Jump to content
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...
Sign in to follow this  
Coach Sommer

Yewkis - A Multi-plane Pulling Movement

Recommended Posts

Coach Sommer

IAGMcEoDbg0

As you may be coming to realize, in Gymnastic Strength Training™ it is essential to attempt the integration of core strength with upper and lower body conditioning wherever possible. The body always functions as a single athletic unit and that is nowhere more apparent than in the sport of gymnastics. Explosive full body movements, swinging elements and extended body static strength holds are the order of the day in gymnastics, not an occasional occurrence. In gymnastics conditioning, a weak link will not simply result in a flawed physique, but in a drastically reduced ability to perform athletically. This truth applies to the gymnastics conditioning fitness enthusiast as well as to the competitive athlete.

Consider the body to athletically be a chain that is composed of three links; the upper, mid and lower. The glamour muscles of the torso generally receive the most attention, followed by work for the legs and then perhaps, if there is any time left, a small bit of mid-section conditioning may be thrown in. On review, it appears obvious that this approach is flawed; especially in an endeavor like gymnastics conditioning where the entire body must work together to perform even the simplest of movements.

Yewkis are a multi-plane pulling movement which simultaneously encompasses a pull-up, a row and a front lever. It should be noted that in addition to building pull-ups and rows, Yewkis also allow pulling strength to be developed in the arc of movement between the pull-up and the row. Gymnastics conditioning requires strength that is multi-dimensional; or more simply stated, strength that can be applied to maintain shape or to generate power as the body moves, rotates and changes its orientation in space. This expression of strength, occurring during a relatively constant change in physical orientation, requires a profound degree of core strength. Yewkis are an excellent tool for achieving this goal.

To perform Yewkis, begin from a standard hanging position. As you start to pull the chin up to the rings or bar, lean the shoulders backward while lifting the lower body forward up towards a front lever. Attempt to continue pulling and lifting until your elbows have reached approximately a 90 degree angle, your hands are approximately mid-way between your sternum and hips and your entire body is horizontal. Upon reaching the apex of your pull, reverse the motion and lower the body until reaching the hang position once more.

Do not allow the neck or the back to arch during the pull to the bent arm front lever. This is critical. If you find yourself unable to hold a flat or slightly hollow back during the ascent, you are attempting to use a variation that is beyond your current capabilities.

PROGRESSIONS:

1) Tuck Yewkis -

For this variation curl the body tightly into a ball and remain there during the entire repetition. This is the simplest of all the variations and requires the least core strength to perform.

2) Advanced Tuck Yewkis -

This variation is performed with the legs still tucked, but the back is now flat rather than curled as in a normal tuck. Flattening the back makes this variation surprisingly more challenging than a simple tuck Yewki.

3) Straddle Yewkis -

In addition to having a flat back, the hips will now be extended (flattened) with no angle or pike. The legs will be straddled to help to ease the transition to this more extended position. The wider the straddle the less load will be placed upon the core. Do not bend the knees during the straddle.

4) 1/2 Lay Yewkis -

The legs will now be brought together, however the knees will be bent at a 90 degree angle. This will greatly reduce the core strength required to maintain the hollow body position of the front lever.

5) Yewkis -

The body is now completely extended and hollow during the entire movement. This is the variation demonstrated in the video below. It will be quite demanding to pull the arms to a 90 degree bend during the bent arm front lever. If you are unable to achieve the correct arm position, you should return back to 1/2 lay Yewkis.

yewkis.jpg

Yours in Fitness,

Coach Sommer

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Alex

Thanks Coach!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
John Sapinoso

Very nice, I need to try this.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ricky Dawson

I guess this will win most predictable question award. but..

why is it called Yewkis?

is it pronounced You-kis or You-Kee's?

sorry for being so petty but things like this bother me ( i guess i have too much time on my hands at work :lol: )

Ricky

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
George Launchbury

Thanks Ricky ...it's going to bother me now as well!!! Here I was all happy that it was pronounced Yoo-keys, and now I don't know!?

:)

George.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Coach Sommer

They are named "Yewkis" (You-keys) after Yewki Tomita, the US National Team member that I originally learned them from.

Yours in Fitness,

Coach Sommer

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Scotty Hagnas

I was wondering what set/rep scheme one should work up to before progressing to the next harder variation?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Coach Sommer

What repetition range depends on the strength component being addressed with the exercise. For maximal strength, I would move up after becoming proficient at 3-5 reps. I would however recommend an under loading phase to consolidate gains prior to moving to the next variation. Generally this would mean remaining with the same variation, number of sets and number of reps for 6-8 weeks, or perhaps longer if your perceived level of effort is still relatively high.

Yours in Fitness,

Coach Sommer

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Bob Sanders

If you don't mind me asking. What was the name of that song used in the video? :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
SamSpaiser

How do I perform mulit-plane pulling of any form if my general pull up pulling skills are weak? All multi-plane pulling is harder than a regular pull up, which I lack proficiency in, and to train in recommended quantities, I need to perform jumping pull ups. How can I train multi-plane like this? Or do I wait until I'm better at pulling?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Coach Sommer
How do I perform mulit-plane pulling of any form if my general pull up pulling skills are weak?

If your pull-ups are weak, you are not yet strong enough for MPPu elements and should continue to focus on increasing your basic pull-up and row strength.

Yours in Fitness,

Coach Sommer

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Please sign in to comment

You will be able to leave a comment after signing in



Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×

Important Information

Please review our Privacy Policy at Privacy Policy before using the forums.