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Edward Healy

Stall Bars for heavier athletes

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Edward Healy

Hi All,

Been working through F1 and I'd like to pick up a set of stall bars. In scanning previous questions on the topic, I've noticed I'm quite a bit heavier than others that have inquired (5'10" 230lbs.) . Would the initially recommended Durabod set suffice or should I be looking at other / more heavy duty options? 

Any feedback is greatly appreciated.

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Pauline Taube

Hi Edward,

I recommend this thread for more information on how to build your own stall bars

 

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Nick Murray

If you are at all concerned, get metal stall bars. The grip is not as good as it is with wood, but that's the tradeoff you make. Depending on the finish/coating of each rung, though, some metal bars may be better than others. Knurled finishes, such as the grips on a chinup bar, are too aggressive - in some elements your grip will be moving (as opposed to a chinup where the grip usually stays static). Something that's a rough powder coating would be ideal, so if possible, try to find bars in-person so you can feel the surface.

If you don't like the commercially available metal bars, then a commercial set of stall bars is preferable: ask what load they are rated at, and note that any dynamic movement (such as hanging from the top rung and lifting your legs) will put MUCH more force through the bars than your weight of 230 lb. This is why design factors (the difference between the maximum working load and the rated, safe, "working" load)  are usually 10:1, that is, the if the stall bars are rated at 250lb, then they should be designed for 2500lb.

Putting it another way: one Foundations element involves being upside down on the bars, hanging on with your hands, and lifting your legs up and down. If a rung were to fail in this position, you could be injured quite severely. As most people seem to train on their own, having good equipment is essential.

 

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