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Deins Drengers

% of BW during a pushup/PPPu ?

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Deins Drengers

How can I measure/calculate the % of BW I am pushing during a Pushup and Pseudo planche pushup ?

 

Would be interesting to see the biomechanics behind it.

 

And in addition if you know the % of BW in pulling from ground row and pullup.

 

Thank you !

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Sam Rea

How can I measure/calculate the % of BW I am pushing during a Pushup and Pseudo planche pushup ?

 

It's usually considered to be about 70% for a pushup I think. For a PPP it is obviously more, but it depends on your lean. If you get to the point where your feet are starting to lift off the ground then it's approaching 100%. Try peforming them with one hand (or both hands) on a set of scales for an accurate measurement. You might have to raise the height of your feet and other hand slightly to compensate.

 

And in addition if you know the % of BW in pulling from ground row and pullup.

 

Thank you !

For a row you could put the scales under your feet, but I think it would be about the same as a pushup.

For a pullup, definitely 100%!

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Jon Douglas

I generally hear 60% for a standard pushup. It gets severely confounded by angles and leans and the changing contributions of muscles as you move towards full planche pushups. I seem to remember Coach comparing them to a 2* bw bench press on a very unstable surface. In terms of raw weight moved, obviously its 100% minus the weight of forearms and hands.

Same with pullups.

Of course you could do your pushups on scales. .. you could even quantify how much weight you have left to take off your feet and onto your hands if you did your planche leans on scales, I guess, although the figure isn't useful for anything I'm aware of due to the confounding factors mentioned above.

Rows I have no idea :) and no idea how you could readily accurately measure it, unless you used weights on pulleys on your ring straps and were willing to do some trial and error....

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Christoph Pahl

It also depends on your body type. I remember this being discussed by Roger Harrel (?) "65%, I'm on the top heavy side". Pullups I'd estimate ~ 97%: You don't pull your hands or forearms up, and your upper arms only partially :)

Edited by Christoph

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Sam Rea

Pullups I'd estimate ~ 97%: You don't pull your hands or forearms up, and your upper arms only partially :)

Good point! It would be quite easy to weigh your forearms and hands if you wanted to. This just made me realise with a OAC you actually lift more than twice as much as in a normal chin, since you have to lift the whole of the non-working arm.

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Christoph Pahl

Most OACs I've seen included a movement of the free arm remindful of pulling a toilet flush, I finally understood this.

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