Ryan Graczkowski

Programming Power Into/Alongside The Foundation Series

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Ryan Graczkowski    3
Ryan Graczkowski

Hello everyone!

I've been mostly quiet on the forums simply because any question I had prior could be solved with the careful use of the search tool. There's a lot of information here, and I appreciate all the input I've seen. However, in searching for the answer to this question, I was unable to find something that addressed my specific concern. It could be that I did not search well, and if this has been addressed in other topics then I apologize for being superfluous.

I come to GST from a martial arts background with some kettlebell, calisthenics, and weightlifting thrown in. And to be frank, I love it. I got into GST after futzing around with 5/3/1, and it's been awesome to my joints. I feel better, and as a result I'm able to do the things I like to do, whether it's hiking for miles and miles or helping my friends move. At present, GST and martial arts are the bulk of my training, along with a couple of days of kettlebell swings and TGUs to keep me honest.

At present, I am working through F1 and the initial HS series, and it's definitely living up to its word as far as mixing strength and conditioning and providing me with a solid amount of GPP. However, there doesn't seem to be any emphasis on power development. Which is something that I feel I need. It's constantly brought up as a thing that should be developed by a martial artist, and it's not something that's receiving a great deal of emphasis at the moment.

I understand that kettlebells can be useful for power development. At present, I can do 10x10 One Arm Swings with 32 kg in five minutes, so it seems reasonable to believe I'm past the point where the kettlebells I have can provide additional power. Obviously, I could save up and buy something heavier, but that's expensive and takes time.

So, my question is: given where I am in GST, is it reasonable to program additional power work at the beginning of the session? Or is this something that is addressed later on in the Foundation series?

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Alessandro Mainente    8,536
Alessandro Mainente

HI Ryan power develpment with bodyweigth training focused on GST requires much more physical preparation than foundations 1. one example of power it is hadstand hops where you bend the elbows and then you explode with a little jump. considering that power it is usually trained on 8-10 reps while maintianing the same level of speed..if you cannot show a proper handstand and at least controlled full rom handstand pushup you have not chances to develop power in the inverted position.

the same thing can be done for pulling. once a solid basic srenght it is achieve on rope climbing that means for exampl 2-3 laps in a row of 5 meters in your warm up you can begin with some pulling power work. 

these are only some examples. the cue it is that without an high basic strenght NO power should be trained, if not the result will be your elbows and shoulders exploding all the reps.

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Augusto Juarez    5
Augusto Juarez

Hey, fancy seeing you here. :)

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Ryan Graczkowski    3
Ryan Graczkowski
On 8/27/2017 at 11:08 AM, Alessandro Mainente said:

HI Ryan power develpment with bodyweigth training focused on GST requires much more physical preparation than foundations 1. one example of power it is hadstand hops where you bend the elbows and then you explode with a little jump. considering that power it is usually trained on 8-10 reps while maintianing the same level of speed..if you cannot show a proper handstand and at least controlled full rom handstand pushup you have not chances to develop power in the inverted position.

the same thing can be done for pulling. once a solid basic srenght it is achieve on rope climbing that means for exampl 2-3 laps in a row of 5 meters in your warm up you can begin with some pulling power work. 

these are only some examples. the cue it is that without an high basic strenght NO power should be trained, if not the result will be your elbows and shoulders exploding all the reps.

First off, I am so sorry it took me so long to get back to you. That was very rude of me, and I beg your pardon.

Anyway, sounds like I need to take my time and pay my dues.

I suppose using other implements like throwing medicine balls and the like are also out?

On 8/27/2017 at 1:17 PM, Augusto Juarez said:

Hey, fancy seeing you here. :)

Oh hey! Small world! What's a nice SFG like you doing in a place like this? :D

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Alessandro Mainente    8,536
Alessandro Mainente

Medicine ball throw it is more general and less linked to GST, it not a real body weight power exercise.

the intensity is of course reduced, I still recommend a decent base of strength before moving on accelerated movements.

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Ryan Graczkowski    3
Ryan Graczkowski

Understood! Thanks again!

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Kasper Stangerup    45
Kasper Stangerup

If your martial arts training involves decent amounts of sparring, you will run a greater risk of injury by not training than you do from overtraining. Just pick something that is less extreme than the examples that Alessandro mentioned, eg. clapping pushups, plyometric box jumps or kettlebell snatches rather than swings (personal favourite). Which martial art do you practice?

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