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Troy   Archie

Hanging Leg Lift with no Stall Bar

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Troy   Archie

I tried searching but couldn't find any previous posts on this.  I don't have access to stall-bars only pull-up bars that are nowhere near a wall.  Is it possible to do a true Hanging Leg Lift on a pull-up bar alone?  Has anyone out there come up with some wicked modifications?
Thanks
Troy

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Alessandro Mainente

Hi Troy, actually no, you need something behind your shoulders preventing the leaning back of them.

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Coach Sommer

Hi Troy,

As Alex already pointed out, very difficult to do so.

While not as good as stall bars, adjusting the grip used will help to minimize leaning back and the use of the lats during the ascent.  Try performing your HLL in a dorsal grip or hanging by a single arm.

Yours in Fitness,

Coach Sommer

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Bas Albinus

I just asked "support" the same question ... and got a different answer.
>>Great question! These exercises can be performed without stall bars, but as you have noticed it is difficult to execute proper form<< 
Well, trying to achieve 
proper form from the start is essential I think.
I'm working on improvising stall bars with a ladder. 
Meanwhile I'll try to do HLL with a dorsal grip as Coach suggests ...if only I could be clear about how exactly that would look like!?!
found gives this definition>

To perform the dorsal grip, simply grip the belt behind your glutes with your hands turned thumbs out, as though you were going to do a curl. As you move your shoulders over the top, your forearms will rotate outward and place you in a dorsal grip.
How to get into this position on a bar? I doubt I can get into it at all with my tight and damaged shoulders. Trying as above described with a belt/dowel I'm struggling. 

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Alessandro Mainente

Probably the one arm variation is the easier solution for you. 

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Bas Albinus

Ok, thanks...will give it a shot, but doubt I can hold that for more than 1rep.

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David Beckerman

To make sure I have this right in my head. A dorsal grip in this scenario would be doing HLL from a german hang position?

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Petri Widsten
17 hours ago, David Beckerman said:

To make sure I have this right in my head. A dorsal grip in this scenario would be doing HLL from a german hang position?

I thought it just meant having a supinated (chin-up) grip instead of the usual pronated grip.

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Suzanna McGee
3 hours ago, Petri Widsten said:

I thought it just meant having a supinated (chin-up) grip instead of the usual pronated grip.

Unfortunately, not. I thought so too at first, but it seem like that grip wouldn't do that much difference to the movement of the upper body, so I went to google "dorsal grip". Nothing I am going to do any time soon. One day, maybe :)

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David Beckerman
6 hours ago, Petri Widsten said:

I thought it just meant having a supinated (chin-up) grip instead of the usual pronated grip.

I thought so too initially which is why I wanted to clarify it

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Bas Albinus

Damn, I am German but there's no way I can hang with a dorsal grip!!! ;) Well, maybe some day. Trying dorsal grip dislocates for starters...and used this weekend to improvise stall bars with a ladder that I attached to a wall on my patio. Works well.

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Jean-Paul Wallace

Ok, so a bit of forward planning. When does the hanging leg lift come in - foundation one? or later? Will need to install some stall bars at home!!

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Mats Trane
3 hours ago, Jean-Paul Wallace said:

Ok, so a bit of forward planning. When does the hanging leg lift come in - foundation one? or later? Will need to install some stall bars at home!!

It comes in Foundation 2. You will love having stall bars at home. Together with a back strap you can do so many things!

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Jean-Paul Wallace

Heh Thanks Mats. Is it possible to list somewhere what all the equipment is for each course  -eg I would hate to buy foundation 2 only to realise I should get stall bars, when this could take a couple of weeks to buy and install.

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Everett Carroll

Hey Jean-Paul,

Below is a list of equipment for each course:

Fundamentals- none 

To start Foundation One- Floor space, rings, light dumbbell 

Later into Foundation One- Stahl bars and a back strap are very handy, parallel bars or similar setup for dipping variations,

Stretch- Yoga Block, Yoga Strap (optional) 
Resistance Band, Way to Elevate Feet (Bridge Only) 

Handstand- Wall, Dowel with Weight or Weighted Bar (5-10lbs) 

Tumbling- Wall and Floor Space 

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Luke Searra

@Troy Archie by no means will it be the same intensity/leverage but you can get the general feel of the leg raise more closely by lying on the floor and raising your legs similarly to the way you would on stall bars. Read again this is an extreme levelled down scale but another workaround.

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Alexander Egebak

A partner can push you forward as well.

On another note, I found that many sets of stalls bars (in Europa) have their upper rung only pushed a little outwards in comparison to the other rungs. This results in strain on the forearm bones, the neck as well as the upper back as ones legs reaches ones hands. I have found that putting a mat over and around the uppermost rungs helps alleviate this issue (as well as requiring more abs/hip flexor strength and more lats/chest flexibility).

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Luke Searra

Great, thank you Alexander, that will be useful information for coaching and training.

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