Jump to content
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...
Farid Mirkhani

L-hang, what touches the stall bar?

Recommended Posts

Farid Mirkhani

For a correct L-hang on stall bars, should the glutes also stay in contact with the stall bar or just the lower back?

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Alexander Egebak

The lower back should.

 

When attempting to ppt most people will feel their butt slide off the wall as the lower comes into contact with the wall.

 

That is quite natural.

  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Farid Mirkhani

I have a picture here from "Developing the hanging leg lift":

 

Somm3.jpg

 

I can't tell for sure if only his lower back touches it or the glutes as well.. But if it as you say it, Alexander, then it makes things easier. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Cole Dano

His glutes are off the bars.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Connor Davies

His glutes are off the bars.

Makes sense. If you're maintaining the correct pelvic tilt it would be very hard to have the glutes touch the stall bars in that position.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Katharina Huemer

I would also say your whole back should touch the bar, but not your glutes, at least it is like that for me!

If you start doing "real" leg lifts, like all the way up, this position will be different for everybody. If you have good compression and flexibility, your whole back will still touch the bars and only your toes will touch the upper bar.

If you have Bad compression and flexibility, your lower back will get off and your shins will touch the bar.

But no guarantee, just my personal opinion!

  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Connor Davies

If you have bad compression and flexibility, your lower back will get off and your shins will touch the bar.

This has been happening to me with my L->V HLL, and I've been getting a ridiculous amount of back activation. I haven't been worrying about it because I'm using them more as front lever prep than for active flexibility.

At some point I'm going to have to go back and fix all of the bad habits I'm building now, but in the mean time, front lever o'clock!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Please sign in to comment

You will be able to leave a comment after signing in



Sign In Now

×

Important Information

Please review our Privacy Policy at Privacy Policy before using the forums.