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lewkowicz613

How to tell when ligaments and tendons have adapted

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lewkowicz613

I recall the Coach saying that unlike muscle tissue ligaments and tendons take longer to adapt to a given stressor.  Is it possible to determine the time it takes to adapt? I'm assuming it can vary for different people.

Thanks

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Jesus Rojas

 Personally I think that the best way to keep the recovery ratio at the same rhythm is to follow an adequate programming that allow you to go through the cycles of load under-load and deload, recovery weeks etc...

Edited by chuchodani

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Léo Aïtoulha

"Metabolic rate of tendons and connective tissue is 1/10 of muscle tissue."

I think it is possible to determine the time it takes to adapt :

- with experience and knowledge

- with appropriate programs

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hype

If you use Steady state cycles of 8-12 weeks, by the 8th week your connective tissue should have adapted

Source : BtGB

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lewkowicz613

Will this apply if I only workout a given muscle group once per week (ie uppers every Monday, lowers every Wednesday)?

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Kai Liow

I think training only once a week will have really slow progress?

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Klemen Bobnar

Will this apply if I only workout a given muscle group once per week (ie uppers every Monday, lowers every Wednesday)?

You really want to have 2-3 sessions per week for any movement/lift to have optimal results. When training movements that place the most amount of stress on the connective tissue(like planche, etc. - straight arm strength), you should never feel it in the tendons. It should feel like it's not enough and like you could do more. Take a position like a planche lean: use minimal lean, build up to a couple of sets of reasonably long holds, increase the lean, drop the volume, build back up, rinse & repeat. Never during the process should you feel like your elbows are getting a workout. That's the safe way to be sure your connective tissues adapt. Other general pointers(for all your strength work): never go all out, always have a rep left in you; deload when appropriately. Use your bent arm strength work to build strength and muscle and treat straight arm work as a separate category, almost like skill work.

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Jon Douglas

You really want to have 2-3 sessions per week for any movement/lift to have optimal results. When training movements that place the most amount of stress on the connective tissue(like planche, etc. - straight arm strength), you should never feel it in the tendons. It should feel like it's not enough and like you could do more. Take a position like a planche lean: use minimal lean, build up to a couple of sets of reasonably long holds, increase the lean, drop the volume, build back up, rinse & repeat. Never during the process should you feel like your elbows are getting a workout. That's the safe way to be sure your connective tissues adapt. Other general pointers(for all your strength work): never go all out, always have a rep left in you; deload when appropriately. Use your bent arm strength work to build strength and muscle and treat straight arm work as a separate category, almost like skill work.

Nice post.

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lewkowicz613

When I do that many sessions per week even if I don't push myself I feel fatigued and sore then next 24-48 hrs this is the reason I only do I set per week per muscle group. 

Is this abnormal?

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John Kiggundu

You really want to have 2-3 sessions per week for any movement/lift to have optimal results. When training movements that place the most amount of stress on the connective tissue(like planche, etc. - straight arm strength), you should never feel it in the tendons. It should feel like it's not enough and like you could do more. Take a position like a planche lean: use minimal lean, build up to a couple of sets of reasonably long holds, increase the lean, drop the volume, build back up, rinse & repeat. Never during the process should you feel like your elbows are getting a workout. That's the safe way to be sure your connective tissues adapt. Other general pointers(for all your strength work): never go all out, always have a rep left in you; deload when appropriately. Use your bent arm strength work to build strength and muscle and treat straight arm work as a separate category, almost like skill work.

 

Wish I'd done this 3 months ago when I started planche leans. I tried too hard too soon and I've been nursing an injury in my elbow for 3 months counting.

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GoldenEagle

Just gettting the information out there, for anyone who doesn't already know.

 

Tendons connect muscle to bone. Stronger tendons means you can use more of your current muscular strength.

Ligaments connect bone to bone. Stronger ligaments means your joints are stronger.

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Alessandro Mainente

When you start an exercise where you can manage barely 1 rep, you will need about 10 to 12 weeks to adapt your joints connective tissue. 

The level of tension you can feel during a position is a parameter with less importance. simply the fascia adhesion of a muscle belly could be carried to the muscle insertion near the bone. this could appear like no tendon adaptation , but indeed it's only a local and temporary condition. the template suggested on the foundation series works perfectly to ensure the joint adaptation. 

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Toni Laukkavaara

I think training only once a week will have really slow progress?

depends on the current level and person but in general one to two times a week is the most optimal

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Connor Davies

depends on the current level and person but in general one to two times a week is the most optimal

Are you talking total sessions or per body part? I train 3 days in a row before I have a day off...

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Valerie Christian

When I do that many sessions per week even if I don't push myself I feel fatigued and sore then next 24-48 hrs this is the reason I only do I set per week per muscle group. 

Is this abnormal?

I am aware that this is an old post but it sounds like your work capacity is pretty low but it is trainable 

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Bradley Bocker

I am kind of new, taking this into account i do not know if this is the appropriate place for this question but does anyone know of some movements to strengthen the the wrists for handstands?

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Leonhard Krahé

The handstand courses have a complete wrist series.

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