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Edoardo Roberto Cagnola

How long I will work on Foundation 1?

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Murray Truelove

I think that describing yourself as "Joe Average" on this forum may discourage people who don't advance at the pace you did Jon. Although you may think you started with average ability, you clearly did not in that you showed mastery for all F1 elements other than RC:PE6 within the first month that F1 was released. To this day, I haven't read of anyone on this forum who progressed as quickly as you. Just face it already, you're a freak :)

I think most of us are stuck trying to touch our toes, arch our backs, sit in a squat and swivel our hips.

There's no doubt progress would be much faster in an individual who started with good mobility.

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Marios Roussos

For what it's worth, I was being facetious when I said that Jon was a "freak"; I have no doubt that his progress has to do with his strong work ethic and attention to detail.

 

That being said, one can't ignore the fact that he was ready to move on to F2 about two weeks after F1 was released. He was therefore definitely better prepared than the average consumer when he started working on the Foundation series. From what I remember, he took to repeating the HBP and sPL elements on rings while waiting for F2 to be released :)

 

I think that the length one takes to complete the series is highly individual and can vary widely depending on one's starting level of physical ability and level of commitment. In the end, as long as one is working diligently, the length it takes doesn't matter. You'll be working on F1 for as long as you stand to derive some benefit from it, so you're not wasting time by putting your head down and plodding along. They key is to get started and not give up when things get tough.  

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Jon Douglas

For what it's worth, I was being facetious when I said that Jon was a "freak"; I have no doubt that his progress has to do with his strong work ethic and attention to detail.

That being said, one can't ignore the fact that he was ready to move on to F2 about two weeks after F1 was released. He was therefore definitely better prepared than the average consumer when he started working on the Foundation series. From what I remember, he took to repeating the HBP and sPL elements on rings while waiting for F2 to be released :).

 

Yes, this was a bad idea :D Not harmful, just pointless for me.
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RuneRahl

I know this post is old, but I had to say that one of my issues was also with how long F1 would take me. But eventually I was able to start it with dedication. My main issue I think is strength, since mobility is not an issue (being 20 and reasonably limber). So I started putting a little of calisthenics in my workout, such as pushups, dips, and pullups, and going to hypertrophy with the exercises. I was hoping it will speed up the process. It seems to be okay so far. 

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David Tapson

Resurrecting a long dead thread, but I found it, and others will, when searching for "how long..."

I don't know about the others, but I'm not looking for "how long" in terms of instant gratification - I'm about to stump up a not inconsiderable amount for an unknown.  

If it is going to take 4 wks to complete for the average person, then I'm wondering about value - remember - I can't see the content - I don't know what's going to be taught and I don't know what I will be able to do when it is complete - I'm going on faith that this is worth purchasing and I'm looking for some information that would indicate that it is a good purchase.

However, if I see that it takes 6 months (for fit, strong, mobile folk) to two or more years (for old folk like me :) ), then I'm thinking that this is good value for money.

So don't be too quick to judge... ;)

Having done the Fundamentals course, and from my experience with quick resolution of the odd issue with that, plus the quick and informative responses I got on the forum, I think the not-inconsiderable-amount is probably actually extremely good value indeed...

About to purchase Foundations 1 - see you on the other side... :) 

 

Edited by David Tapson
grammar
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Everett Carroll

Hey David,

The surety of your physical preparedness is where much of the value of F1 lies. I'm not meaning to ignore the detailed exercise information, personalized programming and follow along videos, or the complimentary video review service, but the confidence you gain from knowing you've mastered the most effective and complete introductory level physical preparation in the world makes this course indispensable. 

Although I have technically finished F1, I constantly revisit the course. This is repeated regularly, but the basics within F1 are a goldmine of physical wealth. I figure that if you're one of the few who can finish the course in a handful of weeks then you will enjoy it thoroughly and respect the completeness of it. If you're not one of those few, and you take the time to see the course through, then you will have developed the same respect by the end. 

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Jon Douglas

You know what, I am quite happy to stand by my initial figure of a couple years for the whole series.

Based on my own experience, it's *only* once basic mobility is established that this timeline becomes realistic however. The difference in the pace and profundity of progression when I fixed my issues has been eye opening, and I'm going to drop Leo's name again as my exemplar of this :)

Before and during the development of mobility to create a body in balance, progression will occur of course, but it is driving with the handbrake on in several senses.

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Suzanna McGee

I love this thread. Even though it's old, it's still current :) I would say that depending how long it took you to "mess up" your body, with non-intelligent training, no flexibility training, overuse, bad lifestyle habits, etc… that long, proportionally it will take to fix it and get through the Foundation. It's a quite simple equation :)

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Jon Douglas

I'm glad it came up and I could consider it again :)

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Olli Kantola

I started this year, but I'm 34 and had to pause for the summer, because my gym shut down for the summer and I had to move to two different locations for a month each, because of my work. I've also done my share of sitting and have some minor issues with my back. I'd be overjoyed if I would conquer H1 and F1 in the next 2 years.

Had I started this in my yearly 20s, I can see that I would have made progress much faster.

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Pauline Taube

Consistency and patience is the key. Hope you'll get back into training soon.

It's never too late. @Mats Trane is a perfect example starting GST in his 40s. Some students start even later and achieve amazing results :D 

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Leo Trinidad

Hi @Olli Kantola ,

As Pauline said, consistency and patience is the key. Do not worry about the time. Time will pass anyway. It is also normal to train on and off since we all have different priorities in life. The important thing is small constant improvements. You'll be surprised what your body is capable of. Enjoy the journey. :)

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Olli Kantola

Don't get me wrong! I'm not bummed or anything. I'm enjoying the progress I've made this far.

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Joaquin Malagon

I'm just as excited to get started in a month or two, the important thing is to simply do it. It's better doing it later than never at all, it's interesting because I wish I had started the program 2/3 years ago and I'm only 20 years of age. I probably would've still been on F1 but I would've been free of injury, it wasn't until after I lit my hair on fire once that I decided to take a more methodical approach. It's really all about work ethic B-), the community is right regarding time. It goes by pretty quickly :o

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Jon Douglas

Well, if we'd all started at 6 and trained with Coach and also all were born millionaires so never had to work and.... ;)

I'm 31 now and I'm easily 10x the athlete I was in my early 20s. I fully intend to improve for the forseeable :)

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Michael Tolles

guys you have a huge amount of time ahead of you. I wish I could of found GB even 5 years ago I would be light years ahead of where I am now. I am 66 and no you guys are not old. Since starting GB about 3 months ago I am reaching places in stretching that I have not since I was your age. Just remember too keep it up so when you reach my age your joints and health will be bettor. Love reading your posts in this forum learn alot and get motivation from your progress. Keep up the great work and comments.

Michael

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Sean Murphey

Roughly 5 years depending on your physical background

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