crucially) recovery; if you do not provide adequate recovery for the body to adapt in response to the training stimulus, you will either plateau or burn out and be forced to rest and re-trench. At the end of the day, you will have to test through trial and error how much training load you can employ without compromising your continued, long-term progress.

It sounds from what you say that you likely have been an athlete for some time and therefore could profit from higher volume. What has always worked well for me in striking the right balance and making great progress is 4 days per week structured as:

Mon: front lever (FL), straddle planche (SPl), hollow back press (HBP), rope climb (RC), handstand (HS)

Tues: side lever (SL), manna (MN), single leg squat (SLS)

Thurs: FL, SPl, HBP, RC

Fri: SL, MN, SLS, HS

Like you, I don't necessarily feel too much exertion from the GB exercises alone; I supplement this schedule with significant cardio (cycling) throughout the week plus on Mon / Fri a couple of isolated weightlifting movements (don't tell Coach). Again, no injury and uninterrupted progress.

Hope this is helpful and best of luck!


Mik

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